This is a read-only archive. Find the latest Linux articles, documentation, and answers at the new Linux.com!

Linux.com

Feature: SUSE/openSUSE

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

By Susan Linton on June 20, 2008 (4:00:00 PM)

Share    Print    Comments   

openSUSE 11.0 was one of the most anticipated Linux distro releases of 2008. Despite a few bugs in the final code, which was released yesterday, it was worth the wait. The openSUSE version of KDE 4 alone is worth the download, and the improvements to the software manager make customizing a pleasure.

I used the 4.3GB DVD version, but live CD versions are also available. In either, the first thing you might notice is the beautiful new installer. The layout is similar to that of previous versions, with a large interactive window and a progress list to the right, but with an elegant new color scheme and stylish graphics. And the beauty is not only skin deep -- there are a lot of changes under the hood in this release.

The openSUSE developers have made many improvements to save users time and effort. A new "Installation from Images" option uses a defined set of packages in an install image for many common package groups, such as the GNOME desktop. Using this saves users from having to organize the needed packages and resolve the dependencies at the time of the system installation. It's a feature users can disable if they wish, but it does seem to save some install time.

At the beginning of the install process you can tick "Use Automatic Configuration." In other distributions, similarly worded phrases can turn off hardware auto-detection and lead to long, agonizing configurations. Wanting to avoid that fate, I checked the box, but as it turns out, this setting merely bypasses the hardware confirmation screen where users normally accept the auto-detected proposal or custom configure their hardware. For users who normally agree to the proposed settings, this saves time and clicks.

Automatic Configuration does not bypass the installation summary. You can still change many options, such as the partitioning proposal. openSUSE presents the user with a proposed partitioning layout, but you can edit the configuration to your needs. For example, you can make a new partition or choose one that is already present. You can even use advanced options such as LVM and RAID.

During the DVD install you can choose your desktop envirnoment from among GNOME, KDE 4, KDE 3, Xfce, and Others, listed in alphabetical order. Some other desktops available for install include Enlightenment, IceWM, FVWM, and Window Maker. These less popular desktops don't include the openSUSE look. They are provided as released by the upstream developers.

No desktop environment is selected by default -- you must choose one. At the installation summary screen, you can click the Software heading to select additional desktop environments and software if desired.

The package selection screens haven't changed much in function on the surface, but they too have received a facelift. You can still search or choose packages by groups, package patterns, or individually.

To save another step during the install the openSUSE developers decided that the first user and root would share the same password. They believe that a large percentage of users use the same password for the first user and root, but if you have security concerns, it's easy to change the root password later.

OpenSUSE has always had one of the premier installers in the Linux landscape, and the developers have worked hard to make it even better in 11.0. Besides the items I specifically mentioned, there are little changes all over that make it more streamlined and easier than ever.

Because of its many desktop options, openSUSE is like several distributions in one. Here's a look at each of the major desktop environments.

KDE and Xfce

KDE 3.5.9 and Xfce 4.4.2 are stable, old-reliable desktops, and they functioned just as expected with no problems. Like the other major openSUSE desktops, they are customized to give them an openSUSE look and feel. In fact, the gray and green theme runs throughout the whole of openSUSE, including the GRUB screen, login screen, and application splash screens, which gives the desktop a uniform professional touch.

At first glance, little distinguishes KDE 4 from KDE 3 -- which is a good thing. Instead of a clunky, buggy Vista clone, users are welcomed into a familiar reassuring environment. KDE 4 in openSUSE is an tidy understated desktop with a panel at the bottom, a few icons, the Kickoff menu, and the widget creator in the upper right corner.

In addition to the comfortable environment, many KDE applications are now ported or backported to KDE 4.04 in openSUSE. I was able to import mbox mail files as well as KDE 3 maildir-format files into KMail 1.9.51. Likewise, I was able to import my news feeds into Akregator 1.2.50. Both of these functioned well, except Akregator was a bit sluggish during fetches under the weight of my 700+ feeds. I was able to just drop my Konqueror bookmark file into the .kde4 directory. It appears that for all the improvements KDE 4 is supposed to bring, Flash is still broken in Konqueror, although this is probably a universal in KDE and not confined to openSUSE.

When inserting removable media under KDE 4, the New Device Notifier located in the panel beside the clock opens with a list of devices. Depending upon the media, you may be given a choice of actions or have one default. For example, a data CD gives only "Open in Dolphin," while a USB memory stick opens an action chooser. Beside each device is an icon that will umount or eject the device.

Overall I was impressed with the usability and stability found in openSUSE's KDE 4 implementation. I began experiencing crashes only while exploring the Personal Settings module (Systemsettings, the replacement for the KDE Control Center) and changing numerous settings and reversing them back and forth. This is when I discovered that you need to press Ctrl-Alt-Backspace twice to kill the X server. This is the first time I've needed to do this in openSUSE.

GNOME 2.22

I experienced some issues with the GNOME desktop. It started just fine and seemed functional during the first tests. Problems arose when I tested the update applet. When I was adding a repository, the online update utility crashed and left most of GNOME unresponsive. When I left the GNOME desktop, the login screen font was scrambled or not fully rendered. I logged back into GNOME, but the font problem persisted. I tried to log out again, but now the Logout tool didn't function any longer.

After rebooting the system, GNOME seemed to function normally, but the update applet never returned to the panel. Running Online Update configuration through the YaST Control Center in GNOME continued to crash, and thus the Online Update tool would not function. However, the update applet did continue to appear in the KDE desktops afterward, and I was able to complete configuration and check for updates while in KDE.

Hardware support

Though I had some problems with software in different desktop environments, hardware support in Linux has all but become a non-issue, and this is even more true with openSUSE. While I don't own any exotic or bleeding-edge hardware, what I do have is well supported. For example, my Hewlett-Packard laptop, which was designed for Windows, is almost fully supported. The only exception is the wireless Ethernet chip, which requires Windows drivers. I used Ndiswrapper in 11.0 to extract and load the drivers to bring it to life. Other critical laptop features were available by default, although Suspend to RAM didn't work for me.

Sometimes, though, my Internet connection, which was configured to start at boot, wouldn't be started. The KNetwork Manager didn't function for me this release either. The GNOME network applet seemed to work well, however, so as a workaround, I just used it in KDE too.

Software

openSUSE is what I commonly refer to as a "kitchen sink" distro because it includes everything but the kitchen sink. It'd almost be easier to list what it doesn't have than what it does.

Besides a few extra desktops and the kernel development packages, my install consisted of the default package selection. This includes Firefox 3.0b5, OpenOffice.org 2.4.0, GIMP 2.4.5, Inkscape, Pidgin, Liferea, Ekiga, GnuCash, Evolution, Tasque, and KOffice.

openSUSE also includes the lastest Compiz Fusion. AIGLX, which provides GL-accelerated effects on desktops, should be enabled by default for those with supported hardware. That unfortunately leaves Nvidia users out until they install the proprietary graphic drivers. However, there are graphical configuration tools for enabling and setting options such as the choice of profile. You can choose profiles ranging from lightweight with few effects to full with lots of effects. The CompizConfig Settings Manager provides deeper settings. In addition, there are lots of great plugins included, such as the Magnifier, Window Scaling, and Show Mouse.

Under the hood openSUSE 11.0 ships with Linux-2.6.25.5, X.Org X Server 1.4.0.90, Xorg-X11 7.3, and GCC 4.3.1 20080507.

Multimedia

Multimedia support is a bit lacking in openSUSE by default. openSUSE has a policy of excluding certain code that does not conform to the open source definition and, unfortunately, that includes support for most multimedia formats. openSUSE 11.0 includes the just released Banshee 1.0, Amarok 1.4.9.1, K3b, Brasero, Totem, and Kaffeine. I could listen to an audio CD and watch Flash content from the Web, but I couldn't use any other multimedia file on hand.

However, community-provided solutions are already in place. YaST one-click install wizards will add repositories and install support for popular audio and video formats. After installing the codecs, libraries, and updated applications, I was able to enjoy any video or audio file I tested. I sometimes experienced crashes in Banshee while trying to adjust the volume. The problem was reproducible, but not consistent. I can't seem to get Amarok to recognize my CD-ROM drive either, but I can use KsCD or Banshee instead to listen to audio CDs.

Software management

If you'd like to install additional software, openSUSE comes with a powerful package management system. ZYpp, which utilizes the RPM Package Management format, was completely rewritten during the 10.x series, and 11.0 brings even more improvement. To the end user this means better dependency resolution and much faster performance.

Zypper, the command-line package manager, functions much like apt-get does for APT. It can install, uninstall, update repositories, upgrade the system, or update packages. For example, zypper install crack-attack will install the game Crack Attack. zypper search tuxpaint will see if Tuxpaint is available in the openSUSE repositories you have configured. Some other arguments include remove, addrepo, update, and dist-upgrade.

Those who prefer graphical tools are in for a treat. The YaST package management front ends have gotten a facelift this release. It comes in a Qt version for KDE desktops and a GTK version for GNOME users. Using YaST simplifies software installation for users of all experience levels. It just takes a few mouse clicks to install any package.

In my testing, I found that both the command line and the graphical package tools worked well and were much faster than in previous releases. My only complaint is that the YaST GUI still refreshes the repository databases automatically each time it is opened. Fortunately, in this release there is a Skip Refresh button, but with the speed improvements it's usually half done by the time I grab the mouse and click it.

Conclusions

openSUSE 11.0 is a fabulous release. The pretty new graphics set the stage for significant improvements under the surface. All the time and energy put into the package management system has paid off. Including KDE 4 is not as big of a risk for openSUSE as it might be for other major distributions because of the conservative and intuitive way KDE 4 is set up. openSUSE has given me hope that I could actually like KDE 4.

As many point-0 releases, 11.0 does have bugs and rough edges. I experienced a few, and others are likely to be reported in the upcoming weeks. For the most part, the ones I encountered were insignificant, not showstoppers.

Overall, 11.0 is a commendable release. The developers have done an admirable job walking that fine line between stable and bleeding edge. If you like the latest software or wish for a nice usable KDE 4, then openSUSE 11.0 is for you. If you're completely happy with 10.3, well, perhaps you might want to wait for further reports.

Share    Print    Comments   

Comments

on Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Note: Comments are owned by the poster. We are not responsible for their content.

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 66.131.87.121] on June 20, 2008 06:28 PM
Yes, Suspend to RAM didn't work for me either (on both my desktop and laptop). But in both cases, the problem was fixed by creating the file /etc/pm/config.d/default and adding:

S2RAM_OPTS="-f"

Hope that works for you as well...

#

Re: Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 77.46.228.158] on June 23, 2008 09:57 AM
cool this worked on my toshiba tecra a8 too

#

No thanks.

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 192.147.68.236] on June 20, 2008 07:08 PM
When Novell divorces Microsoft, maybe then I'll take a look.

#

Re: No thanks.

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 84.90.182.83] on June 21, 2008 11:08 AM
"When Novell divorces Microsoft, maybe then I'll take a look."

Same thing here.

#

Re(1): No thanks.

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 89.175.165.2] on June 23, 2008 06:10 AM
Hope you will never "take a look" - we do not need you!

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 76.179.58.197] on June 20, 2008 07:22 PM
The thing about having to Ctrl-Alt-Bkspace twice is a feature, not a bug. It's in the release notes as a safeguard against accidentally killing the X server. It's configurable if you edit the xorg.conf file. Remove the line

Option "ZapWarning" "on"

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 90.202.233.34] on June 20, 2008 07:51 PM
I love OpenSUSE 11.0 already. This is my first Linux installation and it was extremely straightforward. I already had WinXp, therefore, now I am dualbooting with WinXP and openSUSE. I am in the middle of submitting my thesis and all my material are in XP. But as soon as I submit my thesis, I dont think I will ever look back to XP again. I am on Acer laptop and openSUSE found all the devices. I had tried the mandriva 2008 spring edition on a liveCD before, which could not find my intel pro wireless card. But openSUSE had no problems, probably due to the updated kernel. Anyway, all in all, an amazing distribution. I was in crisis between madriva and openSUSE, but openSUSE 11.0 won in the end. Extremely easy installation and amazing experience.

#

God! I wish they'd change that!

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 71.131.183.44] on June 20, 2008 09:49 PM
"My only complaint is that the YaST GUI still refreshes the repository databases automatically each time it is opened."

I HATE that! It's THE biggest problem with openSUSE. Everything else works fine, except for the occasional busted update which screws up the updater applet.

If I want to just install a piece of software I KNOW is available and in current version, why do I have to sit through five minutes of refreshing the repositories? That should be an OPTION, not a requirement!

Fix this, please!

#

Re: God! I wish they'd change that!

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 62.78.253.74] on June 21, 2008 01:36 AM
It does not take five minutes, maybe 10 seconds with the new faster package management.

#

Re: God! I wish they'd change that!

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 194.149.102.193] on June 21, 2008 09:01 AM
Disable autorefresh and make the refresh manually or configure it in /etc/zypp/zypp.conf.

#

Best distro

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 161.203.16.1] on June 20, 2008 10:06 PM
Since version 10 was released years ago, SUSE is by far the best pop-it-in-and-run distro. Its hardware detection, configuration tools, and default setup are all superb. It looks pretty too.

#

Broken Network on Boot

Posted by: Nate on June 21, 2008 04:34 AM
"Sometimes, though, my Internet connection, which was configured to start at boot, wouldn't be started."

The problem is with the sysconfig package. It worked fine with the default package from the 10.3 DVD. The problem starts when you either update sysconfig via official suse update repo or upgrade to 11.0. What ever the bug, it's related to the sysconfig package. I've all ready submitted a bug report here. https://bugzilla.novell.com/show_bug.cgi?id=402438

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 68.227.231.248] on June 21, 2008 07:03 AM
I have a system running 11.0 with Kde 3.5. I booted the Kde (v4) live CD and it came up with a totally different desktop than what I'm used to with 3.5. It's enough different that I will have to spend some time learning how to use it, and that doesn't help when you have things to do.

#

Interesting release but watch out for KDE4 desktop effects

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 80.4.12.138] on June 21, 2008 10:22 AM
I did two installs yesterday and I found the following points:

The installer looks extremely nice, makes smarter choices than previous installers (e.g. guessing a better timezone based on Language settings) but BE CAREFUL if you are doing custom partitioning - it is not immediately obvious which option leads you to the "Don't touch - I'm going to partition my system myself".

The installation process IS fast providing you do not have an existing home directory for the created user. If you do have such a user the changing of ownership can push up a 10-15 minute default install to 25-30 minutes.

Most of the default graphics (GRUB, Bootsplash screens shown while the system boots) look VERY polished so it is a shame that the default KDE4 login manager looks a bit shabby. It also helps if you like green.

The default KDE4 desktop has a button near the bottom left that many existing users will mistake for terminal. It's actually a show desktop/dashboard button. Most new users do not know what this does and struggle to get back to their regular desktop.

The KDE4 3D globe widget refused to start on a machine with an Intel i945 graphics card and another machine with a Geforce 7300 LE graphics card (with the binary drivers installed) complaining about lack of graphics shaders. I can understand this on the former but not the later.

I have seen cases on KDE4 where a new user was unable to log out because the leave desktop buttons stopped working. Clicking them just did nothing.

I have seen cases where on KDE4 the SUSE menu buttons at the bottom (Favourites, Applications etc) just disappeared frustrating users.

You currently can't rearrange the order of entries in the Favourites menu on KDE4.

The KDE4 desktop effects are not nearly as smooth or as plentiful as those found in compiz. Many are slow and jerky. There also seem to be major issues with them causing parts of the desktop to not be drawn correctly.

Many of the keyboard bindings people learned in KDE3 are no longer on by default in KDE4 and windows also default to shading by default when their titlebars are double clicked.

It is no longer possible to (easily) stop KNetworkmanager from starting at login. This annoys users who have fixed desktop network connections.

Moving icons around in the panel has now become a major chore (and middle mouse button drag has gone too).

The package manager finally has the speed of other top tier package managers like apt. It is far faster than the 10.3 package manager when it comes to solving dependencies and doesn't have the horrific memory/CPU sucking behaviour of the SLES10/SUSE 10.1 package manager. Fetching lists of packages seems faster too but it is a pity that EVERY TIME the GUI package manager is started it tries to fetch a list of community repositories. This masks its fast start up speed but if you are using zypper at the command line you will really see the difference.

The SUSE menu icon was shown at the bottom left hand corner of the right monitor on a two monitor setup however when the menu was actually opened it would appear at the right of the left hand monitor...

I have yet to try GNOME on openSUSE 11 nor have I tried it on a laptop so my experiences are very limited. It is unlikely that I would put a KDE4 openSUSE 11 into a lab environment though.

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 88.6.160.16] on June 21, 2008 04:15 PM
- "Novell have taken full advantage of this deal", not the community.

- "Novell made a _business_ deal with Microsoft that covers several things, one of them being customer patent protection". The patent protection is for the customers of Novell, not for the users of openSUSE. Can you say what are the patents of Microsoft that Linux is violating? Why make a deal with a company whose CEO (Ballmer) says that Linux is like a cancer in relation with the intellectual property. Do you think that software patents are good?

- An Empirical Look at Software Patents
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=461701
http://www.bu.edu/law/faculty/profiles/fullcvs/part-time/bessen_j.html

- Pro-softpatent analysts have yet to find benefit from software patents
http://endsoftpatents.org/resources-for-economists

You are doing FUD.

#

Re: Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 150.176.82.2] on July 01, 2008 02:30 AM
on my pc i have xp, slackware suse,ubuntu,fedora and mandrivia...the ones i happen to use more are Suse, ubu and fedora

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 85.243.83.218] on June 21, 2008 04:38 PM
I don't like M$ and Novell connection...and was pretty pathetic when i made a test with this distro that during installation the mouse worked perfectly and when i booted the installation, it didn't !!! Mouse completly frozzen LOL !!!

back to Ubuntu/Xubuntu/Kubuntu/UltimateEdition :)

Also...the SUSE (and Madriva and Fedora) policies about multimedia are pretty stupid if you ask me...

AJSB

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 69.109.45.81] on June 21, 2008 07:05 PM
"hardware support in Linux has all but become a non-issue"

uhhh.....I still can't run suse because it does not my support my LCD monitor hooked up via DVI

#

Pluses and Minuses

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 67.213.101.95] on June 21, 2008 09:12 PM
Having installed 11.0 (32) twice, firstly with KDE4 and secondly with KDE3.5.9, I really appreciate the fast zypper times. Quite reasonable. However, that's really the only plus from this release.

For a person who wants productivity out of a desktop, KDE4 is quite useless. Not Novell's fault, only KDE.org for listening to widget and "neat thing" fanboys/girls. I gave up in despair trying to adjust simple things like the size if the clock font, trying to put an icon/link to an app on the taskbar, and on the desktop.

The large amount of space occupied by desktop icons, and their associated "shaded square" with 4 minature, microscopic "widget icons" that do no more than we used to accomplish on a simp[le right-click are, to put it mildly, the most stupid and brain-dead "improvements" to anything that I have seen for ages.

Like I said, catering to the neat-oh kiddies. Not fit for serious use.

KDE3.5.9 was nice, the same functionally and operationally as 3.5.9 on my production 10.3 desktop. BTW, 11.0 is no faster/slower than my 10.3 installation, with or without KDE4

Neither 4.xx nor 3.5 was "faster, more stable, or enriched" as my 10.3 installation. In fact, the fonts look terrible (buzzy, stringy, Microsoftish-like) even with my attempt to fixup Freetype2 according to conventional wisdom. In comparison to my laser-like (similar to a printed page in quality!) 10.3/3.5 installation, the 11.0 implementation is something worse than DOS prompts. Needless to say, I won't be moving to 11.0 until openSuse/Novell offer a solution. Or a third-party.

BTW, to the previous poster, my Samsung 213T connected via DVI to a 8600GT is no problem in 10.3 or 11.0 installs. So I don't know what the problem is with your LCD monitor.

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0 - not

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 24.222.64.13] on June 21, 2008 09:38 PM
Kudos ? KDE4 is the most unstable and unusable garbage I have ever had the misfortune to waste bandwudth downloading . Suse is the only distro amoung a whole stack I have on my cd spindle that will not install nvidia drivers for my 7300 gt . Forget the fact that the installer finally works after several failed attempts with the beta and rc builds . Forget the fact the the huge speed increases they brag about in their softwafe installer are still pityful next to most other distros . The supposed solution to enable my graphics drivers after installing them was to open sax2 , which showed me absolutley nothing and done nothing . What in the hell is sax2 and how in the name of god is a new user supposed to know what it is for ? I can think of several Slackware distros that work better than this elephant , are more user friendly , and stable . How about a tool to simply install the damn things , is that too much to ask ?

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 85.243.83.218] on June 21, 2008 09:55 PM
Contnuing my ramblings about openSUSE....

Indeed of all Distros that i ever tested (and i tested A LOT, trust me ;) i ver saw somethinmg as slow as openSUSE 10.3 and 11.0....i have a feeling that Novell/whotever_is_trully_responsible_for_openSUSE is jealous of M$ and it's bloating "techniques"....let's face it.....openSUSE ,as for bloating goes, is the M$ of the Linux world.

AJSB

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: markthecarp on June 22, 2008 12:51 AM
Nice review. I've installed openSuSE 11.0 on my 5 year old Toshiba laptop. Learning zypper usage. Installing Ubuntu GutsyGibbon now on the same machine to do a "head to head" comparison.

My old laptop has problematic nvidia hardware; it will be interesting to see which if any gets it right.

-mark

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 24.222.64.13] on June 22, 2008 12:53 AM
It's not strictly a matter of software bloat . My Sabayon install is huge and works like a charm , as does PClinux and Linux Mint . This is just plain crap software that should not be allowed to carry the Linux name . The software installer is unintutive and slow , graphics setup is beyond pathetic , their default KDE4 desktop is incomplete and unstable , the default menu is cumbersome and ugly . In short I can find nothing in this distro that I like . Garbage like this gives Linux a bad name .

#

Re: Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 64.147.9.101] on June 22, 2008 01:01 AM
"In short I can find nothing in this distro that I like . Garbage like this gives Linux a bad name ."

Looks to me like you already had your mind made up. I installed openSUSE 11.0 on my desktop which has older hardware and am loving it! I use Gnome and compiz actually works pretty well with my nvidia Geforce 3 card (after the 1-click install of course). The software installer is great, so I don't know where the whiny complaints come from.

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 24.222.64.13] on June 22, 2008 01:14 AM
Installing the nvidia drivers then opening sax2 , as per the bloody instructions I had to google for , is not one click . Not having my card supported when every other distro has no problem with it , is a problem . If you think the software installer is great you obviously haven't used another distro is the past couple of years . Complaining about not having the garbage work is not being whiney , it's simply saying what has to be said . It's time to take our heads out of our collective asses and stop making excuses for software just because it is free . We don't need dozens of different solutions for software installers , desktops or anything else . If someone else's works better , use it . In openSUSE's case nothing in the whole OS set's it aside .

#

Re: Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 64.147.9.101] on June 22, 2008 01:31 AM
Your experiences are obviously different than many people, including mine. I didn't have any problems installing the software, and yes, installing the proprietary Nvidia driver was an extra step (albeit simple for me) but certainly not what I would consider a pain. You need to get over yourself and understand that your bad experience is YOUR bad experience. I (and others like me) are just commenting that our experiences with openSUSE 11.0 was pleasant and virtually hassle free.

"If someone else's works better , use it"

My point exactly, so stop generalizing based on your experience. I have tried a couple other distros and I like openSUSE because it works for me. : )

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 24.222.64.31] on June 22, 2008 01:46 AM
Get over myself ? The issue , obviously , is that the bloody OS will not get over my rather common hardware . If you think that having it work good on your box and not others is good software , I guess that's where we disagree . From what I'm hearing I'm far from alone in my opinions . Over and over again SUSE has acknowledged installer failures , nvidia install failures , slow package management , etc. in their own release notes . My point about using other software was that if they can't do it in house , at least use someone else s tools to get the job done .

#

Re: Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 64.147.9.101] on June 22, 2008 03:21 AM
"The issue , obviously , is that the bloody OS will not get over my rather common hardware . If you think that having it work good on your box and not others is good software ,"

Then, obviously, use another distro that works for you. That's the great thing about Linux, which I'm sure you'll agree. Of course I think it's good software if it installs and runs good on my pc, and mine is certainly not the only one, thus opensuse's growing popularity (despite what you might think and probably hope). Every distro has its issues as well as its advantages. It might not be for everyone, obviously, but then I never made that claim. I was just responding to your generalization that opensuse is "garbage".



#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 208.59.126.142] on June 22, 2008 05:32 AM
Thing of it is... Thing of it is... I might not want to migrate to another flavor of Linux after several years of using SUSE Linux. However if they keep down this path, I will have to... It's not fair.. It's just not fair...

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 118.3.186.16] on June 22, 2008 01:49 PM
Kudos? Better read the EULA for so-called "open"SUSE: http://lwn.net/Articles/283566/

Pay special attention to the "GENERAL TERMS" section which includes such Microsoft-approved terms as required you to cease use of the software at the end of the Agreement and forbidding the publication of benchmarking results,

I'm very sad for all the work and effort that went into SUSE over the years; I can understand the reluctance of those who contributed so much to acknowledge that openSUSE and Novell are no longer worth supporting but the fact of the matter is openSUSE is not "open" and Novell is no friend to Open Source.





#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 85.216.101.49] on June 22, 2008 07:16 PM
Tried it and was very disappointed.
X freezes when i try to rotate the screen.
X freezes when i run glxgears.
gnome-settings-demon repeatingly crashed.
Reporting bugs requires registration at novell.com
fuck that.

#

Rants by distroswappers

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 89.8.20.100] on June 23, 2008 12:03 AM
I sense that a great number of the rants are made by distroswappers that jump between distros and concludes on basis of a brief glance. The comments are expected blueprints of what's mouthed by MSoftusers all day long.

Unfortunately, few of the rants are carrying any substance. They merely prove that many still belives that a Distro is all about installation. (After all - that's what many people do - all the time...)

I noted a few valid critical comments about KDE 4.x - some apparently neglecting the fact that it's still in Beta. (latest packages are 4.0.82.x). Shure enough - KDE 4.x still misses applications and applications are missing features, but that should be expected by anyone serious about testing OpenSuse 11 KDE 4.x.

I find it highly relevant to discuss SuSe having been bought by Novell and also the partnership with Microsoft. I don't like it. The question is - can I live with it - and how does the alternative work.

My proposal to you who can't live with it - Do not download or install OpenSuse. Then you should become true to your principles and ethics: Start removing any applications and drivera that have been developed by Novell/Suse. Further, remove anything from projects funded by Novell. Heavy job huh?

I find it somewhat premature to approve or disapprove of OpenSuse 11 KDE 4.x as I have only used it for a coupple of weeks (including 11rc). But I can say this: The problems I've experienced are all related to KDE not being fully fledged yet. It was expected thus no big deal. My opinion is that both KDE 4 and OpenSuse 11 are very very promising and I believe that when this distro has matured for a coupple of months it will become the distro everything else is measured against.

KDE 4.x requires som patience - it needs to be learned. Face it: It is not KDE 3.5.x and it is not Gnome. Because it is not intended to be. If you don't like it - don't use it. You don't have to. I'm pretty confident that when it's fully fledged it will be a good choice for quite a few.

Any distro needs AT LEAST a month or two before it is recommendable to use it as a primary OS. For instance Ubuntu Hardy Heron 8.04 LTS is far from ready. I'll revisit when 8.04.2 arrives.

#

Installing Software openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 69.143.35.131] on June 23, 2008 01:02 AM
Great Distro, but installing software is a bad, for starters very little software, not all the applications that I need (example Mandvd, and many others) and yes I have included all the community repositories. second to many errors an dependency an possible braking other packages, never had this problems on debian testing or PclinuxOs or other distros. But yes Open suse is a very Nice looking Distro, but what can I do with That?

#

Re: Installing Software openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 64.147.9.101] on June 23, 2008 06:15 PM
"Great Distro, but installing software is a bad, for starters very little software, not all the applications that I need (example Mandvd, and many others) and yes I have included all the community repositories."

There is tons of software available for opensuse, although you might have to add a third party repository. For instance, Mandvd is available from the packman repository.

#

Re(1): Installing Software openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 69.143.35.131] on June 24, 2008 08:59 PM
Ok I found Mandvd at packman repository but is for suse 10.3 but it works, well I guess I have to wait a little until the repositories are updated.

#

Re(1): Installing Software openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 69.143.35.131] on June 26, 2008 03:56 AM
please try to install alien arena!

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 89.175.165.2] on June 23, 2008 07:13 AM
I am TOTALLY SATISFIED with 10.3 and I simply wanted to have a look at version 11.0 and if new KDE repulses me to switch back immediately.

KDE 4 turned out to be so glamorous and full of new interface features that I feel my self a little bit nonplussed:

1 - The most embarrassing thing is that i cannot copy anything directly to the desktop using copy-paste pair! for example when i click copy on a file that is on usb flash and try to paste into onto the desktop - the menu 'paste' is disabled???

2 - The other embarassing thing is that I cannot find unmount flash usb menu item.

Don't know whether mentioned above are features or bugs? have used KDE 4 for 30 minutes yet and maybe this time is not enough to get acquainted...

The most critical hardware was configured perfectly (though I've installed nvidia proprietary drivers)
- monitor Samsung '22
- vga Asus 7600 GS 512 mb
- Attansic L1 Gigabit Ethernet Controller

Firefox has automatically updated itself from beta5 to release.

I haven't decided yet whether to return to 10.3 and take a second try when 11.1 will appear or to master KDE 4 innovations right now?
Happily openSUSE 11.0 allows to install both KDE 3.5 and 4.0 concurrently.

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 192.35.35.34] on June 23, 2008 06:22 PM
I beta tested SUSE 11 and run it full time up to today. IMO, the SUSE team still has ALOT of work to do to make this release "stable". They are far better off than the Fedora guys, that is for sure, but there are still too many RC and minor bugs in the release to call it anything but unstable. If your looking to put SUSE 11 on your system full time, I recommend using the KDE3.5.9 or XFCE varients, because the GNOME2.22 and KDE4 versions are really not much more than developmental point releases. This is free software so hey, you get what you get right? Dont like it, either fix it or use something else. There is always Ubuntu/Debian if you want something that is easy to use and always works properly for the vast majority. Not wanking on the SUSE team, but the old saying, "If you cant beat um, join um" should be taken to heed here. The Ubuntu guys are obviously on to something, so it might be good to learn a thing or two from them and put some of their tools into your mix, or make them mainstream.

#

Re: Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 75.138.117.2] on June 23, 2008 10:24 PM
Yes it's a really nice looking distro but, it is very buggy at best. The web browsers (Firefox & Epiphany & Seamonkey) all crash when running websites like youtube and leaklive. Other then that it"s nice

#

Re: Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 89.8.135.158] on June 23, 2008 10:29 PM
Basicly I've only used the KDE 4.x version - KDE 4.x IS beta. Shure it needs time to harden - any distro does.

But Ubuntu in genereal and Hardy in particular is hardly the ideal reference in terms of bugs and errors. Hardy gave me more hazzle than any distro I've ever used. May be Ubuntu should pass fixes upstream rather than messing about? Let's hope for a purified Ubuntu Kernel in 9.10.

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0 ehhh what?

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 87.66.92.40] on June 25, 2008 03:08 PM
And ,did they finally fixed their ACPI problems,hahahaha,piece of advice ,don't touch that crap!

#

Comment on EULA

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 205.166.175.2] on June 26, 2008 04:03 PM
Just as an FYI, the EULA linked to above was for 11 beta 3 . . . it's only for the the pre-releases (like the text says . . .).

If you want to see the EULA for 11.0 GM, look here:
http://ftp.nluug.nl/os/Linux/distr/opensuse/distribution/11.0/repo/oss/EULA.txt

You'll notice some differences . . . there's been a lot of FUD around the 'net about the EULA for the betas . . .

#

Re: Comment on EULA

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 69.143.35.131] on June 29, 2008 09:04 PM
still sucks!!

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 58.179.213.33] on July 01, 2008 06:02 AM
I have installed OpenSuse 11 after 2 years of distro hoping and i have to say that This is the Best
Distro i have tried in a long time. I didn't like Opensuse 10.3 only because the package manager was slow, but in
OpenSuse 11 it is 10 times faster! This distro does have a couple of bugs that i've noticed, like i get a crash when i search
from the Kicker Menu sometimes, But bare in mind this is a .0 release, and there is alot of bug fixes on the way. It is not fair to judge
A distro when it is only JUST came out, Ubuntu Hardy is still full of bugs and it has been out for a couple months now, I am confident
That by 11.2 release This release will be as Stable as the 10.3 Release of OpenSuse was. I havn't run into any major problems, Everything
seems to work perfect for me, and This is Definatley My Permanent Desktop for Linux. I am using the DVD Kde 3.5 version, I'll wait a few months
before converting to Kde4 although i think they have done a great Job with KDE4 version of OpenSuse from the current state of Kde4. Its the best KDE4
Distro available at the moment.
Hats off to OpenSuse 11

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 58.179.213.33] on July 01, 2008 08:30 AM
OpenSuse 11 is Superb!
I don't know why people are whining about it, Even though its a .0 release, i havn't come across
any bugs or anything that doesn't work.
To all the people whining, How about you Write your Own Operating System then???
Im sure you can do a much better job and give it away for FREE!
idiots.

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 62.194.80.63] on July 04, 2008 12:59 PM
Intresting to read all this, am running it since its release but with KDE3 and have not had a single instability issue, but then again that is just my experiance. What I do find sily is the "its sucks" comment or "piece of crap". Please grow up, nobody forces you to use it, if it does not fit your personal taste move back to what did fit you. Ubunto did not work for me, so be it, I moved onto to OpenSuse, does not mean I spend my free time posting on Ubunto forums that they suck and made a piece of crap, like OpenSuse they doing a great job but I just had a bad experiance.

As for the fear of the novell/ms agreement, the world is not black and white, but if you want to see it that way then please do but be honest about it and remove all items in your linux distribution which come from projects funded by Novell and start shouting at your favorite linux disto if they use something from such a project. For big corperation the agreement gives them some piece of mind and has eased MS down on their Linux rant which is something all distro's are taking advantage off.

I personally like 11.0 with KDE 3.5, I will play and experiment with KDE 4 when I find the time.

#

Kudos to openSUSE 11.0

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 86.53.38.131] on July 15, 2008 08:21 PM
Really useful review. Thanks. I use 10.3 with KDE having upgraded through the 10.x's and it has continuously improved. I do use the desktop as a productivity suite for office work as well as entertainment with multimedia. I didn't find the proprietary multimedia extensions a hastle to install, just part of the general setting up.
The major problems I had with 10.3 were with KDE:
- The network manager not being able to have multiple network cards and having to fudge a pptp connection by using the Gnome manager;
-The shabby Personal Organiser: The email client is very dated, the import is awful (at least from Eudora it is) and and non-working sync/calendar software was a disaster, not only could I not synchronise my mobile phone (an S-E) but also I was unable to import the events sensibly from other sources.
Its disappointing to see that 11.0 doesn't address these issues - there was talk of the new network manager being able to handle multiple devices but it appears from the review to be broken. The email client version quoted is actually an older version than that which I have on 10.3, and the sync soft ware appears to be a collection of radical ideas - doesn't look like anything useful will be around for a while.
I am going to stick to 10.3 until basic productivity stuff like networking and the personal organiser is sorted out. 11.1 please!

#

This story has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.



 
Tableless layout Validate XHTML 1.0 Strict Validate CSS Powered by Xaraya