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Easy video creation using only FOSS software

By Dan MacDonald on November 20, 2006 (8:00:00 AM)

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While digital video editing today is an affordable, popular activity for both the computer hobbyist and amateur cinematographer, many people seem to think that video creation under Linux is either impossible or too difficult for the average computer user. Not so! From video capture to editing to DVD authoring and encoding, you can create high-quality videos easily with free, open source software.
The applications you will require are:
Cinelerra - Non-linear digital video editor and compositor
Kino - FireWire DV video capture
Xawdecode - analog (VHS and camcorder) video capture, DVB capture, streaming and TV/DVR functionality
MEncoder - video conversion
DeVeDe - MEncoder GUI for easy DVD and VCD creation
MPlayer - DVD and video playback
dvd::rip - for ripping DVD video
Firefox with the Flash 9 plugin and VideoDownloader extension - for capturing video off the Web
K3b - for burning DVD or VCD images

One way to get all the tools you need at one time is to download and install the free Debian-based Elive distribution. Video programs are often large, with many dependencies, making them difficult to compile if you can't get pre-built packages for your distro, but you can avoid all the hassle with Elive. It comes with the latest version of Cinelerra, a powerful video editor, and video codecs, proprietary graphics drivers, and video and DVD playback software pre-installed and ready to use. Any packages that you may require for video work that aren't included on the CD can be downloaded easily because Elive's package manager is set up out of the box to include access to Christian Marillat's superb repository of multimedia software for Debian.

The first step in video editing is capturing, ripping or downloading your footage onto hard drive. I have failed to get Cinelerra to capture, but there are other excellent FOSS tools available for that purpose. Kino or dvgrab can capture DV footage over a FireWire link, and XdTV (a.k.a. Xawdecode) does a great job of capturing from analogue video sources if you have a supported Video4Linux device. For good quality analog video capture under XdTV, set it to use the AVI container with FFMpeg Mjpeg codec and change the quality setting to Full. These options reside under the XdTV Record Movie/video parameters menu. You will have to experiment with the brightness, contrast, hue, and colour values under XdTV to get the best quality picture, and if you want to capture off VHS then chances are you will require a SCART to composite or S-Video cable, unless your VCR has such connectors already.

dvd::rip makes capturing from video DVDs a breeze. You have the option of ripping the entire contents of a DVD or individual chapters. dvd::rip outputs to .vob files which can be directly imported into Cinelerra without any conversion, so don't encode to DivX or Xvid after ripping as this will just waste time and reduce the picture quality of the video.

Note that to play or rip DVDs under Linux you must have a package called libdvdcss2 installed. Many distros do not include this package in a default install for legal reasons.

Importing video from Web sites such as YouTube into Cinelerra is a bit trickier, as Cinelerra doesn't support .flv Flash video files. If you want to do this, you must ensure you have both the Flash 9 plugin and the Firefox VideoDownloader extension installed. When you are on a Web page playing the video you want to download, simply click on the two blue squares in the bottom right of your Firefox window and it should then ask you where you want to save the video. Save it with a .flv extension.

VideoLAN has a video conversion wizard under its File menu which you could try using to convert the FLV file into an MPEG or something else that Cinelerra can import, but the version that I tried produced unwanted messy green artifacts in the first few seconds of the output video. I ended up using this script for MEncoder to convert FLV files into Xvid-format AVI files.

Cinelerra isn't difficult to use, but its interface isn't a carbon copy of Premiere or Avid. You can master the fundamentals of Cinelerra in about 15 minutes by following Rob Fisher's excellent tutorial. Although it is possible to run Cinelerra on a standard 1024x768 SVGA display, you would likely find it too restrictive; you would likely spend more time managing windows than editing video. A multi-head display setup is highly recommended for maximum productivity, and the higher resolution of the displays, the better.

When you have finished editing your masterpiece, the chances are that you will want to burn it onto a video DVD. Cinelerra can render your work to a number of different video file formats, but unfortunately MPEG2-PS, which is what video DVDs use, isn't one of them. I normally render to Raw DV format so as to minimize loss of picture quality, which could happen with a more lossy video codec. When rendering is complete you will have a .dv file which you can play back with MPlayer, provided you have the dv codec installed. This codec is normally contained within a package called w32codecs. If you're satisfied with what you see, you can write the video onto a DVD, VCD, SVCD or even CVCD disc by the DeVeDe conversion tool. It will churn out an .iso file that you can write to disc with a burning app such as K3b.

There is a good reason why Linux has become so popular with the big movie studios -- its technical superiority over most proprietary operating systems allows for faster, more reliable data processing. Thanks to the arrival of tools such as DeVeDe and significant developments in key apps such as Cinelerra and XdTV, Linux video production has become easier to use and more mature in the last 12 months. Now the average computer user can take advantage of the power that Linux and FOSS video software brings.

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on Easy video creation using only FOSS software

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Loose, lose.

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 02:21 AM
"From video capture to editing to DVD authoring and encoding, you can create high-quality videos easily with free, open source software"

For some loose definition of easy. Even if one takes the various parts approach to video in Windows? It still is easier and one can do more in those individual programs.

#

Re:Loose, lose.

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 08:04 AM
Maybe so, but the whole point of my guide is to demonstrate what can currently be achieved with FOSS tools. Although some find Cinelerra difficult to use (because they don't have a two monitor setup and/or don't want to learn how to use it normally) the system I've described is much more portable, free and scaleable than any Windows or Mac setup will ever be. xdtv, mencoder, mplayer and cinelerra really are about as powerful as anybody could want- its Linux DVD menu editors (menus=gimmickry imo) if thats what you really want that are really lagging behind apps on 'doze or osx. I couldn't care less so I'm happy with Linux video as it is but I can't wait to see how it will progress- expect it to pick up radidly now the PS3 has been released!

#

Re:Loose, lose. (How will PS3 help Linux Video)

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 10:01 PM
How will PS3 help Linux Video.

Please explain? Does the PS3 have the ability to hook up a USB external Hard drive so that you can store more than the PS3 hard drives allow? With Video Editing it takes FAST hard drives with lots of extra room to work...!

What is your reasoning for the PS3 statement?

#

Re:Loose, lose. (How will PS3 help Linux Video)

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 22, 2006 12:54 AM
The PS3 has a number of High-Speed (480MBps) USB2 ports, gigabit ethernet and SATA for accessing lots of fast hard drives. You can easily upgrade the internal PS3 SATA HD with something bigger and faster too. You could also use any USB2 firewire adapter supported by Linux or an analogue video capture card that works with Video4Linux for capturing video.

Before you dismiss the idea of PS3 video editing, when I started editing DV video it was on a dual-processor P2 with a combined clock rating of 800Mhz but it only had 128MB RAM compared to the PS3s 256MB RAM and 3.2Ghz (x8!) processor. Sure, modern day PC's and Macs have gigs of RAM but I'm just highlighting the fact that DV video editing on the PS3 will be possible.

No PS3-optimised Linux distros have been released at the time of writing and so PS3 Linux users currently lack accelerated video and 3D. Yellow Dog Linux 5.0 will be the first proper PS3 distro and that comes out next week I think!

When mencoder gets optimised for the cell processor, thats when Linux video will REALLY gain some serious interest!

#

Video editing is currently a Linux fault

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 03:45 AM
I am a fan of FS/OSS and Linux. My home has been MS Windows free for 3 years now. I have produced many DVDs on Linux, including several distributed to more than 100 people each. I know of which I speak when I say:

Video editing on Linux is not easy!

- The default DVD export settings on Kino will produce a video encoded such that no DVD I could find could play it. I had to learn about MPEG video encoding and anchor frames and Avidemux tricks to figure out what settings would make it work.
- Different distros connect the DV camera at different device locations. Fedora does<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/dev/raw1394/raw1394. OpenSUSE does something else (like<nobr> <wbr></nobr>/dev/dv1394-0, memory fails me at the moment). Neither of which is the default Kino and other tools expect.
- Special effects like fading between scenes, animated transitions, etc. are difficult or impossible to do.
- DVD authoring tools (pick one: qDVDAuthor, DVDStyler, etc.) all have quirks and rough edges including unexplained crashes, goofy defaults and bad user interfaces.

The only reasons I was successful with it is my insistence to use FS/OSS and my background as a tech savvy Linux user. No "average" user would get past just hooking up their video camera.

I recommend Linux usage to all my family and friends, UNLESS I know that they do video editing. I'd be spending all my time supporting them and leaving them with a bad taste in their mouth if they were to try it.

I wish someone among the big distros out there (Red Hat, Ubuntu, SUSE) would attack this issue because it is a major impediment to Linux use by consumers. Someone throw some resourses and actual design work at the video problem, please!

P.S. This article does nothing to make it easier. It is very shallow and broad. It just speaks of the generalities of using various applications without offering any real information on any of them. I was disappointed by it.

#

Re:Video editing is currently a Linux fault

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 07:46 AM
I've never experienced any real difficulty capturing from a DV camera under Linux like yourself, its normally just a case of making sure you have the firewire modules (ieee1394, ohci1394, raw1394, dv1394) running using modprobe as root and you're off!

I agree about Linux DVD menu editors though- they need a fair bit of work and are far behind the good DVD authoring apps for Windows and OSX. Personally though I detest DVD menus, FBI copyright warnings and trailers etc- I just want to watch the video thanks!

As for the article being 'shallow'- just imagine how big it would've been trying to fully explain every step involved in all those different apps- it would've been a whole books worth! This article assumes the reader already has a basic knowledge of using Linux and previous experience using video software- I've only covered things I thought not entirely obvious like what the best FOSS app is for whatever task and the points which I had to research or puzzle over myself along the way. You'll find that everything I haven't mentioned in the article and my xdtv note in these comments is easy to figure out on your own if you have a higher IQ than a sprout.

Yes, certain Windows and Mac video software is more mature and/or easier- I never said otherwise- but the fact that all this software is entirely free (in both respects, except flash currently) and portable is priceless.

#

Re:Video editing is currently a Linux fault

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 09:27 PM
"Yes, certain Windows and Mac video software is more mature and/or easier- I never said otherwise- but the fact that all this software is entirely free (in both respects, except flash currently) and portable is priceless."

Apparently the time wasted in using the "solutions" is "priceless" too. Oh, and there are standards on both the Windows and Mac platform so one's data can go across all three platforms even if the programs themselves aren't free.

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Re:Video editing is currently a Linux fault

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 22, 2006 09:55 PM
Funny, I didn't read anywhere in the article a statement to the effect of "oh, and editing on linux is easier and much better than mac and apple; take that fanboys."

But hey, if this is the place to draw comparisons about the article and unrelated OS then by all means.

#

Run VirtualDub using WINE

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 08:06 PM
You can run the Windows video editor VirtualDub using WINE, but I've never actually used it, just got it running, to see if it would.

#

Avidemux

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 22, 2006 12:38 AM
Avidemux is almost identical to Virtual Dub but instead runs natively on Linux so you might want to try that instead. Neither program is anywhere near as powerful as Cinelerra.

<a href="http://fixounet.free.fr/avidemux/" title="fixounet.free.fr">http://fixounet.free.fr/avidemux/</a fixounet.free.fr>

#

Re:Video editing is currently a Linux fault

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 22, 2006 01:14 AM
Given that the "$100 Laptop" now includes a video camera (probably one reason it costs more than $100 now...), one would think they'll be working on a simple editor for it.

#

Note on video capture with xdtv

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 07:27 AM
If your computer is reasonably modern, you should be able to capture full DVD resolution video with sound in realtime under xdtv. You use a different resolution and frame rate for capture depending upon if you are making a PAL (Europe, Austraila) or NTSC (Asia and US) disc. PAL DVD spec is 720x576 @ 25 frames per second NTSC DVD spec is 720x480 @ 29.97 fps Note that if you want to change the video width to 720 you may have to change the 'W-Modul' value to 16 first, which is located next to the video width setting under the xdtv Record Movie/video parameters menu.

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You gotta wonder

Posted by: ThoreauHD on November 21, 2006 10:05 AM
You can make state of the art movies on linux but you can't make a DVD of grandpa fishin. Sounds like money is gonna crack this one. Pinnacle would make a nice killing in this market. MS certainly won't do a port of any multimedia anything to linux.

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Re:You gotta wonder

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 10:56 AM
One thing to note is when e.g. Weta FX use linux they might use linux for a render farm, rather than a video editing or capture solution. Just one piece in the puzzle, which the rest is built around.

I purchased a Mac because linux was so bad with video.

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Re:You gotta wonder

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 04:49 PM
"but you can't make a DVD of grandpa fishing" ??

Eh? This is what the article is about (making video DVDs) is it not?

#

Startcom Linux does above (only Clusters too)!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 10:11 PM
If you go to StartCom Linux's site you will find a distro that is taylored for Multi-media.

Press release here:
<a href="http://www.startcom.org/?app=14&rel=18" title="startcom.org">http://www.startcom.org/?app=14&rel=18</a startcom.org>

And it does Clustering for more power (built=in).

Does anyone have any experience with this distro?

I like Gwneview for Photo management and they were using something else so I dropped the idea of installing it... but, it looks really interesting!

I was hoping that StartCom would combine and integrate LTSP features (OR would migrate to Ubuntu vs RPMs and use those repositories as their own repositories are rather limited)! Ubuntu, the Multi-media selections, CLUSTERING out of the box, and LTSP would be a killer for Schools and Education environments that do a digital photo lab these days!

#

Easy!?!???

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 02:55 AM
Take a look at iMovie or Windows Movie Maker then tell me about easy.

Crack is whack!

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Re:Easy!?!???

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 22, 2006 08:44 AM
For stupid people I'll show easy way:
---
One way to get all the tools you need at one time is to download and install the free Debian-based Elive distribution.
---

Everything else depends on your distribution and it's target audience.For server distros you'll have a lots of headache.Things like Ubuntu, SuSe or Mandriva can be easy enough.

P.S. but<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.. er... how to create DVDs with Windows Movie Maker?I did not got the clue.It can output lame VMW files I do not need to have or at very best, AVIs.Let's admit this is not DVD as well...

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Re:Easy!?!???

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on April 29, 2007 04:39 PM
Windows Movie Maker - hahahahahahah hahahahaha hahahahahahaha<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.....

Sorry, I couldn't help myself.

#

Re:Easy!?!???

Posted by: Administrator on November 21, 2006 03:53 AM
Are those progs FOSS? Nope!

#

only free, open source software? sure about that

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 03:16 AM
that flash plugin is not<nobr> <wbr></nobr>:-]

#

Re:only free, open source software? sure about tha

Posted by: Administrator on November 21, 2006 03:51 AM
True, the Flash plugin isn't FOSS. gnash is getting there but isn't able to handle video yet from what I hear.

I only bothered including the downloading from web sites and ripping off DVD instructions for completeness sake- most people aren't going to be interested in doing either of those really so the important software is FOSS (xdtv, kino, Cinelerra and DeVeDe)

#

Video editing is currently a Linux fault

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 07:18 AM
Rather than repeat myself, I commented on this article over on NewsForge. I saw it linked from there first.

<a href="http://software.newsforge.com/comments.pl?sid=60269&cid=131585" title="newsforge.com">http://software.newsforge.com/comments.pl?sid=602<nobr>6<wbr></nobr> 9&cid=131585</a newsforge.com>

#

Linux for DVD creation

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 12:59 PM
I use Linux for audio creation and video editing. Its professional tools are great - best in the industry.

However, I have yet to find anything that allows the simple creation of a consumer readable DVD. Presently after I have created the master files I send it out to a contractor who puts the DVD format "wrapper" around it and stamps out the DVDs.

This is really not a problem for the media creation professionals as our workstations, be they Linux, BSD, or Mac's, can import and export a wide variety of file formats. It is a pain, however, to create a one-off that one can give to ones friends with just at consumer DVD player.

#

Re:Linux for DVD creation

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 04:52 PM
This is exactly what DeVeDe does and it is easier (or as easy) to use as any similar app for Windows or Mac but is 100% free! Its fast too.

#

Re:Linux for DVD creation

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 05:13 PM
Also check out DVD Styler at <a href="http://www.dvdstyler.de/" title="dvdstyler.de">http://www.dvdstyler.de/</a dvdstyler.de> which allows for menu creation and stuff like that.

mrben
<a href="http://www.jedimoose.org/" title="jedimoose.org">http://www.jedimoose.org/</a jedimoose.org>

#

Re:Linux for DVD creation

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 22, 2006 10:41 AM
Thanks for those links. Those packages look like exactly what I've been needing. Available as<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.deb no less! Perfect!

#

Never managed to create an dvd

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 09:39 PM
I still haven't managed to create an dvd movie
with Linux.

Closest I've ever got was an dvd with menus, but
the sound was "coughing". It didn't seem to be
anything obvious like too high bit rate.

This was trying to make a PAL dvd, with dv-video
as source. Edited with kino. Kino is my all time
favorite editing software, with an fast and clean
interface.

If I remember correctly qdvdauthor was used to
create the menus etc.

The weird thing is, i have edited and encoded
videos with kino (mp2enc mp2 mplex) before and
authored the dvds with dvdfactory under windows
and it worked. I don't think it re-encoded the
video. Using dvdfactory is no longer an option so
I cannot test this now.

Any ideas or similar problems? I'd really like to
have an easy process to quickly (or at all) create
an dvd of my camera footage.

#

Startcom Linux has (w/Clustering out-of-the-box)

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 21, 2006 10:18 PM
If you go to StartCom Linux's site you will find a distro that is taylored for Multi-media.

Press release here:
<a href="http://www.startcom.org/?app=14&rel=18" title="startcom.org">http://www.startcom.org/?app=14&rel=18</a startcom.org>

And it does Clustering for more power (built=in).

Does anyone have any experience with this distro?

I like Gwneview for Photo management and they were using something else so I dropped the idea of installing it... but, it looks really interesting!

I was hoping that StartCom would combine and integrate LTSP features (OR would migrate to Ubuntu vs RPMs and use those repositories as their own repositories are rather limited)! Ubuntu, the Multi-media selections, CLUSTERING out of the box, and LTSP would be a killer for Schools and Education environments that do a digital photo lab these days!

You only have to be aware that DVD play is turned on by default... meaning those poor folks in the USA can't use this distro (or they have to know how to disable the DVD player).

Also - you gotta wonder if Yellow DOG is doing something with this for the PS3...
<a href="http://www.terrasoftsolutions.com/products/ydl/" title="terrasoftsolutions.com">http://www.terrasoftsolutions.com/products/ydl/</a terrasoftsolutions.com>
only the hard drive space in the PS3 is too small, hmmm, can you us a larger USB hard drive on the PS3?

#

consumer DVD creation is easy

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 22, 2006 09:42 AM
I use Qdvdauthor for creating my dvd's. It has much more options than devede, like creating nice menu's. It generates a script for making the dvd. The result is always good. The drawback is that it is not very stable: save your project frequent.

#

Re:Startcom Linux has (w/Clustering out-of-the-box

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 22, 2006 04:23 PM
Sounds interesting but I failed to find a full package list for its multimedia version. I looked on distrowatch though and I do know that it comes with cinelerra 2.0 instead of 2.1 like under elive. I would also want easy access (or pre-installed) to all the other apps I mentioned like xdtv, DeVeDe, mencoder etc. if I was to be using it for video.

#

Re:Startcom Linux has (w/Clustering out-of-the-box

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 23, 2006 12:27 AM
You can add Fedora (5) Extra mirrors to yum and install/update via Yum Extender a whole bunch more of apps you like. With over 4 GB of software delivered on the install DVD however, it should provide most of what you'd use.

#

Re:Easy!?!???

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 22, 2006 07:02 AM
Freeness does not provide inherent superiority! Just because software is available under a FLOSS license does not make it better or EASIER!

Here's an example. Take this giant pile of shit. Go ahead, take it! It's hot and it's steamy and it's stinky but, that's OK because I'm offering it to you free of charge and with the liberty to do with it whatever you wish, with the exception (Paragraph 2 Subsection 3) of throwing it at me.

So, now you have this giant pile of shit. It cost you nothing and it is completely libre(within reason). But, you still have a GIANT STEAMING PILE OF SHIT!!! That doesn't change because of the license.

FOSS doesn't make it easier. The fact of the matter is that most FOSS is quite a bit harder to use than the commercial equivalent. Case in point...

#

Re:Easy!?!???

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 22, 2006 04:18 PM
I never said this was EASIER than anything, I just said it is easy. However, I will say my guide is easier than other Linux/FOSS video guides I have seen on the web, which is the reason I wrote it. See my other reply in this same thread for the many plus points of FOSS software.

#

Re:Easy!?!???

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 22, 2006 01:17 PM
"Are those progs FOSS? Nope!"

What does that mean to an end user? It might matter to developers who want to much around with source but not to a user.

#

Re:Easy!?!???

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 22, 2006 04:09 PM
It means:

They save lots of money on the price of software. Some people don't have an option of spending hundreds or thousands of dollars on software so in that case they either risk their security and data by using pirate software or they can legally and safely use FOSS.

They can help with the testing of new releases, report bugs, and make feature suggestions even if they cannot program. In the world of FOSS, if you come up with a good idea the programmers didn't think of and you let them know it is often implemented shortly after- I've had this happen personally many, many times. This NEVER happens with commercial software unless maybe you're the head of the IT dept of one of the biggest customers of whatever software vendor, maybe.

Somebody mentioned portability of data, which of course is very important and possible with both proprietary and FOSS software, but with FOSS the apps are portable over different computer architectures too. Look- the PS3 has just been released with a CPU which is orders of magnitude faster than anything else available. Wouldn't it be great to take advantage of that? Can you run Premiere or Avid on the PS3? No, because it isn't FOSS- you've just got to hope that Adobe or whoever really owns the software decides to port their secret code. Can you run Cinelerra or Kino- yes you can!

When you're running non-FOSS software, if the company who produced the app goes under without releasing the code and then you find bugs in the mean time, you're stuck with a buggy app that you can do nothing about except look elsewhere. If people use it then orphaned FOSS apps get adopted and improved by someone else.

#

Some more Multimedia Distros

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 23, 2006 03:04 AM
Here are some more multimedia distros that focus on video creation.

VideoLinux

<a href="http://videolinux.net/" title="videolinux.net">http://videolinux.net/</a videolinux.net>

Based on PCLinuxOS.

Quote from the site:

…what about a Linux Distro with all the native Linux multimedai apps plus Wine pre installed and configured ready to be able to install Windows Apps. So the VideoLinux idea was born.

Included apps

Kino - non-linear DV editor
AcidRip - a Gtk::Perl application for ripping and encoding DVD’s.
Avidemux - a small editing software for avi.
KLVEmkdvd - DVD authoring GUI
Kmenc15 - Advanced KDE MEncoder frontend.
Kdenlive! - a Non-Linear Video Editing Suite for KDE.
Video-DVD::Rip - DVD ripping GUI.
You can watch a demo of VideoLinux here: <a href="http://osvids.com/vids/0001/vid_0001.html" title="osvids.com">http://osvids.com/vids/0001/vid_0001.html</a osvids.com>

LazyDragon

<a href="http://lazydragon.org/" title="lazydragon.org">http://lazydragon.org/</a lazydragon.org>

Based on Slackware.

Quote from the site:

LazyDragon Gnu/Linux is a Linux distro aimed at video and audio production.Unfortunately there aren’t many distributions aimed specifically at Audio/Video editing and production<nobr> <wbr></nobr>,So thats where LazyDragon comes in

Some of the included apps:

Blender - 3D modeling, animation & rendering.
KVideoEncoder -
Avidemux - a small editing software for avi.
CamStream -
Cinelerra - Non Linear Editing & Compositing.
DVDAuthor -
(X)DVDShrink -
DVDWizard -
FFMpeg -
GMEncoder -
Codeine - Video Player
Kaffeine - Video Player
VLC - Video Player
Xine-UI - Video Player
Check out the full list Here

Studio to Go!

<a href="http://www.ferventsoftware.com/" title="ferventsoftware.com">http://www.ferventsoftware.com/</a ferventsoftware.com>

Based on Debian.

Studio to Go! Live CD is free, however Fervent Software charge a fee for “enhanced features”.

Quote from the site:

Studio to Go! is a CD of integrated music software that runs direct from your CD drive.

Some of the included apps:

Rosegarden - audio and MIDI sequencer and score editor.
LilyPond - Score typesetting for creating notation output.
SooperLooper
ALSA Sound Drivers
JACK Audio
Rezound
QAMix, HDSPMixer, envy24control - Mixers
QJackCtl
Vkeybd
Ardour
Audacity (Fervent build with JACK support)
Check out the full list here.

dyne:bolic

<a href="http://dynebolic.org/" title="dynebolic.org">http://dynebolic.org/</a dynebolic.org>

Not based on existing distro.

Quote from the site:

dyne:bolic is shaped on the needs of media activists, artists and creatives as a practical tool for multimedia production: you can manipulate and broadcast both sound and video with tools to record, edit, encode and stream, having automatically recognized most device and peripherals: audio, video, TV, network cards, firewire, usb and more; all using only free software!

Included apps:

3D Modeling
Blender

Audio
Ardour (audio processor)
Audacity
MuSE
ReZound

Image Editing
Gimp

Video Producing
Cinelerra
LiVES
FreeJ
Kino
MEncoder
XawTV
Transcode - for converting video format

Video Playing
MPlayer
FFmpeg

Video Streaming
Mp4Live — streaming MPEG4
Palantir — streaming MJPEG
HasciiCam — converting webcam images to ASCII images

#

Easy video creation...

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 23, 2006 03:10 AM
As for your comment "There is a good reason why Linux has become so popular with the big movie studios -- its technical superiority over most proprietary operating systems allows for faster, more reliable data processing."

After doing some research, I have found that the studios had a major investment in UNIX based tools and footage. The adoption of studio grade Linux tools was made mostly for financial reasons, as is most always the case.

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Re:Easy video creation...

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 23, 2006 04:32 PM
Finance does play a factor, but performance is king and Linux normally wins in both areas for high performance computing tasks such as video rendering. You'll notice that the majority of the Top 500 supercomputers run Linux.

<a href="http://www.top500.org/stats/28/os/" title="top500.org">http://www.top500.org/stats/28/os/</a top500.org>

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Re:Easy video creation...

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 23, 2006 04:37 PM
I think this link demonstrates that better:

<a href="http://www.top500.org/stats/28/osfam/" title="top500.org">http://www.top500.org/stats/28/osfam/</a top500.org>

75% of supercomputers run Linux

0.6% run MacOS

Windows doesn't even get a look in

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fedora 6 and video creation

Posted by: Administrator on November 24, 2006 01:47 AM
I recently installed fedora core 6 and proceeded to add the applications for video production.
Capture with ieee1394 from a sony videocam or advc100, the main hangup is selinux which I have disabled while doing capture as it blocks raw1394. I should figure it out soon so selinux can go back to enforcing.

Software
fedora extras: audacity
zod - freshrpms: dvdrip, kino, mpg321, mplayer, vcdimager

Capture, editing, format conversion - kino
convert to bin, cue with vcdimager - svcd format
cdrdao to burn the svcd
mplayer vcd://2 to play the svcd

for the dvd types -- dvdauthor and cdrecord

I really like svcd for 1 hour tv programs, captured directly to disk with the canopus advc100 or from vhs.

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Note on analogue video capture with xdtv

Posted by: Administrator on November 21, 2006 04:01 AM
If your computer is reasonably modern, you should be able to capture full DVD resolution video with sound in realtime under xdtv. You use a different resolution and frame rate for capture depending upon if you are making a PAL (Europe, Austraila) or NTSC (Asia and US) disc.

PAL DVD spec is 720x576 @ 25 frames per second

NTSC DVD spec is 720x480 @ 29.97 fps

Note that if you want to change the video width to 720 you may have to change the 'W-Modul' value to 16 first, which is located next to the video width setting under the xdtv Record Movie/video parameters menu.

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A video of Elive itself made with his tools

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 83.32.101.164] on February 19, 2008 08:18 AM

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