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Pull in HDTV with Linux and the HD-5500

By Paul Virijevich on January 03, 2007 (8:00:00 AM)

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I've spent the past few years using an ATI TV Wonder analog video capture card running under Linux. Although this card has served me well, times and technology have been a'changin'. That's why I recently purchased a pcHDTV HD-5500 to see if HDTV was all it was hyped up to be. I can report that HDTV under Linux is not only possible, it's downright fantastic.

The HD-5500 is a low-profile PCI 2.2-compliant card that supports multiple inputs for getting the signal to the card. A standard coaxial antenna input is complimented by component and S-Video. My antenna uses the coaxial connection so there were no problems there. There is also an audio cable to connect to your sound card. The thing that surprised me the most about the card is the inclusion of an IR receiver. The surprise faded quickly -- the instructions state that it's not yet supported.

The only problem hardware-wise is the weak connection for the coaxial input connector. It pulls right off the card easily. After playing with it for a couple of minutes, I could not figure out how it's meant to stay on. Fortunately this is not really a problem once the card is installed.

I installed the card in a dual-processor machine with two 1.2GHz AMD Duron processors. This may seem a little underpowered for HDTV when a 2GHz or better processor is suggested for playing back HD content. My ace in the hole is an Nvidia GeForce 440MX graphics card that supports accelerated playback of HD content.

Linux support for the HD-5500 could not be better. The card is manufactured with the sole purpose of being used with Linux. There are no Windows or Mac OS X drivers available. The drivers are included in kernels 2.6.18 and later. Drivers for earlier kernels are provided by pcHDTV. Because I was using a 2.6.16 kernel, I found myself relying on the company's driver.

As with most hardware and Linux these days, installation was painless. After downloading the latest driver from pcHDTV's site, a quick make; make install did the trick.

The HD-5500 comes with a few different software tools to get you started. I suggest skipping the versions on the included CD and downloading the latest ones from pcHDTV's site. The following tools are provided in the dtv-atsc-tools package:

  • dtvsignal - Measures the signal strength of digital channels
  • dtvscan - Scans the entire Over the Air (OTA) frequency table and reports signal strength for each channel it finds
  • getatsc - Grabs an HDTV stream. Good for dumping streams to disk.
In addition, pcHDTV provides a custom version of xine called xine-hd for viewing HD channels. Here is a quick overview of how each tool works.

HDTV signals are directional. Reception is highly dependent on distance from the transmitter and the type of antenna used. You need at least 60% signal strength to get good reception. That's where dtvsignal and dtvscan come in. They are great for letting you know what channels have enough signal strength to be worth your time. Running dtvscan without any arguments is a quick way to get an idea of what you will be able to receive. Then you can use dtvsignal to home in on what antenna position works best for each channel. Just pass the utility a channel that dtvscan finds as an argument. For example:

dtvsignal 15

This brings up a signal strength bar that changes dynamically as you move the antenna.

After popping in the card, installing the drivers, and using the methods I just described, I located a total of five HD streams with 10 separate channels in less than an hour. Not all of those streams were HD channels. Broadcasters transmit multiple channels on the same HD stream. These streams contain HD channels along with standard definition (SD) ones. It's worth pointing out that I am in the middle of nowhere when it comes to OTA TV reception. SD channels that I barely got with the TV Wonder card come in crystal clear when pulled from the HD stream. I even get channels that had always been too far away to receive with analog reception. The fact that I am able to pull in HD streams from stations 50 miles away speaks volumes about the superiority of broadcasting in HD. Even more impressive is the fact that this is possible with a small indoor antenna. In major markets, you can to expect to get up to 30 channels.

The getatsc tool is a great way to make sure the card is working. It's also a simple command-line way of recording programs. For example, this command records the HD stream on channel 15:

getatsc -dvb 0 15 > recording.ts

Once you've started recording, you can point your favorite Linux multimedia player at the file and start playing right away.

The only problem with getatsc is that it does not let you select sub-channels of an HD stream to record. When you play back the file, you may or may not get the channel you want. Supposedly there is a way to select a sub-channel with pcHDTV's patched version of xine, but it never worked for me.

The application pcHDTV expects you to use for viewing HD content is xine-hd. I grabbed the latest version from the company's site and had no problems with the installation. Keeping it up and running while playing back HD content was another thing.

The only extra step you need before tuning in HD channels is to create a playlist of channels with dtvscan, like this:

dtvscan -fx -o ~/.xine/channels.atsc

Once that file is in place, xine will cycle through those channels using the up and down buttons in the xine-hd skin.

This all works as advertised, and I was soon watching HD channels through xine. Watching an HD stream without accelerated playback pegged one processor and left the other one at about 30% usage. The video played back smoothly but the audio was a little choppy. Changing channels took a little longer than I liked, but I have seen almost as bad with some cable and satellite receivers.

Next it was time to find out what kind of boost the accelerated playback from the video card would give. This time I started up xine with:

xine -V xvmc

The first thing I noticed was that the audio was now coming in perfectly clearly. CPU usage dropped dramatically. One CPU sits at about 30% usage while playing back full-screen HD content, and the other is around 10%. That is quite an improvement from a video card you can purchase online for about $30.

Unfortunately, this version of xine is not without its problems. For starters, audio sometimes drops out when you're changing channels. It seems to happen most often to channels in the middle of the lineup. The problem starts after you've cycled through the first few channels; it is not related to specific channels. If I move the order of channels around in channels.atsc, the problem remains. This problem is sporadic and happens only with xine. The instructions from pcHDTV suggest pausing the playback and then restarting it to fix this problem. This did not work for me.

The other problem with this port of xine is its general stability. It would sometimes crash for no discernible reason. Sometimes it played for an hour or more without crashing. Other times it only took five minutes. After using it a couple days, it became apparent that this version of the software just doesn't cut it at this time.

This brings us to my experience with MythTV and the HD-5500. Things went much better here. I stuck with my existing MythTV setup. All I did was delete the TV Wonder as an input source and add the HD-5500. The card is supported by MythTV and is available from a list of DVB cards in the setup program. MythTV has its own scanner to search for available HD streams.

Just as with xine-hd, I have MythTV using accelerated playback with the Nvidia card. Playback of SD channels is terrific. But unlike with xine-hd, HD playback in MythTV doesn't quite cut it with the processor power I'm throwing at it. Video plays back smoothly, but choppy audio rears its ugly head once again. This occurs even when I play back previously recorded HD content. The same file plays back perfectly with xine-hd. At this point, I plan on picking up a couple Athlon MP 1900+ processors on eBay with which to upgrade my video server. That should take care of any processor-related issues. I am even toying with the idea of building a separate HD MythTV PVR. The ability to turn a nearly six-year-old computer into an HD PVR is a testament to Linux and its SMP capabilities.

Before this experience, I was skeptical of the need to phase out analog broadcast signals in favor of HD. Now I have to say I am firmly on the HD bandwagon.

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on Pull in HDTV with Linux and the HD-5500

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Windows not invited.

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 04, 2007 08:13 AM
"The card is manufactured with the sole purpose of being used with Linux."

So now we have the video version of a Linmodem. Combine that with the dodgy connector and no FM. Nyet to this piece of hardware.

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Re:Windows not invited.

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 05, 2007 08:22 AM
Actually, there is windows support accoding to the faq.

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Re:Windows not invited.

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 05, 2007 11:48 PM
I'm still of the view that a Hardware Vendor (being a vendor of phisical merchandise) should support the major multiple OS that a customer may choose from rather than push a Software Developer's mandate of a single platform.

Companies should serve there Customers rather than backroom lock-in license deals.

I am pleased as a pickle that more hardware manufacturers are finally looking at OS outside the proprietary world though.

If someone can give me an ATI/nVidia equivalent GPU I'd become pleased as a sweet pickle. Unfortunately, the most open GPU provider is Intel and they just don't push the gaming grade graphics that the proprietaries do.

Boo! and Bad Ati/nVidia; no biscute for you if you continue to provide closed binaries (fine, there hardware patent issues involved so it has to stay closed for now) which function like what a dog wouldn't even eat compaired to the Win-monopoly drivers.

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This card is fabulous

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 04, 2007 03:39 PM
I realized that my old bt878 wasn't going to be useful for many more years. I realized that the 5500 was the perfect TV card for me after doing quite a bit of research on the TV cards out there.

One big issue for me was that I wanted to avoid both proprietary drivers and firmware. The 5500 not only succeeds in both of the points, it was the only card I could find that did so.

The card was even instantly recognized by mythtv on my ubuntu box without needing to do any serious fiddling. In simpler words, installing the card was much easier than installing a new hard drive and almost as easy as installing a usb mouse. The 5500 even comes with a built in sound device, which means you don't need to install a sound card for it.

As a topoff, I found out just how cool 'hdtv' really is. Reception is crystal clear, even for channels that are just ntsc rebroadcasts. Even better, it turns out that many of my old uhf channels have magically turned into several channels. For example, I have _four_ PBS channels instead of just having one.

I _love_ this card. Love it, love it, love it. I'm trying to decide between either getting a second one, or upgrading my mythtv box and getting three more.. =)

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Hmm

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 03, 2007 05:33 PM
pcHDTV the manufacturer of the HD-5500 card as article on Wikipedia;
* <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PcHDTV" title="wikipedia.org">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PcHDTV</a wikipedia.org>

They have open source device drivers and open source player for their TV cards.

I don't see what all this High-Definition thing is good for. HD-DVD and Blu-Ray is in format war, there is no one standard (to rule them all). And the devices are very expensive. There are almost no movies or media shipped on HD-DVD or Blu-Ray yet.
I am not aware of any HD steams for cable TV or anything like that either.

DVD exists and it works well, its nice quality.

I never ever watched a DVD movie on my computer, even though I do have a DVD-ROM.

HD content is almost non-existent.

Even if HD was widespread, does it offer any noticeable increase in quality to that of DVD?

HD is completely irrelevant and boring to me, maybe in 10 years it will be good. And HD is so tightly knitted with broadcast flag and DRM and crap. Screw that.

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It's for off-the-air reception

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 03, 2007 08:34 PM
The HD-5500 is for receiving off-the-air HDTV -- most cities have digital transmissions these days and IIRC they have not implemented the broadcast flag.

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I watch TV on TV

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 03, 2007 08:41 PM
Well, if I want to watch something on TV, then I rather just goto the TV, and watch it there instead of watch it on the computer.

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Re:I watch TV on TV

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 03, 2007 09:11 PM
So does the author of the article (you did read it, right?)

Mythtv is a media center pc app that works nicely with a remote and with a TV as a display.

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Re:I watch TV on TV

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 05, 2007 11:51 PM
Great, continue to watch broadcasts on your TV. If it's a shnazzy, stinking huge, flat I can understand completely.

Me, I like to have the choice of watching in the family room with what the family wants to watch or watching on my den workstation when I'm working or don't want to watch America's Next Top Wanna-Be (model, idol.. whatever).

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Re:Hmm

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 03, 2007 08:57 PM
> I don't see what all this High-Definition thing is > good for. HD-DVD and Blu-Ray is in format war,
> there is no one standard (to rule them all). And
> the devices are very expensive. There are almost
> no movies or media shipped on HD-DVD or Blu-Ray yet.
>I am not aware of any HD steams for cable TV or
> anything like that either.

Uh, I think you're commenting on the wrong article. This is about broadcast hdtv, not discs. Comcast offers hd for only a little more than their cheapest analog cable, and over-the-air HD is available almost everywhere (<a href="http://antennaweb.org./" title="antennaweb.org.">http://antennaweb.org./</a antennaweb.org.>

> HD content is almost non-existent.

All the major networks (and fox and upx and pbs) produce and broadcast HD content. For free, with an antenna.

> Even if HD was widespread,

It is.

> does it offer any noticeable increase in quality to that of DVD?

1080(i or p) looks significantly better than DVD on my television, and I have to scale it down to 720p. 1080 resolution is 1920x1080. Nature and Nova at 1080i is mind-blowingly detailed.

> HD is completely irrelevant and boring to me,
> maybe in 10 years it will be good. And HD is so
> tightly knitted with broadcast flag and DRM and
> crap.

The HD-5500 claims to ignore the broadcast flag. I am not affiliated with pchdtv in any way except as a satisfied customer, but I have never seen it refuse to record anything.

HD is here, there is TONS of HD content and it's generally better than DVD quality. It's DRM-free, and OTA reception is better than analog. The only reasons I can think of not to go HD is if you don't watch TV. Cost used to be an issue (TV's with HD tuners are expensive), but the HD-5500 is cheap and awesome. It does require a beefy pc to watch 1080, so I guess cost isn't completely eliminated yet.

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pcHDTV

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 03, 2007 05:52 PM
Why haven't I heard about this awesome company pcHDTV that makes Linux-compatible HDTV cards with open source device drivers before?

I hope they release the hardware specifications for it too like Sun Microsystems did for the UltraSPARC T1 (Niagara) processor.

pcHDTV has been added to wiki about computer hardware vendors that are open source friendly;
* <a href="http://vendors.bluwiki.org/" title="bluwiki.org">http://vendors.bluwiki.org/</a bluwiki.org>

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Low-profile PCI card

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 03, 2007 07:55 PM
Cool, I like a lot low-profile cards. I wish all my expansion cards was low-profile. It makes better air flow, and less place for the dust to hang on to.
Makes it look nicer, and less clutter.

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Component?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 03, 2007 10:00 PM
This article says the card has component, which I thought was odd. I haven't looked recently, but last time I looked, component HD input couldn't be had for anything near an affordable price.

Checking the pcHDTV site, it says nothing about component and from the picture it doesn't look like it has it. However, there could always be a dongle. It would be sweet if it did support component in, I deffiantly would buy it. Receiving HD OTA is hit or miss in the apartment, which is why I haven't used it in a long time, Comcast for the save!

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Re:Component?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 04, 2007 11:57 PM
It doesn't have component. Just coax and s-video input. There is also an audio input to be used with the s-video input. The S-video and audio input are used to capture standard definition stuff from a cable box for example. Be careful though the HD-5500 doesn't have an MPEG encoder so the analog s-video input will create large files unless your application compresses the data itself.

You can also capture unencrypted QAM 64 and QAM 256 from cable with this card.

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Re:Component?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 05, 2007 12:18 PM
It is not listed on the web site, but the card does have component in. There is a dongle that includes the component, S-Video, audio to sound card, and IR. The instructions read that it is for connecting a VCR, so whether or not it will do HD is a question mark.

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Re:Component?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on February 26, 2007 12:52 PM
Are you sure "component" or "composite"? Composite would be an RCA-type single yellow input. Component would be three (red, green, blue) RCA-type plugs.

#

comparison to Haupauge?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 03, 2007 10:43 PM
ATI continues to be usless under Linux unless you have a tuner card still supported by Gatos/xawtv and X.org's included Gatos drivers ain't cutting it. The novelty of booting to Windows any time I want to watch tv while working and watching ATI's piss poor DVR function crash has warn off. My machine's going with a new, Linux functional, tv tuner/gpu brand.

How does Haupauge tuner boards stack up against the pcHDTV?

Has anyone installed a Haupauge recently; under which Linux; easy/issues?

pcHDTV is completely open, anyone know how open Haupauge is or do the open source project drivers "just work" like they should?

As an unrelated question; what's the prefered remote to install under Linux these days (I'm also planning a Tivonix of some sort for the family room). Again, ATI's radio remote is slick unless your not booted to Windows.

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Re:comparison to Haupauge?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 19, 2007 06:09 AM
Haupauge is no good in the HD world. Fusion (HD-xxxx esque) and MDP-130 (hardware-based) are the WinOS-only alternatives.

Check out digitalconnection.com if you're interested (and no, I have nothing to do with the company).

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Just a friendly warning!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 03, 2007 11:17 PM
Before turning on anything, pay attention to the correct connections.

Never connect an active computer to an active TV set. TVs do no have grounds!

People have burned capture boards because of this!

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Re:Just a friendly warning!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 04, 2007 08:09 AM
"Never connect an active computer to an active TV set. TVs do no have grounds!"

Uh, huh. In your expert opinion, right?

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Europe

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 04, 2007 12:21 AM
Does this card work in Europe?

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Re:Europe

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 04, 2007 08:38 PM
No, it does not. Blame your incompetent leaders for creating seperatist standards.

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Re:HDTV != Digital TV

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 04, 2007 06:17 PM
Also, watch out: The card does not have: HDMI in or out (it's unlikely that we'll see a HDMI incoming port soon), so the interoperability w/ HDTV sets will be poor.

Uhh, isn't that something you'd want in the video card not the tuner?

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Re:HDTV != Digital TV

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 12, 2007 09:18 AM
correct... HDMI in a capture card is likely to not be available anytime soon, but that is only needed to capture from HDMI sources NOT to playback.

There are already video cards with HDMI ports. Some allow for the digital audio from the soundcard to be piped into the hdmi port, others dont...

Note that a DVI port (from video card, not capture card) with a DVI to HDMI converter also does the job (excludes the audio of course, but you can always send that to via spdif from sound card)...

#

Another Linux-Friendly alternative ATSC dual-tuner

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 05, 2007 12:02 AM
Another product in this category is the HDHomeRun external *ethernet* connected device. It has dual ATSC (HD) anntenna inputs and tuners, and outputs the channel streams over ethernet (TCP or UDP). Saving a program to disk is as simple as using netcat (or socat) to dump the stream to a file.

Myth (0.20) and mplayer work very well with it, and no kernel drivers are required to support the device since it's just a network device.

Reception is much better than the tuner built into my "real" HD TV set, but it would be interesting to see a comparism with other PC tuners such as the HD-5500.

Cheers

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Using HD3000

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 05, 2007 12:49 AM
I'm using an earlier card(HD3000) in one of my boxes with Fedora Core 6.

All it's needed is just install FC6, configure yum to point to freshnet's rpms, install xine, setup the channels list and then start xine dvb:/ -V xvmc. The latest xine can use the HD3000 directly using the dvb interface without having to patch it.

This is far simpler than what it was before when one has to do a whole lotta patching, compliling and a LOT of fidding just to get the card going!!!

I like the ability to save the streams so that one can burn it to dvds to rewatch the shows.

Of course, one can use the HD3000 card to watch regalur tv using a program like tvscan too!!!

All in all, very nice card to have.

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Re:Using HD3000

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 11, 2007 11:09 AM
I also have an HD3000 and I just installed fedora core 6. I upgraded to the latest xine (xine-0.99.4-8.fc6) using yum and I setup my ~/.xine/channel.conf file. However, when I run xine dvb:// I get an error saying:

There is no input plugin available to handle 'dvb://'.

The same occurs when I start xine without any args and click on its DVB button.

I currently have a single entry in the channels.conf, and it is:

WFAA-DT:189000000:8VSB:0x11:0x14:0x01

Note that I have been able to compile the pchdtvr utility and that does capture ok, but I would like to have xine working. Could someone help me get xine working?

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Re:Using HD3000

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 13, 2007 08:03 AM
there is a utility called dvbscan that will scan for ATSC channels in your area...

Here is an example of an invocation....


      dvbscan -a 0 us-ATSC-center-frequencies-8VSB

At the end of the scanning, it produces a table with all of the ATSC channels found in a format for xine to use... here is a part of mine...

KTVK-DT 3:533000000:8VSB:17:20:1
KPHO DT 5:491000000:8VSB:49:52:3
KAET-HD 8:563000000:8VSB:49:52:3
KAET-SD 8:563000000:8VSB:65:68:4
KBAQ 8:563000000:8VSB:81:84:5
KSAZ-DT 10:575000000:8VSB:49:52:3<nobr> <wbr></nobr>...

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Re:Using HD3000

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 17, 2007 01:44 AM
Hi, thanks for the tip.

I was not able to find dvbscan, but I did find a tool named scandvb... I believe that is what you meant because scandvb had to be run in the exact same way you described. I got scandvb as part of the dvb-apps rpm which I installed by running:


      yum install dvb-apps

Anyhow, I ran scandvb and it found all the channels. I created a new ~/.xine/channels.conf file containing the channel data I got from scandvb. However, I still have the same issue with xine.

Do I need to patch xine somehow in order to get it to work with the HD3000 (with dvb drivers) or do I just need to compile and use xine-hd? I thought the changes in xine-hd had already been incorporated into the latest xine.

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Re:Using HD3000

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 17, 2007 08:11 AM
If you pulled the latest from freshrpms, it should be ready to go. Don't use the xine-hd.

Just start up xine; hit the dvb button or start xine like this.. "xine dvb:/"

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Re:Using HD3000

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 17, 2007 08:23 AM
One other thing to check, make sure you got the card's firmware file loaded. You should see messages in<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/var/log/message or whatever it is for your distro and look for firmware being loaded.

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Re:Using HD3000

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 25, 2007 12:38 PM
Thanks for the replies!

I finally figured it out: one must have the xine-lib-devel package installed in order for xine to work with the HD3000.

#

Audio cable to connect to your sound card?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 05, 2007 02:52 AM
The article says it includes an "audio cable to connect to your sound card." Is this for real? I thought that audio cable stuff was back in the bt848 class stuff, and modern capture cards didn't need it. (My PixelPro PlayTV has the cable, but I don't consider it "modern.")

More importantly, before the Broadcast Flag gets purchased/legislated, I plan to buy a pair of HD capture cards to put in my Myth box, and use Myth frontends as set-top boxes after NTSC cutoff. (One to watch, one to record.)

If this thing needs an audio card, it means 2 of them need 2 audio cards or a specialty card, and we're starting to get into box-stuffing problems. (Only 3 PCI slots in my Myth box)

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Re:Audio cable to connect to your sound card?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 05, 2007 12:09 PM
The card also has a traditional NTSC ala the bt848 class stuff. I believe that is what the audio cable is for.

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Re:Audio cable to connect to your sound card?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 06, 2007 12:35 AM
The audio cable is only used for analog channels as the sound has to be extracted from the channel and sent thru this cable to the audio input of the sound card.

The digital channels has the audio encoded in the stream and gets extracted and sent directly to the sound card by whatever is playing the stream as in myth or xine.

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Can I use this with a cable or satellite box?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 05, 2007 07:10 AM
I have a myth box up and running with my low def satellite box by running the SVHS video-out to my capture card (Plextor m402u). I'd love to upgrade to HDTV but I am not sure how it would work. I'm told there are only 2 "over the air" channels in my area, so I'd probably just upgrade my satellite tuner to the HD version. But would I be able to plug in the component or DVI output from the satellite tuner into this capture card somehow? I already know my company does not provide a firewire port...

thanks

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Re:Can I use this with a cable or satellite box?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 30, 2007 03:54 AM
You got lucky. This thing is NOT that easy to get working overal. The xine-hd program is very difficult to compile unless they updated it recently.

Great product but not friendly to anyone but very experienced linux users. The more recent built-in kernel support is a big help though.

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Re:HDTV != Digital TV

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on January 19, 2007 06:14 AM
This is a _software_ based tuner card. Look for an approperiate card to pair it with, e.g.:
MSI NX7600GS-MTD256E-HD
<a href="http://www.hardwarezone.com/news/view.php?cid=6&id=6374" title="hardwarezone.com">http://www.hardwarezone.com/news/view.php?cid=6&i<nobr>d<wbr></nobr> =6374</a hardwarezone.com>

DrCR

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Re:HDTV != Digital TV

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on March 03, 2007 10:29 PM
BlackMagic Intensity == $250 HDMI input, uncompressed HD stream<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.. 1.5 Gbps.
And ofcourse.. no linux support<nobr> <wbr></nobr>:-/

#

HDTV != Digital TV

Posted by: Administrator on January 03, 2007 11:47 PM
The author makes the mistake to associate the multi-stream-channels and the "crystal clear" picture to HDTV. However, those are benefits of digital TV (ATSC here), not specifically HDTV.

Also, watch out: The card does not have: HDMI in or out (it's unlikely that we'll see a HDMI incoming port soon), so the interoperability w/ HDTV sets will be poor. The card also does not utilize the DVB standards, which I think are used in most of europe.

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Help

Posted by: cubanfreevc on February 09, 2008 02:02 AM
Im cubanboy , and here have many restrictions in internet , this is the unique site that we can enter, please here in this website can exist a donwload sections that have all new version from emunation for download ??? Emunations is a Plugins for DVB-S Card. thanks all, sorry for my bad english. Cubanfreevc

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