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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

By Susan Linton on December 18, 2008 (7:00:00 PM)

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It's that time of the year again. No, not Christmas -- it's the time of the year we get the latest versions of our favorite Linux distributions. Version 11.1 of openSUSE is being released today. Designated as a point release, there are enough new goodies to warrant a new install or upgrade.

The new release is available in multiple CD sets, as a single DVD, and as a live CD for the i586 or x86_64 architectures. I tested the single DVD for i586.

One of the first changes noticeable is the new license agreement. No longer considered an EULA, it's now referred to as an open source license agreement that requires no actual clicking to accept. However, the license does still contain references to openSUSE and Novell software not released under the GPL which are, in fact, copyrighted or trademarked. openSUSE hopes this change will increase good will and community acceptance after the uprising seen as a result of Mozilla's short-lived EULA in Ubuntu last fall. Summarizing the goal, openSUSE's community manager Joe "Zonker" Brockmeier says, "We now have a licence that presents no obstacle to redistribution, and no obstacle for modification."

The new look created for 11.0 has been further refined in 11.1 and includes some new graphics and updated tools. The redesigned partitioner now lists drives and partitions in a left pane for convenient navigation, and the working drive in a larger, easy-to-view right pane. During installation users are given a proposed configuration, but with the click of a button one can easily be taken to the new partitioner for customization.

During the install, users are given a choice for their desktop environment: either openSUSE's customized GNOME 2.24, KDE 4.1, or Other, which includes KDE 3 and Xfce 4. At the Summary screen users can select other software and additional desktops if they choose by clicking the Software heading. Other configuration elements, such as Booting or Runlevel, can be changed in the same manner, by clicking the heading.

One particularly noteable absence during the install is any network configuration. The network is automagically set up, including the machine name. Removing this step streamlines things for new or hurried users, but those who wish to customize their configuration must wait until first boot. But even this doesn't always work; I set my hostname through the YaST system management utility three different times, but with each reboot the awkward and unmemorable random combination of letters and numbers set by the installer returned. Other newly missing options are the ability to turn off the firewall and the AppArmor security framework.

My first real surprise appeared right after the install. I turned my back for just a minute as the install was finishing, and when I turned back around, I was at the desktop. The post-install configuration is now automated. This might be considered an improvement by some, but again, any personalizations will have to wait until you can use YaST. As it was, I was in a system that had no root password. It turns out that openSUSE, like Ubuntu, now employs sudo to allow users to control the advanced administrative tasks normally reserved for root. This might make using openSUSE easier for newcomers but, as an old-timer who appreciates the permissions system of security, I don't find it an improvement. The easiest way to revert to the old behavior is by seting a root password during the Summary phase of the initial install by clicking the User Settings heading.

With the change to using sudo, your user password is all that's required to install, remove, or update software on your machine. The package management system was completely rewritten for 11.0, and exhibited vast improvements in speed and reliability. Further enhancements are seen this release. The graphical software manager opens, updates, and searches faster than ever. Downloads from the repository and installs are much faster as well. In addition, some searches result in extra package suggestions that can improve their functionality.

Another new element to literally pop up onto the desktop is Smolt, a hardware profiler started by Fedora to collect a list of hardware in use on Linux systems to aid developers and pressure manufacturers. It is now present and open on openSUSE's desktops, and offers to send your hardware profile anonymously to smolt.org.

All of this release's desktop systems are the latest stable versions. Fans of KDE 4 won't be disappointed with the bundled KDE 4.1.3. One of the new features includes KWin compositing enabled by default if your hardware supports it. Alternatively, you can choose to use Compiz from the included Simple CompizConfig Settings Manager. You can also make the desktop behave like a folder. Referred to as Folder View, this feature allows icons, files, and links to have the different "views" we've seen in other folders for years.

GNOME 2.24 offers users an enhanced Nautilus file manager that features a tabbed interface, a new task management tool called Tasque, and improved integrated search. YaST has been more tightly integrated into GNOME in this release as well, with refined widgets.

openSUSE 11.1 will be the last release to include KDE 3.5. Packages for this older version will no longer be maintained or included on mirrors after 11.1 and only high priority security fixes will be implemented from here on out.

The newest stable Xfce 4.4.3 is also available, as are the latest and greatest versions of popular applications. Some of my favorites are OpenOffice.org 3.0 (Novell Edition), Firefox 3.0.4, the GIMP 2.6.2, Amarok 1.4 (2.0 also available), Totem 2.24, Evolution 2.24, FlashPlayer 10.0, Pidgin 2.5.1, and GnuCash 2.2.7. Under the hood is Linux kernel 2.6.27, GCC 4.3, and Xorg 7.4. Power users have access to the Xen hypervisor, Apache Web server, MySQL database, System Backup, and System Restoration. Of course, this is just the tip of the iceberg -- there is just too much great software to list.

Hardware support

I tested this release on two machines. The first was a desktop machine built especially for Linux. openSUSE had no problems with this combination of hardware at all, except that KWin wasn't enabled by default. This machine has Nvidia graphics and would require proprietary drivers for that capability. Otherwise, everything worked at first boot.

I also couldn't resist testing openSUSE 11.1 on my trusty old Hewlett-Packard laptop. Again Nvidia graphics prevented my seeing 3-D desktop effects and, in addition, I had to use Windows drivers for the wireless Ethernet chip through Ndiswrapper. Since NetworkManager was unable to utilize that hardware, I was forced to resort to the traditional method with ifup. This makes roaming a bit more difficult, but at least the configured connection is ready to use at boot.

Conclusion

As a whole, this release signifies another successful body of work. Still one of the most stable and complete systems available, openSUSE could answer just about anyone's computing needs. I experienced only a few small issues with the system during my testing, and was pleased overall.

Still, I found myself disappointed by openSUSE's jumping a bit too hard and fast onto the ease-of-use bandwagon. The tendencies of Linux distribution developers lately to make Linux easier and easier while sacrificing convenient customization is beginning to go too far. While Linux should be easy for new users, making it more difficult and less secure for experienced users isn't the answer. Hopefully, openSUSE and other distributions can find the happy medium and not slip too much further down that slope.

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on openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

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Want to test KDE 4.2 Beta 2? Take OpenSuse 11.1 for a spin

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 89.8.197.49] on December 18, 2008 08:51 PM
My experience with OpenSuse 11.1 RC since November has been very positive. Can't remember ever having tested any RC running more flawless. Then replaced KDE 4.1.3 with KDE 4.2 Beta 1 and updated to 11.1 final a few days back. This morning I installed the KDE 4.2 Beta 2 packages and it's even smoother. I find it safe for (my) daily use.

If anyone desires to have a go at KDE 4.2 OpenSuse is probably the best distro for it although both Fedora and Kubuntu LiveCD's are outthere already....

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Auto-configuration and root password

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 216.170.163.162] on December 18, 2008 09:26 PM
When installing; you are prompted for a user account. And one of the option boxes (checked by default) is to use the same user password for root (also use Automatic Login is set by default). Want a real root password; uncheck that option. Then the next step is to prompt for a root password.

Want to set advanced options during the install? Uncheck the option to automatically detect hardware (one of the first options; before user account creation I believe). Overall; another great release (so far) by the openSUSE team.

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Re: Auto-configuration and root password

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 206.192.231.187] on December 18, 2008 11:03 PM
What is this about Sudo? "This might make using openSUSE easier for newcomers but, as an old-timer who appreciates the permissions system of security, I don't find it an improvement" This is implying that sudo is a new, insecure tool!!!! If It is so insecure, why has it been around on ultra-secure UNIX systems for over 15 years. In the days of desktop systems for families, where everyone uses the same account (and these are the systems openSUSE is aiming for), It makes things much simpler. I myself am a die-hard LINUX/UNIX user and have several machines that only I use and have only one account. It is very nice to have the safety of a normal account and the privileges of a superuser on one account. It also is nice to allow several users to have administrative privileges. Don't get me wrong, there are other ways of setting things up, Mandriva has a nice system requiring you to type in the root password every time you open a system tool and I like that on my single-user systems. Sudo just allows you to have multiple administrative passwords.

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 206.192.231.187] on December 18, 2008 11:05 PM
Why are they using Gnome Slab? What a terrible menu!

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Re: openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 206.192.231.187] on December 18, 2008 11:18 PM
Oh, I forgot, Novell made Gnome-SLAB

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Re(1): openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 68.54.137.186] on December 18, 2008 11:24 PM
I fail to see the point in your comment. Just use the normal menu... It's still there to choose.

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Re: openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 71.98.14.163] on December 19, 2008 05:38 PM
Actually, though it requires somewhat of a paradigm shift, the slab menu is actually prompting you to an increased productivity menu. As has been shown time and time again, browsing menus for an application is a terribly inefficient way to work. Both openSUSE's KDE and GNOME desktops are putting emphasis on the Alt+F2 launcher (several are available). The only time you should use a menu is to grap an app you know you've just run (the "Favorites" and "Recent" sections) or to see what you have installed (in which case, the Application browser is just as well equipped). And if you want to use the menu anyway, you are encouraged to use the search bar at the top of both KDE and GNOME's Slab menu. Despite the controversy, it is an immense productivity enhancement (and Novell knows that; for big business people, time is money).

Of course, the standard menus are only a click away on both desktops.

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 71.131.183.124] on December 19, 2008 12:12 AM
As usual, I'll wait a couple months before upgrading to let them get the bugs out. And there will be bugs as this part of the article shows: "I set my hostname through the YaST system management utility three different times, but with each reboot the awkward and unmemorable random combination of letters and numbers set by the installer returned."

Once again, something was added by a distro and then NEVER TESTED AT ALL.

This is getting to be a habit with just about every distro these days. Canonical seems to be the worst offender, but it looks like the notion of system testing has gone out the window at every distro. As a result, Linux is becoming as unreliable as Windows.

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Re: openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 98.26.53.62] on December 19, 2008 12:54 AM
Testing is done by the community. Maybe you could be helping instead of complaining. The pay stinks but its pretty educational.

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Re: openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 75.152.134.23] on December 19, 2008 05:31 AM
Are you sure your router isn't simply regurgitating the automated hostname back to your computer after you change it? Uncheck the "change hostname via dhcp" option in Network card module of Yast OR force your router to expire the DHCP Lease time for that particular host in your router so it reads the new name.

KennV

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Re: openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 192.35.35.35] on December 19, 2008 02:39 PM
"Once again, something was added by a distro and then NEVER TESTED AT ALL.

This is getting to be a habit with just about every distro these days. Canonical seems to be the worst offender, but it looks like the notion of system testing has gone out the window at every distro. As a result, Linux is becoming as unreliable as Windows."

How much are you paying for that Linux Distro that has features on it that dont work for you?.. How much did you pay for support for it?.. I am guessing zero dollars? Now lets compare that to Windows that you DO pay for and the bundled support that comes with it. The notion that something you get to enjoy for free under the GPL must have some type of support bundled in defies logic, doesn't it? Yet, getting free support for Linux issues is as easy as Google allows, which is remarkable. Linux distros like Fedora, Ubuntu, and OpenSUSE do often include new cutting edge features that don't work for everyone - that is very true, so fix it. Yes, thats right, YOU FIX IT and then contribute the code back upstream. Thats how things work in the Linux world. Windows, on the other hand, you pay for, and so it BETTER work, and when it does not, you go crying to Microsoft's phone support guy in Bangledesh or India or whatever that they pay pennies on the dollar for while raking in full prices for their crappy OS. Have fun with that. I will happily take Linux, and the freedom that comes with it, over that.

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Re: openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 71.98.14.163] on December 19, 2008 05:41 PM
"Once again, something was added by a distro and then NEVER TESTED AT ALL."

Actually, Susan (and yourself) simply missed this step. Automatic configuration includes setting the hostname. If you wish to set your own (as most competent users do) you uncheck automatic configuration. This has been around since 11.0 and as been very thoroughly tested, my friend. Just because you didn't know about it doesn't mean it wasn't meant to be that way.

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 12.159.57.2] on December 19, 2008 12:21 AM
GNOME Slab is my favorite launcher in any distro... although I really dislike the KDE analog. But, to each his or her own....

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 12.159.57.2] on December 19, 2008 12:25 AM
As another post pointed out, openSUSE does not setup sudo a la Ubuntu. Read the dialogs more closely and you'll see what happened. (It isn't a bad thing, either.) As far as hostname goes, though, I see the same issue. Can't get rid of the autoassigned hostname. Otherwise, this is a stellar release. Package management has gone from the worst in all Linux 10.0 to arguably the best. Good job, there. All in all, this is the best openSUSE, yet. And, probably the best free server platform around.

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Hmmmmm...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 199.164.56.5] on December 19, 2008 12:45 AM
New license agreement, no root account, automatic configuration... all the things I run Linux to get away from. Sounds like Suse has taken yet another step downhill. And still that abominable YAST? I really liked Suse way back when (except for YAST, which has always been a sore spot), but they have gone increasingly toward dictating things that should be user choices (much like GNOME overall has done). No thanks.

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Re: Hmmmmm...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 76.226.133.101] on December 19, 2008 01:49 AM
Please make your assessments based on facts. Actually, it creates a root account during install. As far as license agreements are concerned, every distribution is released under multiple licenses. If you are talking about proprietary licenses, you agree to these as soon as you use Flash, Java, Acrobat Reader, many video and wireles drivers, etc. It's pretty common for mainstream distributions to feature some kind of notice about such licensing. Now, if you keep to pure F/OSS licenses, more power to you. If not, don't be hypocritical.

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Re: Hmmmmm...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 71.98.14.163] on December 19, 2008 05:52 PM
"New license agreement, no root account, automatic configuration... all the things I run Linux to get away from"

You run away from a new, liberating license? You like a click through MS style one better? And YasT is a sore spot?

What is funny (and frustrating) about this is that every one of your complaints is about an optional feature. You are not forced to use your account password as the root password, nor to use autoconfig, or to use Yast.

But if you want to complain, you'll find plenty of fodder anywhere. Maybe that makes you happy. Sure, go ahead. Have a lot of fun.

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Re(1): Hmmmmm...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 199.164.56.5] on December 19, 2008 06:41 PM
New, liberating license? It may be liberating compared to Suse's old EULA, but it doesn't liberate anything compared to other distros, such as Debian or Slackware.

As for the rest, read the article. It specifically notes the change to sudo over root (keyword "change"), refers to auto configuration at least twice without any mention of "optional", and bemoans the ineptness of YAST at registering changes to the botched auto config(which is why it's a sore spot... it fails as often as it works - and when it doesn't work it's a major PITA to work around. My system config tool is PICO, it works every time, and doesn't complain when I change things.)

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Re(2): Hmmmmm...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 71.98.14.163] on December 19, 2008 10:08 PM
Yes, that is what the article refers to. I am not sure whether or not you are saying this makes it correct. Susan was mistaken when she said the sudo has replaced the root account. It caught me off guard to with 11.0, though it was in the release notes. openSUSE's team rightly realized that having two different passwords on a home desktop is really overkill. For a home user, the only benefit of a root account at all is to avoid accidental damage to the system (rm -rf /* for example). That purpose is perfectly well served by requiring a user to provide his own password as the root account. Similar in philosophy to Ubuntu's use of sudo, however you are still given a true root account, and you are perfectly free to choose not to use your own password as the root password during the installation (or afterwards). Susan, like many of us, didn't pay close enough attention to the installer's instructions. But the fact is, the installer made it very clear what was going on.

I have never had Yast's configuration "botch" anything on my systems. I find it to be a tremendous time saver. Sure, I could go through CUPs web interface and type in the always changing ips of my network printers. Or I can let Yast do it for me. I can hand edit smb.conf and set a my samba shares on my own. Or I can let Yast do it for me. I can modprobe my wifi drivers and run iwconfig on my own, or I can let yast do it for me. Since, in my opinion, the computer is here to do things for me, Yast fits my bill perfectly. If I wish to have me work for the computer, I can do that too! It's called choice.

I won't say Yast's perfect (it's not) but what does do it does well. Sure pico won't complain when you change things. For instance, if I try to remove a mount point in fstab, and accidentally fudge my root mount line, Yast will complain. If that bothers me, I can shut down Yast, fire up pico, make my change, mess uo my system, and reinstall (or do some other recovery work). The fact is, pico only works as well as you do. I happen to be a human, and if there's one thing humans do best, it's make mistakes (denying them would place a close second). So for me, having a tried and true tool is a great thing.

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 72.8.81.34] on December 19, 2008 02:45 AM
I gave it a whirl, but my wireless wouldn't work out of the box. I find it ironic that my wireless works great on Arch and Slackware, but the "easy to use distributions" have issues with it. I have had more issues with the latest distributions than I did with the same ones a year ago... more testing please.

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Re: openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 201.62.154.224] on December 23, 2008 12:16 AM
I had some not-quite-pleasant experiences lately, but honestly they could be accounted to distros falling back from ndiswrapper and proprietary xorg drivers (e.g. Via vs openchrome). Several new technologies are being incorporated too, mainly on graphics and wireless area (kernel mode-setting, dri2, gem, ...)

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 190.138.74.68] on December 19, 2008 02:58 AM
come on! even if you donĀ“t get a root account, you can get it by typing "sudo passwd root", type your account passwd then type and confirm the root password. If you dont want anyone to have super user privileges by using sudo you can remove them from the sudoers list

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Re: openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 76.226.133.101] on December 19, 2008 04:03 AM
I don't know if this is a bad joke about "no root account,' but the article is incorrect. Creating a root account is MANDATORY. The portion that Susan missed is that the default has two options checked:

1. Automatic login
2. Make root password the same as the ordinary user password

If you don't look closely, you'll miss these options -- the result is that the install seems Ubuntu-ish. But, root is there all along.

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Ok - but where is something that worked like the old Gwenview and Kipi Plugins for it?

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 64.222.106.217] on December 19, 2008 03:27 AM
Don't use F-Spot or any photo database at all (liked the old Gwenview folder only way). But, the new Gwenview that is showing up with the new KDE is unfinished, has no working Kipi Plugins, and no option to go back to the old interface that we loved.

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Customization during install is there

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 172.16.34.118] on December 19, 2008 08:01 AM
If you install from the installer DVD/CD (not the Live one), you will get all of the customization options the reviewer is missing: disable AppArmor, edit Firewall, set root password, set host name and everything else. Yet you can still go for the automatic configuration like in the Live installer. So if you are not a Linux newbie and want to install openSUSE 11.1, I would recommend the installer CD (I installed it from the network CD, which is less than 150MB.

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hostname

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 213.208.70.235] on December 19, 2008 11:00 AM
I had the same problem with the hostname. The only way I could change it was to edit /etc/HOSTNAME.

And I had a normal root account after installing it. The article is incorrect about having to use sudo

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 210.11.133.106] on December 19, 2008 10:01 PM
After watching adult movies, I want to clean the history in gnome slab menu, but there is no way to do it.

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Re: openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 137.151.175.224] on December 19, 2008 10:42 PM
Create a separate user for that kind of thing...

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No thanks to "open" SUSE

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 151.188.247.104] on December 19, 2008 10:23 PM
I've got nothing against the individual developers of "open" SUSE if they work for Novell (the economy's tough, folks need jobs). But I'm not coming anywhere near AnythingSUSE any more than I go near MS Windows, i. e. it's a very, very rare ocurrence.

I'll stick with distros whose leaders haven't made anti-GPL toxic patent deals with Microsoft, thank you. That means Slackware, Red Hat, Debian, *Ubuntu (Canonical didn't sign that patent deal), Mandriva ("We will not go to Canossa!"), Yellow Dog, etc. But not SUSE. Not until Novell un-does that treachery against us that they did. The BSD folks don't like the GPL--OK, fine. That's an honest difference of position. But they don't try to attack and undermine it with patent deals like Novell did.

Folks, we don't need Novell or their distro, "open" or not. We've got tons of other excellent distros available to us.

--SYG

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Re: No thanks to "open" SUSE

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 71.98.14.163] on December 20, 2008 03:22 AM
Excuse me sir, go home and do your homework. This review is about openSUSE, not Novell's SLE.

Let me make this very clear; Novell's interoperability deal with MS has nothing to do the with the completely free community project called openSUSE. It has to do with customers of Novell using it's enterprise linux solutions, which are based on openSUSE. As for Novell "attacking" us (whoever we are), Novell's devs have submitted far more code to the linux kernel than Canonical. Did you hear that? Novell code is in the linux kernel! Boycott Linus! Quick, before we're all contaminated! The sky is falling!

Yeah, and the big bang really happened...

But have it your way. Quick! run! openSUSE's going to bite you! I don't want you to get hurt!

Have a lot of fun!

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 76.226.133.101] on December 19, 2008 11:25 PM
I also find the lack of a "clear" button on slab menu to be irritating. (For different reasons -- prepping a PC build or virtual machine template, where I want the image/template to be as clean as possible.) Although this is not a help forum, there is simple workaround: run this from a terminal:

rm .recently-used.xbel

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 142.161.83.216] on December 20, 2008 01:41 AM
I like OpenSuSE, and since software isn't a holy crusade for me, I could give a leap over corporate dealings.

That being said, the live CD installer doesn't give you as many options as the DVD does. It's much more automatic. The non-OSS extras CD is a waste of bandwidth to download, unless you're setting up multiple systems and don't have broadband.

I've always used "su" when I need root and never sudo, so I was surpised to read that There Is No Root ;)

KDE4 is much more stable than in the final Beta and RC, where I had crashes galore on the same system. Unfortunately my USB bluetooth radio does not seem to be working, and it's always been solid in other distributions.

Still, I'm going to stick with OpenSuSE, because distro hopping only teaches one how to install an OS. So far I've not had an update that has broken a v11.0 system, unlike the likes of Ubuntu or Mandriva or Mint. That also makes me more confident in using it for file and web server duties, thus saving us a Server 2003 license here and there. Oh, and the Active Directory integration, though we do not use it, was surprisingly slick on a test machine I had been playing with. I hope 11.1 keeps that level of interoperability goodness (the sort that makes the FOSS fundies rage, no doubt).

Slab menu does indeed bite. It reminds me of the Win3.1 Program Manager. Don't care for the KDE4 menu either. IMO Mint got it right with their "mint menu".

Don't know what all the hate is about Re YAST. Just about everything you need in one place? Just no pleasing some people... I suppose they've not used it since the Slow was removed. Likewise I'm glad to see the KDE team borrowing heavy from OSX with their new System Settings setup. The KDE3 setup looks like a poorly assembled jigsaw puzzle put together out of 4 different puzzles in comparison; just a horror show.

I hated KDE4 when it was first out (and incorporated by distros far too early), but now it is growing on me. I just need to find a better main menu for it, since neither the KDE3 nor 4 iterations really do it for me.

/end ramble

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 212.168.165.9] on December 20, 2008 02:30 AM
" No thanks to "open" SUSE"
I've never read so much idiocy

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Re: openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 212.168.165.9] on December 20, 2008 02:35 AM
... Ubuntu developments are under CLOSEND SOURCE hahahaha

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 203.99.173.243] on December 20, 2008 07:39 AM
This is 4th DVD im burning and third installation of KDE 3.5 from opensuse 11.1 DVD anf I get weird errors. Either some packages dont get installed or the installer gets stuck at 94% and system stops respoding at all.

Note that my ISO and ALL the DVDs I burned are fine,md5sums match to official ISO , my dvd bruner is fine, I am using opensuse for years now,previous version works fine too.

So anybody else had any issue with KDE 3.5 installation from the opensuse 11.1 DVD?

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there IS a root account

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 85.179.107.254] on December 20, 2008 11:22 AM
Hey, you've jumped to the conclusion that openSUSE does it the Ubuntu-way; that is not so.

If you read the text during user-account setup carefully you will realize that it says 'use same password for root'. This option is checked by default and does exactly that - it sets the root password to the same as the user password.

So you can log in as root with your user password.

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What is all the mass about root account ;)

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 87.69.148.24] on December 20, 2008 03:35 PM
Hey, I've been an old school sys. admin. for many years. 2 years ago I've pass to Fedora 6 and when fedora 7 couldn't match with my simple IBM corporate PC (an on board Video problem) I made the pass to Ubuntu 7.10. What a rush and inspire Linux version. Believe me I understand those won't the root power in their fingertips but I found the sudo way as the right way to do things around. As mention before still there is a way of doing things old school like but you won't regrade learning the new way to do things around. So, I've been with Ununtu 7.10 & 8.04, the new 8.10 was some kind of disappointment so I will go start to openSuSE 11.1 and I hope that what I had with version 9 will be an bad old memory.

Go Linux !!!

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 72.173.62.167] on December 20, 2008 04:24 PM
I don't care what type of licence they have, Novell is still MS's bitch. I won't run an OS that comes from a company that has no opensource or foss values. Stick to the distro's that have opensource values deep in their blood, Slackware, Debian, Redhat, Fedora, Mandriva. Stop contributing to MS Suse Linux. Go Suse??Easy to use?? No, Its been a rag ever since Novell took it over. Want easy to use Linux with all the same features, Mandriva, Fedora, ect. There all pretty much the same, except the company that owns them. Read up a each distros stand on Community and opensource, free software, ect. Suse sucks big ass, and most of what they say gets bricked by the dollar signs. Nothing about Suse is better than other main stream distros, but there is allot in where they are lacking.

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Re: Novell sucks - use different distro

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 89.8.186.203] on December 20, 2008 04:45 PM
They are all pretty much the same - you are absolutely right!

Therefore:

In order to justify your position thus keeping your nose high and clean you should remove any line of code delivered by Novell, it's employees, it's affiliates and any code financed or sponsored by Novell in any distro you install or may use. Get rid of Evolution, Compiz, Kwin, any part of KDE/Gnome not to mention GPU drivers that include Novell sponsored code.

Just a guess: removing Novell code from the Kernel should keep you busy for a while.

Then you should start paying your share of the expenses arising out of SCO litigation.

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 81.154.231.50] on December 21, 2008 07:57 AM
"As has been shown time and time again, browsing menus for an application is a terribly inefficient way to work."

I do understand the problems the differently-abled face, but with a normal classic menu it takes me 8 seconds at most to get my cursor on the right application: the moronic SLAB type menu either compels one to drill down through changing windows clicking away, or imagines that I am going to bother to memorise every application and the word for each that I should have to type. This is awesomely feeble. My worry is that in the drive to force the latest gimmick, they will eventually take away the normal menu. Linux likes to present itself as easygoing and all things to all people, but through a deep preference for myopia and obscurity generally chooses the least easy way as default. MS has innumerable faults, but praise should be given to their devotion to simplicity in applications; such as having a tree-view manager that just works instead of the retarded twin-pane managers linux sticks with.

As for OpenSUSE 11.1 so far it's been brilliant. ( Apart from the usual initial sound issues. )

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 12.88.34.42] on December 22, 2008 01:49 PM
I agree about the menus. The first thing I do on any system is change the SLAB, KICKER, LANCELOT, or what ever menu their using back to the traditional menu. Literally twice as long to find programs with all these new flashy menus. And what's the point.

Suse has never been my favorite, but any Linux OS that is moving ahead and helping build the software of tomorrow is great. Some people may not like one distro or another, but that's the beauty of Linux, you don't have to use it. There are plenty others out there.

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Errors in the review

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 88.105.39.146] on December 22, 2008 02:17 PM
As others have already mentioned, there are a few errors in the review that suggest problems that are not in openSUSE 11.1.

Susan, you would do well to have a second go at the install and take note of the configuration options that you missed, perhaps you would then be kind enough to update your review.

Thanks

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 165.98.224.243] on December 22, 2008 08:59 PM
I have created a Multimedia Pack portable for OpenSUSE, the included programs and codecs are:

1) VLC
2) Mplayer
3) Smplayer
4) Amarok
5) DVD::RIP
6) K9copy
7) Avidemux
8.) ffmpeg
9) w32codec
10) Gstreamer *
11) K3B - K3BCodec
12) Libdvdcss
13) xine - libxine1*
14) Kdvdcreator
15) Winff
16) mjpegtools
17) Acetoneiso

you can install any of the above without internet, they include all the dependencies, just unzip the both files into a folder named MMP2009 and create a repository from that folder as a simple rpm folder in yast, then make a search in the yast installer with the name of the program and check it to install it, this is very important if you don`t have internet at home, and besides, by default OpenSuse doesn`t include several codecs due to license matters.

I created a blog about the MMP2009 where you can download the pack:

http://easgs.wordpress.com/2008/12/20/multimedia-pack-portable-for-opensuse-111-pre-release

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 204.136.112.10] on January 07, 2009 10:34 PM
The title of this article should be "openSUSE 11.1 makes my screen go blank." Bootup of either KDE or Gnome Live CD seems to make my monitor go blank when runlevel 5 starts up X server. This version probably doesn't like my Diamond Stealth Radeon 7000 card while 11.0 and 10.x had no trouble with it. Well, I guess I won't be upgrading.

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openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 62.29.83.68] on January 15, 2009 12:43 PM
openSUSE's team rightly realized that having two different passwords on a home desktop is really overkill. For a home user, the only benefit of a root account at all is to avoid accidental damage to the system (rm -rf /* for example). That purpose is perfectly well served by requiring a user to provide his own password as the root account. Film izle http://www.izle.bbs.tr The KDE3 setup looks like a poorly assembled jigsaw puzzle put together out of 4 different puzzles in comparison; just a horror show.

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