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Getting rid of the OpenOffice splash screen

By on April 30, 2003 (8:00:00 AM)

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- By <SLASH HREF="http://roblimo.com" ID="d6ce25c2cc3b127d06ee7072e4e96563" TITLE="" TYPE="LINK">Robin 'Roblimo' Miller</SLASH> -
I am a heavy user of both StarOffice and OpenOffice in Linux because my work forces me to interact with many people who seem to think Microsoft Office's default file formats are the only ones there are. On the whole, I'm happy with StarOffice and OpenOffice except for one thing: The annoying splash screen that takes over your desktop when you start one of them. It's not hard to remove that splash screen, even if you're a "point and click" Linux user. Here's how you do it:

1. Open a terminal window.

2. Become "superuser" by typing "su" and then, upon request, your root password.

3. Type "kwrite" if you prefer KDE, "gedit" if you prefer Gnome. You now have a text editor ready to go, and since you started it as "superuser" you can use it to modify files that only root is allowed to touch.

4. Find where StarOffice and/or OpenOffice files are stashed on your computer. Red Hat puts them in /usr/lib/, and SuSE puts them in /opt. Other distributions may put them in other directories, but these are probably the two most common. You can reach the correct directory by using the "open file" dialog in KWrite or gedit and backspacing in the "directory selection" box at the top of the editor's "open file" window until you only have a single / showing, then selecting either usr (then lib) or opt.

5. Now you can click your way until you come to a directory named either OpenOffice or OpenOffice.org for OpenOffice or, for StarOffice, either StarOffice or StarOffice6.0. That will give you a list of other titles. One of them will be program. That's the one you want. Click on it.

(This is the same in either OpenOffice or StarOffice, in any Linux distribution. So are all steps that follow.)

6. Now you see a whole bunch of listings. The one you want is sofficerc. When you open this file, it should look like this:

[Bootstrap]
Logo=1
UNO_WRITERDB=$SYSUSERCONFIG/.user60.rdb

Change Logo=1 to Logo=0

Change nothing else. If you change something else by mistake, use Control-Z or your text editor's "Undo" feature in the "Edit" dropdown menu to undo your mistake.

7. Once you've made that one-digit change, and you are sure you haven't changed anything else by mistake, save the modified file.

A number of readers are sure to point out that you can skip all that clicking by just typing in the end file's path and name. That's true. You can. Others are sure to point out that you could use pico, vi, Emacs or another Unix-style text editor to accomplish the same results. Also true. But new Linux users may not be comfortable with non-GUI text editors. Those of you who are accustomed to a command line interface can easily make that little "one to zero" change without the clicking.

Either way, you only spend a minute or two finding and changing a file, and suddenly StarOffice or OpenOffice -- whichever you prefer -- will start up without throwing a giant, work-stopping logo on top of other windows you have open.

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on Getting rid of the OpenOffice splash screen

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Prrtty much the same for Windows OpenOffice

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on April 30, 2003 10:39 PM
The steps are pretty much the same for the Windows version of Open Office. Under this directory:
C:\Program Files\OpenOffice.org1.0.1\program

The is a file called "soffice.ini".

Thanks for the tip.

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One-liner

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on April 30, 2003 11:10 PM
Besides using vi or (x)emacs or pico or whatever, just type in this line:

s=`locate sofficerc`; mv $s $s.old ; sed -e s/Logo=1/Logo=0/ $s.old > $s

which will do all the work for you<nobr> <wbr></nobr>...

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Re:One-liner

Posted by: Ciaran O'Riordan on April 30, 2003 11:39 PM
lol

this must be close to the most hardcore post possible on such a thread<nobr> <wbr></nobr>;)

Ciaran O'Riordan

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Re:One-liner

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 08:56 AM
Not that you'd need OpenOffice by the look of it...

People like you with your masterful use of fundamentally ancient Unix utilities put the rest of us to shame.

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Or you could do this:

Posted by: Void Main on April 30, 2003 11:34 PM
# perl -i -p -e "s/Logo=1/Logo=0/g;" `locate sofficerc`

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Re:Or you could do this:

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 02, 2003 12:43 AM
Nice Perl, but it ought to account for "irregularities" in the file. Perhaps a more robust regexp:

perl -i -p -e "s/^Logo\s*=\s*1\s*$/Logo=0/gi;" `locate sofficerc`<nobr> <wbr></nobr>...just a thought.

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Re:Or you could do this:

Posted by: Void Main on May 02, 2003 05:39 AM
Oh sure, go and make it all confusing...<nobr> <wbr></nobr>:) Actually you are right and I normally would have done that but I was shooting for "shortest" command that would do the trick (assuming the soffice file had not been hand edited and have irregularities). I am sure there are shorter, got one?

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Re:Or you could do this:

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 02, 2003 09:25 AM
Well, this is a little shorter...
perl -pi -e "s/Logo=1/Logo=0/" `locate sofficerc`

I suppose I could replace 'Logo' with 'ogo' or something but that's cheating...

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It gets even better

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on April 30, 2003 11:35 PM

This is one of two tweaks I do whenever I build a system with OpenOffice. The other is equally important: stopping the app from running like you're on a 486. You can do this by increasing the program's memory allocation. There are pros and cons to this, but on a desktop system that uses OOo all the time, it's probably worth it. The steps:

- Launch OOo.
- Go to Tools > Options
- Under the OpenOffice.org category, choose Memory
- Pump it up

Try to increase it just a little first, then come back and add more if needed. No need to go crazy: anything a few MB higher than the default allocation will improve performance noticeably. With no splash screen and more memory, OOo is a decent wp.

Another way to improve your life is to upgrade to OpenOffice.org 1.1 Beta. It's a bit nicer, faster and more polished, and it can export to PDF natively.

-Ed Holden

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Re:It gets even better

Posted by: Joseph Colton on May 01, 2003 02:53 PM
I found a little rough always printing to a postscript file and running the ps2pdf converter. I was unaware that they had created the native pdf export ability.

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Re:It gets even better

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 02, 2003 01:10 AM
OOo 1.1 is really nice -- it loads much faster than 1.0.x, can do anti-aliased fonts on linux without having the user jump through hoops, and as previously mentioned, it can export to PDF.

The import/export filters also look improved, and I think it's using less memory. (It doesn't feel at all 'ponderous' like the1.0.x series.)

give it a shot <A HREF="http://www.openoffice.org/dev_docs/source/1.1beta/" TITLE="openoffice.org"> here</a openoffice.org>

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huh?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on April 30, 2003 11:46 PM
Emacs isnt a GUI text editor?

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not a real GUI

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 06:03 AM
Emacs is not really a GUI text editor. Sure, newer versions have a native "point n click" mode, but they do not follow any of the commonly used conventions for GUIs. For example, the way keyboard shortcuts work is different than in any other GUI, naming conventions are different, window styles are primitive...

In general, the whole thing still wants to behave like it is in a command window. Of course, if they changed it to behave like most modern GUIs, they would lose 90% of their user base, so that's the way it will probably be for a very long time.

There is Xemacs, which is a *little* more like a normal GUI, but not much.

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Re:not a real GUI

Posted by: Ciaran O'Riordan on May 01, 2003 07:07 AM
> Emacs is not really a GUI text editor.

Why? what's required to be called a "GUI" for text editting?

It has a toolbar (bar of buttons), a menubar (bar of menus along the top of the screen), dialog boxes, it has multi-height fonts, it displays images, coloured text. What do you want (for text editting)?

the Gtk/GNOME interface for Emacs 22.0 is nearly finished.

Why did this thread start?

Good night.
Ciaran O'Riordan

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One additional suggestion ...

Posted by: Rich Gibbs on May 01, 2003 12:16 AM
Thanks for the tip!


I have one suggestion: good (=safer) admin practice in Linux/Unix is only to use 'root' when you need it. So a better way to do this is to find the file you need to modify first, then su to root and edit it.

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Splash screen in beta

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 01:28 AM
Just a note, the splash screen in the 1.1 beta includes a progress bar so there is possibly a reason to keep the splash screen

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Works on Mac OS X version, too

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 03:11 AM
OpenOffice.org1.0.1/program/sofficerc

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Backup file first

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 03:52 AM
Rob- It is always advisable to backup the file your changing, just in case:

cp program program.bak

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Ximian OpenOffice

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 06:09 AM
Or you can wait for Ximian's Gtk improvement of OpenOffice. It looks *really* sweet and they say they have eliminated most of the startup wait.

http://www.gnome.org/~michael/XimianOOo/ooo.html

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Re:Ximian OpenOffice

Posted by: eventide on May 01, 2003 12:41 PM
Wow, that does look nice. Is an actual port to gtk+ though? The few webpages about it are unclear.

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The answer to my prayers!!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 06:20 AM
This has been driving me nuts for quite some time, but I never had time (beyond a quick, unsucessful at the time google search) to dig into it.

Thanks for posting the solution for this.

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Supercharge the Startup?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 08:23 AM
That's a great tweak! Now if we could only get the thing to start up faster it would be REALLY great. With MS Windows and Office, it's usually ready to start writing within 3 seconds. With Linux running Star Office 5.2 or Beta 6.1 or OO, we're talking two minutes before it's ready to roll. Ideas anyone?

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faster

Posted by: jms on May 01, 2003 08:52 AM
If you look above..someone posted that you can up the amount of memory that OO uses...its up above in the thread...but yeah, it works!

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Re:faster

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 02, 2003 09:01 PM
Still... Star Office starts and runs faster on Windows than on Linux, no idea why...

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And heres the problem with Linux

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 12:17 PM
Find where StarOffice and/or OpenOffice files are stashed on your computer. Red Hat puts them in<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/usr/lib/, and SuSE puts them in<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/opt. Other distributions may put them in other directories, but these are probably the two most common

And now we see the problem with Linux - standardization. If you can't even come up with a standard location to store config files, how is a vendor going to support an application?

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The real problem with linux

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 03:39 PM
dependency failures

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Re:And heres the problem with Linux

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 04:33 PM
Nothing's wrong with that - the user's and vendor's choice. Any Linux user should be able to locate a file.

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Re:And heres the problem with Linux

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 02, 2003 09:31 AM
Why for the love of god can't you just have a standard that everyone follows. Fuck choice, sometimes you need to dictate a standard for ease of use. Imagine if the TCP/IP standard allowed choice...)apart from SHOULD implement etc.)

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Re:And heres the problem with Linux

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 10:02 PM
If you can't even come up with a standard location to store config files, how is a vendor going to support an application?

It is called<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/etc/. This is an evil hack because it messes with stuff in<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/usr/ directly. And, btw, debian does put that file in<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/etc/openoffice/.

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Outstanding tip !

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 01:10 PM
This has been driving me nuts for a long time. Thanks for digging into it and finding a solution.

BTW: Open Office seems to open a lot faster in Redhat 9.

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What!?!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 03:18 PM
Not using Vi!?!?

How dare you!!!

Go back to windows! You obviously are not a true linux user! Linux belongs to gurus and traditionalists only!

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Re:What!?!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 02, 2003 11:31 AM
ye old fart!<nobr> <wbr></nobr>:) what happens when a customer sends a word doc or some other office suite based document? OOo is a great tool to have around for just that purpose. OOo is very cool for its ability to support docs from/for several operating systems. Ok, I know vi is readable with any text editor, yet a huge percentage of the world still uses m$ office docs (most unfortunately). Its very nice to have an open source solution to participate in document exchange in this type of situation. Its hard to convince everyone to switch, and its also hard to keep up with the constant upgrades. OOo provides a great solution to these issues. Its worth the dare to check it out.

Maybe not a guru or a traditionalist in the Linux world, but am in need of computer tools in the daily tasks. OOo has made the switch to Linux possible, for us and for many, I am sure. Better get used to it, dear Gurus and Traditionalists. You have created a most cool tool, and now it talks pretty well with the files created on the other side. A bridge has been built, and many are now crossing it. I for one have no intention of going back, and I trust others are on the same path. Time for the Gurus and Traditionalists to stand back and look on with pride...your work has created a most awesome toolset. Thank you!!

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Re:What!?!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 03, 2003 12:37 AM
I think he means vi instead of gedit or kwrite, not vi instead of OOo. Either way, he's wrong. It's Emacs instead of all four!

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Tip seems not to work with Star Office 5.1

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 07:24 PM
In Star Office 5.1, the sofficerc file has no "Logo" line, and adding one doesn't prevent the splash screen...<nobr> <wbr></nobr>:(

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Re:Tip seems not to work with Star Office 5.1

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 11:04 PM
You might, ummm, what to try, like, ummm... upgrading, y'know?

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Re:Tip seems not to work with Star Office 5.1

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 02, 2003 11:42 AM
Star Office Version 5.2 was unacceptably slow and memory hoggish on our poor "old" 400 MHz machine with 128 MB. The hassle of downloading OpenOffice over a modem and compiling isn't worth being able to eliminate the splash screen, and seems just as likely to be infuriatingly slow for all the effort.<nobr> <wbr></nobr>:)

IMO, the stuff is all bloatware, anyway; I only use Star Office because thoughtless people email 100kb Word documents when a 500 byte text file would do.

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Debian config

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 01, 2003 11:57 PM
Debian has sofficerc in<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/etc/openoffice, where such things should^Whave to go<nobr> <wbr></nobr>:-P

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Possibly the most useful article EVER!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 02, 2003 07:27 AM
thanks!


emk

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Good tip :-)

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 04, 2003 12:33 PM
But it still takes chuffin' ages to start on my 1.4GHz GNU/Linux laptop with 384Mb. It's slower than MS Office 2002 / CrossoverOffice and that's just wrong.

And it might be helpful to add this quick solution for the impatient reader:
<tt># vi `locate sofficerc`</tt>

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Getting rid of the OpenOffice splash screen on Debian ‘Etch’

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 84.202.41.55] on January 07, 2008 05:58 PM
The location of the file in Debian 4.0r2 ‘Etch’—probably the same location on all its derivatives—is <a href="file:///etc/openoffice/sofficerc">/etc/openoffice/sofficerc</a>.

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