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Feature: Business

Computer Take Back Campaign places recycling responsibility on manufacturers

By Bruce Byfield on September 26, 2007 (5:02:00 PM)

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What would happen if manufacturers were responsible for the disposal of their used-up products? The Computer Take Back Campaign (CTBC), a coalition of environmental groups across the United States, hopes that the result would be both a national recycling network and the removal of hazardous materials like lead, mercury, and brominated flame retardants from products so that companies would not have to worry about them later. The CTBC has been promoting this idea with limited success since 2002, but this year it finally seems on the brink of acceptance.

Bruce Byfield is a computer journalist who writes regularly for Linux.com.
Read more at: ITManagersJournal.com

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on Computer Take Back Campaign places recycling responsibility on manufacturers

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The obvious answer

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 169.233.25.226] on September 26, 2007 06:08 PM
What would happen if manufacturers were responsible for the disposal of their used-up products?

The manufacturers will pass the costs onto the consumer, which will decrease sales, and, on a larger scale, adversely affect the economy.

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Re: The obvious answer

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 12.31.202.4] on September 26, 2007 07:42 PM
Yet you forget that allow that kind of pollution to propagate is really just a cost to society, and perhaps there *should* be decreased sales. Also, the "adversely affect the economy" argument implies that we should have no pollution controls as well.

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Re(1): The obvious answer

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 169.233.25.226] on September 27, 2007 12:30 AM
Yet you forget that allow that kind of pollution to propagate is really just a cost to society

Please don't put words in my mouth.
I personally believe there should not be government pollution controls, and that in a free market economy,
the consumers would opt for cleaner choices to make their voices heard.
It seems my vote means less and less as the days pass.

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Re(2): The obvious answer

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 83.72.129.159] on September 27, 2007 12:36 PM
Up until now consumers have proved you to be wrong. The group you call consumers is an easily manipulated herd of sheep.

I'm still waiting for a free market to happen, when we stop blocking out the third world with toll barriers only to sustain our own wealth. "We" sickens me.

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Computer Take Back Campaign places recycling responsibility on manufacturers

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 209.64.87.68] on September 26, 2007 08:21 PM
Well what would happen then is all these hazardous waste of lead and mercury would be collected and dumped in a under developed country like India, Bangaldesh or sub-Saharan Africa. It ik okay for those countries to be polluted but not USA.

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Re: Computer Take Back Campaign places recycling responsibility on manufacturers

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 83.72.129.159] on September 27, 2007 12:44 PM
Actually they pay you to take your e-trash and recycle it. There is money in recycling and a lot of valuable metals. Yet, I still don't like this proposal. It assumes that a company is a static object, which is plain wrong. Companies are turned off and on between having bought a product and getting rid of it. People should pay their own recycling fees when they turn in their old electronic (which is actually worth money).

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Computer Take Back Campaign places recycling responsibility on manufacturers

Posted by: nanday on September 26, 2007 09:23 PM
Would sales really decrease? When computers are so cheap these days, and so essential?

Anyway, within a few years, the alternative to paying for computer takeback is likely to be to pay a recycling fee yourself. One way or the other, you'll probably have to pay for disposal of ewaste.

- Bruce Byfield ("nanday")

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Final Sale is critical

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: unknown] on September 27, 2007 02:29 AM
The principle of final sale is a vital part of a free economy, without it each manufacturer becomes their own niche monopolist - this is the basis for the ongoing, and unmitigated Microsoft monopoly. Without the principle of final sale you are enslaved to the manufacturer, you are legally bound......to do as they wish, and only as they with. All innovation from Schumpeter's creative destruction - the engine of the American economy will be gone.

There are better ways - reguire an option on recycle be bundled, use incentives. Don't give up your freedom to pursue happiness - nor mine.

Damn socialist and oligarchs.

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Computer Take Back Campaign places recycling responsibility on manufacturers

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 69.158.13.203] on September 27, 2007 05:28 AM
Well there are the "three R's ...reduce, re-use and recycle" with recycle being the last option on the list. Not buying as much "stuff" or buying "stuff" that's going to last is the first choice for consumers...and recycling an obvious second. The use of free software can help keep old computers running and useful for long periods of time. That's why Windows Vista is going to be a major contributor to e-waste...big, bloated and requiring that most folks buy a new computer in order to run it.

Recycling is the last option. But perhaps paying some "deposit" cost up front may be required. When I buy beer, there's a "deposit" on the beer cans and bottles. When I return them, I get my money back (so I can buy more beer!)

Used computers and cellphones are always talked about when mentioning e-waste. But what's being largely ignored are all of the analog TV sets that are going to get tossed over the next decade as the world gradually shifts to digital TV's. "Over-the-air" analog TV transmitters will be shut off in February, 2009 in the U.S. and within a few years in alot of other countries. We're going to have a mountain of old TV sets on our hands. Anyone have any ideas on how to re-use old analog TV sets?

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Re: Computer Take Back Campaign places recycling responsibility on manufacturers

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 129.240.235.122] on September 27, 2007 02:07 PM
We're going to have a mountain of old TV sets on our hands. Anyone have any ideas on how to re-use old analog TV sets?


Keep using them and buy a set-top box with an analogue output, of course. Or has the unfettered American electronics industry been advocating the trashing of your old stuff in favour of shiny new stuff for no good reason? I guess that's another reason to make them take responsibility for the entire product lifecycle.

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Re(1): Computer Take Back Campaign places recycling responsibility on manufacturers

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 65.169.78.114] on November 12, 2007 12:24 PM
What about third world countries? Do they also need to make a switch? I don't think so; a re-use program that ships these TVs to other countries would be favorable.

What about the mattress industry? Many of these companies sell you a new mattress and get rid of the old one for you. Where do they all go?

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Computer Take Back Campaign places recycling responsibility on manufacturers

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 88.252.30.69] on December 12, 2007 02:12 PM
<a href="http://r10noktanet-seoyarismasi.blogspot.com" title="www.r10.net küresel ısınmaya hayır seo yarışması">www.r10.net küresel ısınmaya hayır seo yarışması</a>

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