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Gosh, gOS is good

By Susan Linton on November 16, 2007 (4:00:00 PM)

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Many people still question whether Linux will ever make it fully into mainstream computer acceptance. A $199 computer now available on a major superstore's shelves just in time for Christmas might change all that. Anyone who wants a computer to just to send email and instant messages and watch YouTube videos should like the Everex gPC, which is powered by a nifty Linux distribution called gOS.

I downloaded a copy of gOS rather than purchase it with a new system. It comes as an installable live CD. On the desktop is an icon that opens the installer, which walks you through the install configuration. First you choose from dozens of languages and keyboard layouts, then you prepare your partition. gOS offers to import your settings from other systems, such as wallpapers, My Documents, and Firefox settings, but I'm not sure that part is working just yet. Next, you set up a user account and bootloader. There is no package selection; the entire system is installed. Afterwards you can reboot or continue using the live CD.

The boot process is unmistakably Ubuntu with a color and graphics change. However, the desktop is a customized version of Enlightenment DR17, one of the most underrated and underexposed desktop environments available. goS puts many of its advanced options and features to good use.

The desktop and applications

The gOS desktop has areas containing panels or docks for applets called "shelves" and launchers called "gadgets." Shelves can be arranged anywhere around the desktop. Some gadgets include a clock, networking applet, battery monitor, and temperature gauge. Start, iBox, and iBar are also considered gagdets. Start is the menu start button, iBoxes contain minimized application, and iBars contain scrollable application launchers enhanced with some visual effects, such as throbbing on mouse-over and exploding when clicked.

The gOS iBar is located at the bottom of the screen and features quick launchers for many popular Web sites and services, including Meebo, Facebook, YouTube, Wikipedia, Blogger, and Google tools such as Gmail, Docs, Maps, News, and Calendar. Some other icons open applications such as Firefox, Skype, Rhythmbox, and Xine. Their behavior is completely customizable through the My Settings -> Applications -> IBar Applications configuration. I changed my settings to remove Facebook, Meebo, and Blogger and add OpenOffice.org Writer, the GIMP, and UXterm.

The second shelf to be preconfigured is located on the right side of the screen and by default contains Exalt and Clock. Exalt is Enlightenment's answer to KDE's KNetworkManager. It lists all your network devices and allows you to configure them, then lists available connections and allows you to connect to them. Then at boot, it will connect to the last chosen connection automatically.

The simpliest way to add gadgets to your shelf is to right-click on the shelf and navigate the menu to shelf 8 -> Configure shelf contents. I added Battery and Cpufreq to monitor battery life and the speed of my CPU. Some other available gadgets include Start, system Temperature, and a Pager to navigate to other desktops.

At the top of the screen are icons and the Google Search Widget, which performs a Google search and outputs the results in Webrunner, a scaled-down browser without an address bar, icons, or navigational buttons -- which diminishes the usefulness of this applet quite a bit. Very few times have I searched for a topic and not needed the back button. It would be much more useful if the widget opened the full Firefox browser.

In addition to Internet apps, gOS comes with several nice everyday desktop applications as well. I've already mentioned OpenOffice.org, GIMP, and UXterm. There are lots of 2-D games, such as Solitare, Chess, Mahjongg, Mines, Same GNOME, Gnometris, Sudoku, and Tetravex. Mozilla Thunderbird is included for email and Pidgin for instant messaging. GnomeBaker is in the menu for burning CDs and DVDs.

I also mentioned Xine and Rhythmbox as being launchable from the iBar. Rhythmbox is a sound application for playing audio of just about any format. I was able to play audio CDs as well as local MP3s. I liked Rhythmbox because it came with some Internet radio stations preconfigured as well. All can be enjoyed with colorful visualizations.

Xine is a video movie player. I was able to play AVI and MPEG movie files. DVD decryption is not included due to digital rights management restrictions in some countries. Decryption downloads are available outside of the US and are not difficult to install.

If you want other applications, the Synaptic Package Manager is included, with Ubuntu and gOS repositories set up and ready for use. I used it to install ndiswrapper-common, ndiswrapper-utils, and restricted-manager. I used the Restricted Manager to install the Nvidia proprietary graphic drivers for my video chip and the Ndiswrapper tools to enable my wireless Ethernet chip.

Hardware support

I wasn't sure what hardware support to expect when I booted gOS. Would it have been scaled down to work solely on the Everex gPC? I was happy to find most of my HP Pavilion dv6105 hardware supported out of the box, as with any Linux distribution.

My sound worked upon boot, as did my touchpad, extra USB mouse, and wired Ethernet. My graphics adapter worked, but it was using a resolution of 1024x768. gOS provides a screen configuration tool, but it too only went up to 1024x768. To get more screen real estate, I edited my /etc/X11/xorg.conf file as I commonly do to achieve the settings I wish. This worked well, until the next boot, when the xorg.conf file was overwritten and the setting went back to the 1024x768 default. After some trial and error, I decided the best (or easiest) solution to this was to edit the /usr/sbin/xdebconfigurator file, which is a human-readable Perl script. Now, at each boot, a new xorg.conf file is still written, but it is written with my desired settings. This is the one area I predict will give new users a problem.

My wireless Ethernet setup was easy. After installing the Ndiswrapper packages, I was able to extract, load the drivers, and see my card was detected. Using Exalt, I set up the WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access) type and password. It connected to my router, and, after boot, from then on.

Under gOS Enlightenment, when you insert a removable device or disk, such as a USB flash drive, an icon appears on the desktop, and you can click the icon to open the contents in Fileman, Enlightenment's file manager. I could make a directory, drag and drop my files on it, and delete others as one would expect. When I finished, I closed the window and right-clicked the icon, looking for the Safely Remove or Unmount option. They and nothing similar was there. When I started up a terminal session to manually unmount the device, I saw it was no longer mounted. It turns out that removable devices are automatically umounted upon closing the window. That's handy for new users, but there are drawbacks too. The mounted devices are give strange dynamic alphanumerical directory names, and the Fileman window must be open if you want to use a device's contents in other applications.

Another wonderful surprise found was the advanced powersaving features enabled and working out of the box. CPU scaling (reduced CPU speed to save battery life), suspend to RAM, and hibernate worked with no tweaking required.

Other system and settings tools

gOS provides several handy system tools in the Administration menu. Some of these include Language Support (many languages are supported), Login Window, Network Tools, Parititon Editor, Printing, Screens and Graphics, System Monitor,and Update Manager.

The Printing setup tool is an easy and functional graphical Python application that walks users through configuring their printers. I used it to set up a Samba networked printer. Using the scan option, it quickly detected and listed the available printers. I chose the working device, picked out the driver, and printed a test page.

The Update Manager and Notifier are the same ones found in Ubuntu. The Update Notifier informs users of system or application updates, while the Update Manager completes the upgrades. There were a few updates available during my testing period, and the Update Manager performed the Ubuntu upgrades with no problem, but the gOS repository mirrors were always down.

The distribution exposes many desktop-specific settings in Configuration -> My Settings -- a container for the modules that customize the look and functionality of Enlightenment. From there you can change wallpapers, themes, icons, fonts, and cursors. You can set up which applications are available from the iBar or started upon login. Under the Screen subheading you can set the number of virtual desktops, the screen resolution, and power management preferences. My Settings also allows changes in the menus, File Manager behavior, window functions, and more.

In the iBar is a Q&A icon that leads to a gOS Web site that's a cross between a user help forum and a wiki. It allows gOS users to ask questions and receive answers from other users. Right now there are only a few questions and even fewer answers.

Conclusion

I really liked gOS. It's a cute little system with lots of functionality and great looks. It works well and is fast and stable on my laptop. It should work on any computer that any other Linux supports. Enlightenment is an impressive desktop environment, and the iBar is a low-overhead way to blend cool effects with needed functionality. I think users will like it.

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on Gosh, gOS is good

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 63.145.102.10] on November 16, 2007 07:10 PM
systems is still a lil glitchy maybe cause enlightenment isn't yet in it's final release version- btw they also didn't add thumbs to there login windows. A few customizations in the back end could have even sped things up for them a lil better- but these are only minor complaints on the whole.

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Re: Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 80.6.16.101] on November 20, 2007 11:21 PM
It looks quite good but it actually runs slower than Ubuntu. Everything lags. The PC I tried it on was only 500mhz PIII with 256mb RAM so it needs a much more powerful PC to be any good. I thought enlightenment would have been less memory/resource hungry than KDE & Gnome.

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Re(1): Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 195.148.60.62] on November 22, 2007 10:59 AM
Something is definetly not right on your system. I found gOS (installed normally from cd) to be a lot faster than vanilla Ubuntu. But when I installed greenos-desktop(?) (that is/will be gOS meta-package for Ubuntu) on my Ubuntu install, I found that extremely slow.

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gOS

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 69.72.111.2] on December 30, 2007 07:01 PM
does anyone know is gOS is good for gamein?>

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OMG they are really doing it

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 91.89.37.65] on November 16, 2007 07:16 PM
Well. So I can admit that Google really changed desktop computing.

Reading gOS website that they sell not really computer - but access to Google.

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Excellent Review on gOS

Posted by: Michael E Perks on November 16, 2007 09:42 PM
Great review and a nifty little OS. This OS is targeting those that just want to read a blog and browse their mail as well as look at Youtube. If Google has those tools why not point to them.. <grin>
[Modified by: Michael E Perks on November 16, 2007 09:43 PM]

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 209.21.118.190] on November 16, 2007 10:40 PM
Interesting. I downloaded the ISO and loaded it up in VMWARE.

PROS :
(1) Clean layout
(2) Uses / utilizes Google utilities and apps (GMAIL via Firefox, Google News via Firefox, Instant messenger via Firefox ... see the pattern?)
(3) Useful and uncluttered menu structure
(4) Nice selection of apps; having OpenOffice pre-installed is nice.

CONS:
(1) For the life of me I could NOT find any control panel / settings widget/gadget/whatever to set the time and date. NTP kicked in to set up
the time/date automatically, but what if you're not on the net?
(2) Although I'm an Enlightenment fan (the window system gOS uses), since it isn't the same as KDE or GNOME (no "control panel", for example)
People who buy this machine / combination will have a bit of a time getting help from their neighborhood LINUX guru.

I would have customized GNOME (or KDE) had I been doing the gOS out-of-the-box configuration.
(3) Given that this is meant to be a beginner's machine, I would also have expected a bit more help popping up when first loaded.

It is great to have a LINUX box at a very low entry price ($200). I hope this will further the LINUX on the desktop movement.
[Modified by: Anonymous on November 16, 2007 10:44 PM]

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Re: Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 74.79.152.152] on November 19, 2007 09:03 PM
I think if you are not on the net, this isn't for you.
How do you use the google apps if your not on the net.

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Re(1): Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 91.106.172.182] on November 24, 2007 09:19 PM
But could the same not be said for just about any current OS? Updates to the OS, patches for whatever software you are using, registration etc.. Its pretty much an assumption that you have internet access. The last game I bought before I left Windows needed a download on the release day. Over 100Meg as far as I remember.

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 207.106.86.85] on November 16, 2007 10:46 PM
I'll be the 1st party poooper.
I don't think that "To get more screen real estate, I edited my /etc/X11/xorg.conf file" and "mainstream computer acceptance" go together.
But it's a start in the right direction...

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 207.106.86.85] on November 16, 2007 11:05 PM
Manually editing xorg.conf - is that the suggested mainstream end-user behavior?
For experienced Linux user this should not be an issue. What about a complete noob?
In order to get internet apps you'd want DSL or Cable broadband - both of my high-speed ISPs say they don't support Linux - what's next?

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Re: Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 24.20.120.163] on November 17, 2007 06:43 AM
My experience with cable broadband and dsl is you order it and then plug in the ethernet cable to your modem directly or into the router that plugs into the modem. The operating system is not relevant in this scenario.

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Linux and cable modems

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 70.126.228.159] on November 17, 2007 11:26 AM
Exactly - your OS doesn't matter at all. However, the new users don't know that, and my cable modem company (RoadRunner) seems to disavow all knowledge of the existence of Linux. I have sometimes gotten some flack when calling in problems, such as service outages after lightning strikes, when the person on the other end of the phone starts by taking down info like OS, browser, email client, etc. and I answer "Debian Sid/Unstable", "Konqueror", "KMail", etc. However, the tech people themselves don't seem to give a rip what I'm running - if they need to test anything, they just plug their own laptop into the cable modem.

The gOS target users might be more of a problem, because they may not be able to figure out if a problem is within their computer or a problem with the internet service.

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Re: Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 91.106.185.207] on November 17, 2007 12:38 PM
Not supporting Linux, means they do not provide the technical support required to get you going if you muck up your network settings. Not that they will not allow you to use a Linux computer on their service. Big difference. My ISP doesn't support Linux either, but I am currently using Firefox in Fedora 8 to write this on my Broadband ADSL connection with a mainstream ISP. Don't tell anybody, or the internet might realize that I am a paradox.

In about 9 years of internet use, I have only ever called my ISP about connection problems at their end. During which time they took me through the usual Windows fault finding stuff before eliminating my system being at fault and ordering the line check.
Later on Linux, saying that I had booted from a live CD and reset my own router was enough to verify that the fault was at their end and avoid the usual scripted response and get the line check initiated. The only other possible reason to call the ISP support lines would be for account queries. Most routers and Ethernet modems are just as easy to set up as a USB modem, if not easier, and all you need are your user name and password. Linux will set everything else up automatically. If anything, its easier than Windows.

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Re: Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 71.226.237.140] on November 18, 2007 07:30 AM
Thank you for replies. When I posted this, I did not mean that it does not work (I use Linux and OpenSolaris myself and have no troubles to get to the net). It was in context of "mainstream acceptance". As far as I remember: with both Verizon and Comcast, I needed an account activation software, which they provide for Win or Mac only (I dual-boot). The other funny story was: I got a call from Verizon about their FIOS internet service, when I answered that I run Linux the telemarketing person was confused and only with the supervisor's help informed me that they don't support it. How that fits into "mainstream acceptance"? And how many of the surprised buyers (who just wanted a cheap PC) would be like "oops, this is not Windows"?

I also wonder how many of those gOs PCs will get WinXP on them immediately after the purchase (legal or pirated, does not matter)?

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 24.158.189.106] on November 17, 2007 02:25 AM
I gotta admit, when I heard of gOS the first thought in my head was "oh god, i bet they made some watered down screwed up version of linux to provide to the masses" but i tried it to and I was happily impressed. While not the most advanced distribution ever, it still includes package management and a terminal so you can pretty much make this system into a normal Ubuntu system (or pretty close). I am really impressed with their implementation of enlightenment. Its fast, smooth, looks great and they've included some very nice usability features as mentioned in the article. As reported earlier this week, the online warehouse sold out in a week! People like this thing, and I don't blame them. For $200?!? I mean, my GOD! You won't find ANY sort of decent Windows machine that cheap, anywhere... period. This is perfect for students and grandparents or just people that aren't really that geeky (like me) that just want a simple, cheap machine to do their web browsing and email on. There's not a whole lot of negative anyone can possibly say about gOS or the Everex machine it was built for.

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Re: Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 71.226.237.140] on November 18, 2007 08:00 AM
I would not get too enthusiastic about "gOS" factor here. The cheap price is THE MAJOR FACTOR (specially if you happen to own an XP/Win2K install disk already).

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segfaults if your folders get too big

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 76.181.200.77] on November 17, 2007 02:32 AM
Which isn't going to be really nice to all those Everex users who start ripping their CDs. After trying this OS out, which I generally liked, I started migrating my MP3 collection off of windows, just trying things out. There is no "select all" option available, so albums had to be selected one at a time. After about 20 or so, the "Music" folder segfaulted and would accept no more input. I was also able to reproduce this in a Pictures and Documents folder.

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"segfaults"???

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 70.126.228.159] on November 17, 2007 11:34 AM
Um, what exactly do you mean by "the 'Music' folder segfaulted"? A segmentation fault is something that causes a _program_ to crash when an invalid pointer gets dereferenced. What program crashed? Anyway, if it is a reproducible problem, you should file a bug report.

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Re: "segfaults"???

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 76.181.200.77] on November 17, 2007 08:55 PM
It's the damndest thing, and puzzles me too, which is why I mention it. But once any folder (in this case it just happens to be a folder I named Music) reaches a certain size (not very large, but I haven't been able to to nail it precisely), trying to add to, or delete anything in, that folder fails and produces a segfault message from E17. I can't file a bug report because I uninstalled it shortly after finding that ;-)

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Re(1): "segfaults"???

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 66.26.91.67] on November 18, 2007 07:28 PM
Thats weird because I have a 15 gig MP3 folder on my HD that I named My Music and it works fine. And I have tried everything to get it to seg fault and it wont do it. Maybe its your RAM?

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Weak review

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 203.84.188.10] on November 17, 2007 03:13 AM
Weak review. Screenshots should have been included.

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Re: Weak review

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 74.249.228.213] on November 19, 2007 08:51 PM
I sent one with the review. I'm not sure what happened. We (my gmail & linux.com) were having some mail issue at the time and perhaps it was filtered out or something. I wondered why it wasn't shown too. I apologize. I have lots of screenshots at http://www.tuxmachines.org/gallery/v/gos/ .

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 24.20.120.163] on November 17, 2007 06:40 AM

Seems like "GoogleOS"

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 75.111.39.132] on November 17, 2007 07:21 AM
This is a decent review of the OS. I tried it after reading this review. The live CD booted on an old AMDK6-2 450MHz laptop with 192MB RAM, and ran well. I couldn't get *buntus to boot live on that machine at all. This OS is what Google should use as their OS, as it strongly promotes Google programs, which is just fine for the newbies. Kudos for the building of the computer, tailoring a Linux Distro for it, and for the success of selling-out their stock of the machines quickly. This shows that Linux is, indeed ready for the desktop, ready for laptops, and ready for the masses.
Cheers!

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 78.96.112.11] on November 17, 2007 11:46 AM
/usr/sbin/xdebconfigurator is a system file, you should not modify it.
Instead,do this :
echo "ENABLE_AT_BOOT=false" >/etc/default/xdebconfigurator
(sudo -i before executing the command to become root).
That's all, at the next boot it will not run.

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 65.114.105.164] on November 17, 2007 06:33 PM
I downloaded gOS and using k3b burnt my cd with DAO/SAO option and of course at 8x, it passed the md5sum check as it
should then I booted the livecd and found that it automatically detected all my laptop's hardware.. I was surprised when I found that it had configured it correctly with my wifi's essid and I was able to reach the google web page without any adjustments.
The desktop with its quick shortcuts to google and its applications were a nice feature and surfing the internet could not of been easier, My laptop is a Sony Vaio PCG-V505EX here is my infobash
, up to this point only kanotix could do this but
it doesn't use enlightenment and doesn't have the nice shortcuts to google but it is my favorite OS but this gOS has lots
of potential.

infobash -v3 0
Host/Kernel/OS "Newsroom" running Linux 2.6.22-10-kanotix i686 [ KANOTIX 2007 Thorhammer ]
CPU Info Intel Pentium M 1024 KB cache flags( sse sse2 ) clocked at [ 600.000 MHz ]
Videocard ATI M9+ 5C61 [Radeon Mobility 9200 (AGP)] X.Org 7.1.1 [ 1024x768 @60hz ]
Network cards Intel 82801DB PRO/100 VE (MOB) Ethernet Controller, at port: 4000
Intel PRO/Wireless 2200BG Network Connection
Processes 133 | Uptime 4days | Memory 346.2/502.3MB | HDD Generic USB SD Reader,Generic USB CF Reader,Generic USB SM Reader,ATA Hitachi HTS54126,Generic USB MS Reader,Sony MSC-U04 Size 62GB (35%used) | Client Shell | Infobash v2.67

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Excellent review !

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 41.234.211.169] on November 17, 2007 09:50 PM
like it and installing gOS right away !

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gOS review on 3 machines

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 99.249.156.5] on November 18, 2007 05:35 PM
I ran the live cd on three different machines. here is the video review
http://ubuntubyhand.blogspot.com/

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Gosh, gOS is good, no it 'aint

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 142.167.14.31] on November 18, 2007 08:02 PM
All I get is the message that there are licencing problems and it cannot load any video drivers. Rather pointless

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"Gosh, gOS is good"...but...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 24.126.3.61] on November 19, 2007 12:53 AM
I've just tried gOS and must say that it's a nice Linux os. It does look nice and would like to see some of the other distros adopt the Enlightenment gui. But gOS still needs some tweaking here and there. For instance, the run command window, at least on my system, was lacking some option buttons and there seems to be a lack of root options, except for certain things. I can understand this since its aimed at the every day PC user, but still like when I did the updates after I installed the gOS, it said that I needed to modify the source list in the apt-get folder. When I tried this, I couldn't because I needed to be in root to accomplish this. Maybe once these are fixed and the os has had time to mature maybe I will give it a second look.

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 72.8.64.24] on November 19, 2007 01:04 AM
after using gOS for a couple days I must say I would not recommend it for new users of Linux. Enlightenment E17 is still far too buggy to use as a window manager. There are so many segmentation faults and the file manager is a joke. A better solution would have been to put regular Ubuntu or Xubuntu on these computers rather than something that looks pretty but will cause a lot of trouble for new users. A nice idea but poor choice of Desktop Enviroment.

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Gosh, gOS is good - not

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 72.8.64.24] on November 19, 2007 04:20 AM
The problem with Linux reviews is that they are done by people that know Linux. If a computer novice that bought one of these cheap pc's did the review we would get a totally different perspective.. Just look at the questions already appearing on the gOS site.. things like where did my clock go...etc. I cant believe for a distribution that is aimed at new users they don't include a volume control or a text editor. Linux may be getting closer to being for the masses but this distro certainly is not. All they did is add Enlightenment on Ubuntu and they call it a distro.. anyone can do that in about 5 minutes. It would have been much better for Ubuntu or PClinuxOS or one of the major distros to get this deal rather than some startup.

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BLAG is even better

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 24.248.89.66] on November 19, 2007 04:23 PM
In my not so humble opinion, the Fedora based BLAG is a stronger system all around then Ubuntu. Yes it may seem a bit more hacker then the we are the world of Ubuntu.. Anyways, yes you can get <a href="http://www.thelinuxstore.ca/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=1244">a free CD</a> sent to you.

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Re: BLAG is even better

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 75.134.124.147] on November 25, 2007 04:49 AM
just came across blag a week or so ago. simply awesome and simple, which is how i like things. stuff works out of the box way better than ubuntu also.

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 70.243.40.114] on November 19, 2007 05:28 PM
5 minutes to create my own distro...u stupid! I'm not a Linux zealot or Linux super user but I'm not that dumb to think that!! What's your ultimate objection to this OS? I'm a Windows user and been looking for past 3 years for good OS for desktop. This is the best looking one for me. Gnome / KDE for all distros is all the same so its good this one mixes it up - good looking for sure (doesn't necessarily have to be green either - just layout). FYI, I prefer CentOS 5.0 at the moment with Crossover Linux as my Linux system, but still Windows overall due to the applications I have.

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 72.8.64.24] on November 19, 2007 06:58 PM
It doesn't take long to create your own distro if you are using already released software. For instance in this case, they are using Ubuntu as a base and installing Enlightenment as a window manager. Sure there are other tweaks and theme stuff but its not hard to do.

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 72.8.64.24] on November 19, 2007 07:06 PM
There really isn't anything wrong with this distro per se...except that they are using Enlightenment as their desktop environment which is still in beta. I have tried E17 many times and always stop using it after a few days due to the sheer number of bugs and crashes. One of the benefits to using Linux is its robustness...if you take that away there are fewer reasons to use it. Gnome/KDE/XFCE or just a plain window manager like Fluxbox/icewm with some enhancements, would have been a better choice for a solid computer experience.

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 10.182.60.161] on November 19, 2007 10:59 PM
I am continually surprised how many Linux users are looking for more of the same thing from every new Linux distro. Read forum discussions just about anywhere when the talk is about a new distro and you'll primarily see people complaining how it doesn't measure up to such and such a distro because it doesn't have the same *whatever*. Let's let gOS figure out how to get to where the want to go. Let's applaud how well they have done with essentially their first release. And if we see room for improvement, let's join the community and be a part of the solution. And lets let gOS and their community build their own path and watch as it grows. I think they may have something special here. But if it gets torn down it will probably not be Windows users doing the tearing, but users of other Linux distros.

Also, if you are a serious tester of gOS, please share with the gOS devs regarding your 'buggy' crashing systems so they can find a solution. I have been using gOS on my 3 year old HP system for nearly 2 weeks and Exalt is the only issue I have had. (For whatever reason I can not click on Exalt to access networking, but I can use the Run option or command line to bring the program up.)

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gOS IS Ubuntu in discuise

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 90.203.214.218] on November 19, 2007 11:50 PM
I love gOS. I know that I can finally use it to introduce my mum to Linux by way of an Internet machine. The thing that I like about it most is that it IS Ubuntu Gutsty Gibbon. This is a type of unification that is actually good for Linux to some degree. And its good for gOS and its users, they don't have to rely upon another small company to update it, extend it, so on and so forth. They have the whole Ubuntu community for that, they can just concentrate on the customers that they think will appreciate their work. They did a great job. If I want to install, Atlantik, its there, if not, its not there by default.

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Re: Ubuntu is better

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 195.148.60.62] on November 22, 2007 11:39 AM
You just forgot that gOS IS Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon with different desktop environment.

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 70.178.27.23] on November 23, 2007 02:15 AM
well the real test is slackware if it runs slackware then it is good hardware

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 88.10.76.53] on November 25, 2007 09:26 AM
Just go with one of the MODERN Unixes. ie PC BSD. POWERFUL. Security MS only lies about. PC BSD has many pre-configured pkgs that just WORK. I have to use MS IE ( yuk!) for the secure server I have to work with. PC BSD has it!!
Again it works. The other program I HAVE to have is Skype. Again it just works right out of the box. ALL the other uses for a PC database, word-processing,

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Gosh, gOS is good - Kiwi is better

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 193.226.6.226] on November 25, 2007 11:07 AM
I would just chose Kiwi Linux (http://kiwilinux.org) for such a pc everex were offering...
I'm not agree with the idea that gOS suits everyday users needs. IMHO it is limited :-/

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Re: Gosh, gOS is good - Kiwi is better

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 79.113.87.242] on November 27, 2007 08:59 AM
I also use Kiwi, and i'm perfectly satisfied with it. Kiwi is a good choise for those, who like ubuntu but don't need to act on as USA law says. So Kiwi is great in EUROPE!!!

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Re: Steve Ballmer - 'Gosh, this is ridiculous' comment

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 158.135.8.21] on November 26, 2007 10:37 PM
Couldn't find much on the specs?? What a feeble excuse for being uninformed, while still running your mouth. Sounds like simple internet search tasks are beyond your abilities, so I would assume a machine like this would be as well.

. A single search engine use would have told you "the machine has a 1.5GHz Via CPU, 512MB of DDR2 RAM, an 80GB hard drive, a DVD-ROM/CD-RW drive and stereo speakers, but no monitor included. It has G-OS Linux and Open Office loaded." The same search engine would have told you that gOS was created by, among other things, combining Ubuntu OS and the Enlightenment DR17 desktop environment. A far cry from being 'some freebie hacked up freeware.'

But thanks for uninspired, uninformed, and unintelligent trolling. You amused us greatly.

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Re(1): Steve Ballmer - 'Gosh, this is ridiculous' comment

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 155.104.37.17] on November 30, 2007 08:36 PM
Trolling maybe.... more likely an "in character" representation of Fake Steve Balmer who with every sense of the word "sarcasm" is criticizing this because it isn't Microsoft.

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 194.106.39.194] on November 30, 2007 10:25 AM

New Forum

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 71.81.65.217] on December 05, 2007 11:38 PM
There's a new forum dedicated to gOS located at http://gosforums.org

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 64.220.44.110] on December 14, 2007 10:14 PM
You should try gOS on either the Wal-Mart Everex PC or the ClubIT development board.
It works very well and rather fast on those systems.
I have the development board with the gOS Initial G release DVD and it installs and not only works, but it immediately uses all of my 1600x1050 wide screen without any further configuration.
Next time you post a review try actually using the product as it's intended to be distributed--that is, with a PC or the development board.

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 74.139.105.214] on December 20, 2007 08:09 AM
Somebody......... Hell. ANYBODY! Just shoot me!!

Scan thru the foregoing posts and you'll see geek trails. Some of us aren't geeks. Some of us want it to just work, out of the box.

I D'L'd and burned to disk the most recent version of gOS I could find today. Installed it, pretty much trouble-free. Except.... there was no way to connect to the internet. At least not that I could find. Google aps galore be damned! What's the point if connecting is some kind of "double secret" insider joke?

gOS LOOKS promising.

Remember that thing that warns about judging a book by its cover?

Take it to heart.

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gOS any good for gameing?

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 69.72.111.2] on December 30, 2007 07:04 PM
can gOS run games? or is it a poopy system to download 1 or 2 games on

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 24.179.93.96] on December 30, 2007 07:30 PM
I dowloaded gOs several hours ago with gOs dual partitioned with Windows XP. Everything seems to work fine so far! Last week, I downloaded Ubuntu 7.10 and worked with it for three days. I found the native Ubuntu to be somewhat irritating at times and eventually went back to Windows XP (I had Ubuntu installed on the entire hard drive). Today, after installing gOs, I find it much easier to work with than the native Ubuntu (I'm new to Linux). Since gOs is based on Ubuntu, I figured that Linspire's CNR Warehouse would work also, so I downloaed CNR. So far, CNR is working fine with gOs and I downloaded Mozilla Thunderbird to test it. Thunderbird downloaded just as it was suppose to. I was surprised in that when I downloaded a few apps with Ubuntu, I had a very difficult time finding those apps that I downlooded and some I just could not find at all. I figured that those problems were just due to me being new to Linux.
The really surprising thing is, I find gOs much easier to work with than Linspire! I actually paid for and downloaded Linspire 6.0 figuring that Linspre would be the easiest way to transition to Linux....wrong! In all actuality, I found Ubuntu easier to work with than Linspire, and now gOs easier than Ubuntu. Of course, much of this may be due to the different windows managers, such as Linspire's KDE and Ubuntu's Gnome.
In conclusion, I think gOs is by far the most user friendly linux distro out there, and for me, Enlightenment DR17 the easier of the windows managers. I highly recommend gOs to anyone looking to transition from MS Windows to Linux!!!!!!

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Gosh, gOS is good

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 130.68.85.152] on January 09, 2008 07:13 PM
i have a question dose this need another operating system required to run this operating system or could it be used for say a computer that has little room

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Gosh, gOS is good, maybe if i could get it going

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 68.143.203.130] on January 23, 2008 01:53 PM
i downloaded it from two of its mirrors and neither one would boot from the cd. can someone please provide a place for me to download a working copy from? I would like to give a good look although i'm quite happy with mandriva right now.

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Gosh, gOS dowload takes too long --- pick another Ubuntu/Debian based desktop Linux

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 87.194.118.218] on February 13, 2008 08:28 AM
They need to get the download sorted out --- all the links to mirrors didn't work, the torrent (argh !) worked and that was as slow as treacle, at the moment it is showing over 6 hours to complete the download, I have a fast web connection and normally I can download bigger Linux ISO in 15 minutes. Update now 22 minutes into the download ---- expect time to finish is now 9 hours !!! --- I give up.

This OS is supposed to be backed unofficially by Google --- what are they playing at no wonder only 25,000 copies have been download (13/Feb/08)

The web has lots of good free Linux/Solaris/BSD versions available on much quicker hosts --- If you want a good Debian/Ubuntu based distro for desktop use by a noobie download Mint Linux or Mepis. You will have either downloaded up and running and installed to hard disk within 30 minutes.

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