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NewsVac: News from around the Web

  • Adobe Breathes AIR into Linux 5 years ago
    Adobe has launched its AIR 1.5 software for Linux. Supported distributions include Fedora 8, Ubuntu 7.10, and openSUSE 10.3. This enables companies and developers to easily target users using all three major OS -- Windows, Linux and Mac -- with a single code base.
  • IBM Lotus Strategist Sees Linux on Netbooks Making Inroads Vs. Windows in 2009 5 years ago
    Linux and open source will start to chip away at Microsoft Windows desktop software thanks to their popularity on netbooks, those ultralight, low-cost laptops. IBM Lotus strategy director predicts this as a major trend in 2009, as well as the proliferation of messaging and collaboration technologies asa function of UCC, SAAS, cloud computing, enterprise social networks and Web services.
  • The Range of Linux Distributions 5 years ago
    A comment from Tezzer to my recent blog post about Two New Linux Beta Distributions got me thinking. Tezzer mentions using Debian, but looking at PCLinuxOS and others for systems that have "issues" with some Linux distributions. I have heard the same comments on other blog posts, and in fact I have seen the same sort of "issues" with my Lifebook S2110 (often because of the ATI display adapter).
  • Indian Express Switches to Red Hat Solutions 5 years ago
    Red Hat , a provider of open source solutions, announced that The Indian Express Group, a media firm in India, has switched to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 from Novell (News - Alert) Netware, to provide a cost-effective scale with accelerated company growth.
  • TI adds ARM9, Linux to sound chip 5 years ago
    Texas Instruments (TI) is shipping a third-generation "Aureus" digital audio processor platform with a Linux software developer's kit (SDK). Available with an evaluation module (EVM) from Spectrum Digital, the DA830 and DA828 system-on-chips (SoCs) combine an ARM9 core with a digital signal processor (DSP).
  • AMD Linux 2008 Year in Review 5 years ago
    Last year when publishing our AMD Year in Review article there were numerous new features to account for, including but not limited to the new OpenGL driver, support for Compiz, and the AMD Catalyst Control Center Linux Edition. This year has been another interesting year for AMD's Linux efforts on both the open and closed fronts. We are focusing on their Catalyst driver efforts in this article, which has picked up support for CrossFire, is now capable of being overclocked with OverDrive, and AMD is now delivering same-day Linux product support. In this article we will recap some of the highlights from the Catalyst driver releases this year as well as set out on a benchmarking extravaganza.
  • Teacher claims Linux 'holding back the kids' 5 years ago
    A US student has landed in hot water with an irate - and apparently ill-informed - teacher for handing out discs of Linux.
  • How is Microsoft with Vista like the Big Three automakers? 5 years ago
    For more than a decade, if you owned a PC, you ran Windows and, far more often than not, Internet Explorer was your Web browser. In fact, for a while, the only three things you could be sure of were death, taxes and Microsoft. Things have changed.
  • The EE Gender Gap Is Widening 5 years ago
    Walk into a classroom of environmental engineering students and, odds are, nearly half of them will be women. Now head next door to an electrical engineering class: you’ll likely find eight men for every woman.
  • Windows needs a Linux package manager 5 years ago
    Windows users have a real problem when it comes to updates. Sure they have Microsoft Update and certainly many applications include their own update mechanisms. Yet despite that, there seems to be a problem with Windows users actually updating.
  • Slackware 12.2 Release Announcement 5 years ago
    Well folks, it's that time to announce a new stable Slackware release again. So, without further ado, announcing Slackware version 12.2! Since we've moved to supporting the 2.6 kernel series exclusively (and fine-tuned the system to get the most out of it), we feel that Slackware 12.2 has many improvements over our last release (Slackware 12.1) and is a must-have upgrade for any Slackware user.
  • "Ubuntu has the strongest chance to take Linux mainstream" 5 years ago
    Jeremy Allison's contributions to the free software world are legion, and yet the project he's best known for continues to be Samba, the open implementation of some of Microsoft's most important networking protocols.
  • Hey Karen, welcome to (hell control W) the community. 5 years ago
    So, after listening to people gripe about this story today, and yesterday, on IRC in email, on various blogs, where Mr Starks was talking about an email he received, I got to thinking. Just to give you context if you don't know what I am on about, click here.
  • Eight Crazy Nights of Hanukkah and Linux 5 years ago
    Trying to find something for your gelibte this year? Look no further, my Linux Geek's Guide to Hanukkah will help you make the right decisions.
  • OpenSolaris now on Toshiba laptops 5 years ago
    Sun has reached an agreement with Toshiba to pre-install the OpenSolaris operating system on Toshiba laptops.
  • More News

Linux.com : Features

A new year, a new Linux.com

By Linux.com Staff on January 01, 2009 (2:00:00 PM)

Many of you have commented that our NewsVac section hasn't been refreshed since the middle of last month. Others have noticed that our story volume has dropped off. Changes are coming to Linux.com, and until they arrive, you won't see any new stories on the site.

Read the Rest - 140 comments

Android-powered G1 phone is an enticing platform for app developers

By Nathan Willis on December 31, 2008 (2:00:00 PM)

The free and open source software community has been waiting for the G1 cell phone since it was first announced in July. Source code for Google's Android mobile platform has been available, but the G1 marks its commercial debut. It's clearly a good device, but is it what Linux boosters and FOSS advocates have long been anticipating?

Read the Rest - 20 comments

Municipalities open their GIS systems to citizens

By Marco Fioretti on December 30, 2008 (2:00:00 PM)

Many public administrations already use open source Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to let citizens look at public geographic data trough dedicated Web sites. Others use the same software to partially open the data gathering process: they let citizens directly add geographic information to the official, high-quality GIS databases by drawing or clicking on digital maps.

Read the Rest - 14 comments

Interclue and the pitfalls of going proprietary

By Bruce Byfield on December 29, 2008 (2:00:00 PM)

The Interclue extension is supposed to give you a preview of links in Firefox before you visit them, saving you mouse-clicks and, with a little luck, allowing you to move quickly between multiple links on the same page. Unfortunately, the determination to monetize the add-on and keep its source code closed results in elaborations that make the basic idea less effective, and its constant pleas for donations make Interclue into nagware. As much as the usefulness of the basic utility, Interclue serves as an object lesson of the difficulties that the decision to go proprietary can take.

Read the Rest - 15 comments

Patterns and string processing in shell scripts

By Peter Seebach on December 26, 2008 (2:00:00 PM)

Shell programming is heavily dependent on string processing. The term string is used generically to refer to any sequence of characters; typical examples of strings might be a line of input or a single argument to a command. Users enter responses to prompts, file names are generated, and commands produce output. Recurring throughout this is the need to determine whether a given string conforms to a given pattern; this process is called pattern matching. The shell has a fair amount of built-in pattern matching functionality.

Read the Rest - 18 comments

Best wishes to you

By Linux.com Staff on December 25, 2008 (2:00:00 PM)

Many religions have some sort of holiday during this season, where we look back at the joyful moments of the year that's coming to a close, and look ahead with anticipation and hope to the year to come. We hope your year is filled with all you wish for.

12 comments

Displaying maps with OpenLayers

By Justin Palk on December 24, 2008 (2:00:00 PM)

Google Maps gives you a quick and easy way to add maps to your Web site, but when you're using Google's API, your ability to display other data is limited. If you have your own data you want to display, or data from sources other than Google, OpenLayers, an open source JavaScript library, can give you more options.

Read the Rest - 5 comments

Revised Slackware keeps it simple

By Susan Linton on December 23, 2008 (7:00:00 PM)

At a time when new and buggy features cloud basic computer functions, it's refreshing to see a new release of a distro like Slackware that stays true to its core philosophy. Slackware has an unfair reputation of being a distro only for experienced users. Granted it doesn't sport many graphical configuration tools, but it balances that with stability and speed.

Read the Rest - 38 comments

FLOSS Manuals sprints to build quality free documentation

By Scott Nesbitt on December 23, 2008 (2:00:00 PM)

Documentation is one area in which free/libre/open source software (FLOSS) is weakest. A project called FLOSS Manuals is trying to remedy this situation. The idea behind project is to create quality, free documentation for free software.

Read the Rest - 16 comments

Nix fixes dependency hell on all Linux distributions

By Pjotr Prins, Jeeva Suresh, and Eelco Dolstra on December 22, 2008 (7:00:00 PM)

A next-generation package manager called Nix provides a simple distribution-independent method for deploying a binary or source package on different flavours of Linux, including Ubuntu, Debian, SUSE, Fedora, and Red Hat. Even better, Nix does not interfere with existing package managers. Unlike existing package managers, Nix allows different versions of software to live side by side, and permits sane rollbacks of software upgrades. Nix is a useful system administration tool for heterogeneous environments and developers who write software supported on different libraries, compilers, or interpreters.

Read the Rest - 76 comments

Three plugins for better online social networking

By Mayank Sharma on December 22, 2008 (2:00:00 PM)

Managing buddies on a few online social networks isn't too much of a hassle, but throw in your contact list from instant messaging platforms and online apps and services like Flickr, Digg, and Twitter, and you have a contact list that'd rival that of Kevin Bacon. Managing so many people can be a headache, but here are three browser plugins that can help you manage your online presence more efficiently.

Read the Rest - 4 comments

The annoyances of proprietary Firefox extensions

By Bruce Byfield on December 19, 2008 (7:00:00 PM)

As a regular browser of the Firefox Add-ons site, I'm troubled by the apparent proliferation of proprietary extensions in the last year. Maybe I've simply exhausted the free-licensed extensions that interest me, but recently every interesting-looking extension seems to be a proprietary one -- especially in the recommended list. Nothing, of course, in the Mozilla privacy or legal notice prohibits proprietary extensions simply because they are proprietary, but I find them not only contrary to the spirit of free and open source software (FOSS), but, often, annoying attempts to entangle me in some impossible startup.

Read the Rest - 37 comments

Open source programming languages for kids

By Ryan McGrath on December 19, 2008 (2:00:00 PM)

The past couple of years have seen an explosion of open source programming languages and utilities that are geared toward children. Many of these efforts are based around the idea that, since the days of BASIC, programming environments have become far too complex for untrained minds to wrap themselves around. Some toolkits aim to create entirely new ways of envisioning and creating projects that appeal to younger minds, such as games and animations, while others aim to recreate the "basic"-ness of BASIC in a modern language and environment.

Read the Rest - 34 comments

openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early

By Susan Linton on December 18, 2008 (7:00:00 PM)

It's that time of the year again. No, not Christmas -- it's the time of the year we get the latest versions of our favorite Linux distributions. Version 11.1 of openSUSE is being released today. Designated as a point release, there are enough new goodies to warrant a new install or upgrade.

Read the Rest - 45 comments

Three ways to create Web-accessible calendars on your intranet

By Ben Martin on December 18, 2008 (2:00:00 PM)

Let's take a look at three projects that are aimed at showing calendar information through a Web interface: WebCalendar, VCalendar, and CaLogic. These projects run on a LAMP server and provide a Web interface to calendar events.

Read the Rest - 5 comments

Barracuda offers a new -- and free -- alternative to Spamhaus

By Robin 'Roblimo' Miller on December 17, 2008 (7:00:00 PM)

For many years Spamhaus has been top dog in the anti-spam world of DNSBL (Domain Name System Block List; also known as Realtime Blackhole Lists or RBLs). But Spamhaus is no longer a 100% free service. Even small nonprofits are now expected to pay at least $250 per year for a subscription to the Spamhaus DNSBL Datafeed Service. Now a new, free alternative to Spamhaus has arrived: the Barracuda Reputation Block List (BRBL), provided by well-known, open source-based Barracuda Networks. And Barracuda CEO Dean Drako says the company has no plans to charge for the service in the future. He says that BRBL (pronounced "barbell") "does cost us a little bit of money to run, but we think that the goodwill, the reputation and the understanding that Barracuda is providing the service will do us well in the long run."

Read the Rest - 26 comments

Where has my disk space gone?

By Federico Kereki on December 17, 2008 (2:00:00 PM)

If Parkinson's Law for computers holds true, then no matter how much disk space you have, it will get used up. If you're already feeling a pinch, consider using a disk space analyzer tool to see what's eating your space.

Read the Rest - 22 comments

Ubuntu-sponsored FOSScamp builds community

By Robin Rowe on December 16, 2008 (9:16:00 PM)

The week-long Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) meets every six months at changing locations to discuss what will be in the next release of Ubuntu. The mostly unpublicized FOSScamp always meets the weekend before. The FOSScamp un-conference has no program, no invited speakers, and costs nothing. Like some sort of geek Woodstock but smaller, the Ubuntu hip just show up.

Read the Rest - 6 comments

Tracking build status with Pulse

By Ben Martin on December 16, 2008 (2:00:00 PM)

Pulse is a build server that can monitor your source repository and trigger a build and test cycle every time somebody does a commit. With Pulse you will always know if the most recent sources in your revision control system compile and if they pass your unit and system tests. Better yet, Pulse allows you to build and test your current working copy of checked-out source, during a so-called Personal Build, so you can see if your code breaks things before you commit your changes to the central repository.

Read the Rest - 3 comments

Condensing with Open Text Summarizer

By Bruce Byfield on December 15, 2008 (7:00:00 PM)

Properly speaking, Nadav Rotem's Open Text Summarizer (OTS) is not a summarizer at all. True summaries generally involve rewording contents at a higher level of generality while preserving the meaning, not just producing a condensed version of the original the way that OTS does. However, within its limits, OTS is an efficient tool for automatically producing abstracts of non-fiction, that, in the last 15 months, has received favorable mention from at least four academic publications, including one in which it outperformed similar utilities, including commercial ones such as Copernic and Subject Search Summarizer.

Read the Rest - 5 comments

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