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Personal finance software for GNU/Linux

By Jem Matzan on November 08, 2005 (8:00:00 AM)

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Intuit Quicken and Microsoft Money are two popular Windows-based packages for personal financial management. GNU/Linux offers several similar applications -- most of them free software -- that can meet or exceed the capabilities of the proprietary programs. If you can adjust to a different interface, you might find you like one of them more than the better-known alternatives.

Moneydance

Reilly Technologies' Moneydance is the only proprietary program of the bunch. The license is restrictive in all the usual ways -- you can use Moneydance on only one computer, you can't use it for commercial purposes, and you can't modify it or give it out to anyone.

Moneydance is written in Java and therefore requires a Java Runtime Environment. I tested it on the 64-bit Sun JRE version 1.5.0 for Linux (a configuration that can be difficult for poorly written Java programs) and had no trouble installing or running it.

Despite being proprietary, Moneydance seems to be superior to the other financial tools I tested. It can import Quicken .QIF files, retrieve updated account information directly from bank Web sites that support the OFX protocol (there is a long list of participating banks, and if yours is not listed you can add yours via manual settings, or download data from your bank's Web site and import it manually into Moneydance), and it has an extensibility architecture that allows you to add extra program components. The default extension list includes tools for importing text files, predicting future balances, an online updater for Moneydance, Yahoo! stock quotes and currency exchange rates, a Python scripting interface, and a credit card payoff calculator. I didn't discover any other official extensions outside of the default list.

Moneydance thumbnail
Click to enlarge
Moneydance saves its files in an XML-based format, which should be about as portable as a file format can be. You can generate graphs and a wide variety of financial reports, and export them to .QIF or tab-delimited text files if you like. If you want to use Moneydance data with tax preparation software, you can export to the TurboTax .TXF format via a beta extension that you can, upon request, get from the Moneydance programmers. Presumably this will be added to the default extension list when it is deemed production-ready.

The interface looks nice and is easy to navigate. I didn't have to read any manuals or help files to figure out how to use any portion of the program. My only real gripe about Moneydance is its lousy integration with GNU/Linux desktops; when you install it it fails to generate any GNOME or KDE menu entries, so you'll have to start it from the command line or navigate to the program binary through your graphical file manager.



jGnash

JGnash thumbnail
Click to enlarge
GPL-licensed jGnash is also written in Java, but doesn't have a cool installer program like Moneydance has. To run the program, you have to use the java -jar command from a terminal, which is about as user-unfriendly as a program binary can be. Don't expect any integration with GNOME or KDE, either -- if you want jGnash in your menus, you will have to add it yourself. I had no difficulty running the program on a 32-bit version 1.5.0 JRE, but on a different machine with a 64-bit version 1.5.0 JRE, jGnash froze when I tried to quit, forcing me to kill its process from the command line. jGnash is designed to work with a JRE version 1.4.0 and newer.

Like all the programs I used for this article, jGnash can import from Quicken .QIF files. As an added bonus, it can also import GnuCash data. Like Moneydance, the default file format jGnash saves in is XML-based, although it's not the same file format Moneydance uses. Export formats are inconsistent: you can export some reports to PDF, HTML, and comma-delimited text files (.CSV), but others offer only .CSV export. There is no .TXF export support in jGnash.

The jGnash interface is minimalist, but still a cut above GnuCash's barren interface. Instead of a lot of fancy buttons, most of the functions in jGnash are executed through the menu system. jGnash has six possible GUI "look and feel" sets, and about two dozen graphical themes, but I found the defaults to be the most attractive. One big negative point about jGnash is its speed: it's extremely slow in its calculations, even with only a few simple entries of test data to work with. On a dual Opteron workstation with 4GB of RAM, it took about 15 seconds just to bring up a profit and loss calculation window after I selected it from the menu. I'd hate to see how long it takes with a year's worth of bank and credit card transaction data in it.

KMyMoney

KMyMoney thumbnail
Click to enlarge
KMyMoney is a free software program optionally included with KDE in some GNU/Linux distributions. It's much like Intuit Quicken in terms of its interface; even the forest green opening splash screen is reminiscent of Quicken.

Most of the same functionality is present in KMyMoney as in Quicken, except there is no ability to communicate directly with financial institutions, and it lacks .TXF export functionality. As far as file importing is concerned, Quicken .QIF and GnuCash data can be imported into the KMyMoney format. There is no ability to export to anything other than .QIF, however, so don't expect to come out with a PDF, PostScript, or plain text file.







GnuCash

GNU Cash thumbnail
Click to enlarge
GnuCash is a free software program often included with GNOME-based GNU/Linux distributions. It's not as intuitive as the other programs profiled in this article, and it takes some time to get used to its way of doing things. I tested version 1.8.11, which was most current at the time. Since then, 1.8.12 has been released, reportedly with the ability to import online banking data in the OXF format.

Like all of the other programs I tested, GnuCash can import Quicken .QIF files. It's a little light on features, though, compared to Moneydance, and nowhere near the expanded functionality of Quicken 2005 Premiere. GnuCash can also export to .TXF files for transport to tax preparation programs.

CrossOver Office

And then, of course, there is CrossOver Office, the WINE-based Windows API emulator and graphical program installation framework. According to the CrossOver Office compatibility list, four Quicken versions are supported: 2002, 2003, 2004, and to a lesser extent, Quicken 2005 Premiere. I tested Quicken 2003 Premiere on CrossOver Office 4.2, and found it to work rather well. The only glitch I found was the disappearance of the button graphics. For those die-hards who just can't leave Quicken behind, CrossOver Office may be the perfect solution.

Conclusions

GNU/Linux supports several excellent financial planning and tracking tools. All of them will work for basic home finances, but if you're a heavy-duty Quicken user, your only choice may be to keep the program and run it through CrossOver Office. For those who don't use any of the business-related features of Quicken, Moneydance represents a good alternative. All of the other programs have only part of the functionality of Quicken. Since they are all free software and can readily be downloaded and experienced, there's no harm in trying each of them out.

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on Personal finance software for GNU/Linux

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Meet or exceed?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 08, 2005 05:44 PM
I'm what some might call an open source zealot. I loudly proclaim the wonders of open source and Linux wherever I go and I actively seek to convert Windows users over to the light. I've used most of the financial packages available on Linux and I can tell you that they do *not* meet or exceed the capabilities of either Quicken or Money.

GnuCash is about the closest thing to meeting MS Money and Quicken head on and it even feels like a bit of a hack job at times.

Linux does have weaknesses in the software field. Personal and Business Finance software is one of those weaknesses. As painful as that is to admit, once we do we can go about REALLY meeting and exceeding the competition.

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Re:Meet or exceed?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 08, 2005 07:44 PM
Well , as you have used most of the financial packages, then you probably have used both gnucash 1.8 and kmymoney 0.8. (only that, those more close to a desktop).
Can you then be more specific about at what points each of those programs on the mentioned versions don't meet the capabilities of Quicken or Money?

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Re:Meet or exceed?

Posted by: helios17 on November 09, 2005 12:00 AM
This gets a bit tiresome. I honestly wish people would do a bit more research before they make blanket statements such as this article is based upon.

What is the problem? People are stuck with quicken/quickbooks data files not working or importing to Linux programs. Wrong. We have had for the past year TWO that do the job nicely. One is open source, one is proprietary.

Kmymoney2 is a drop-in replacement for quicken. While still under development, I have set this proggie up with over a dozen of my clients and they are perfectly happy with it.

Appgen's MyBooks Pro is A closed source, proprietary multi-platform financial package that beats the pants off of Quickbooks. You can access your books from any internet-connected computer in the world and it is scalable to the nth degree. Yeah, it costs about 60 bucks, and I'll tell you why you should pay for it.

You are not going to find a Linux Developer to stay on top of the ever-changing laws, tax codes and stock data for free. I challenge you to find someone who will. If there was someone like that, TurboTax would have a Linux opensource equivilant. The fact is, everything is not free and while I use 99% open source free as in beer software, as A business owner, I chose to use MyBooks Pro.

The Linux community has many choices over windows programs such as quicken/quickbooks. You just have to be aware of what is going on in the community. Google is a good friend of mine.

helios

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Re:Meet or exceed?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 09, 2005 07:07 AM
This gets a bit tiresome.I honestly wish people would do a bit more research before they make blanket statements such as this article is based upon.

So true, couldn't agree more. But at this day and age I don't think it's reasonable any longer to expect "journalists" to do research and fact checking.

We have had for the past year TWO that do the job nicely.

Actually it's even better, you forgot one I think. A proprietary one who have been around for several years already, Kapital from the Kompany.

You just have to be aware of what is going on in the community.

And it's so much going on it's hard to keep track of everything, even with friend Google<nobr> <wbr></nobr>:-)

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Re:Meet or exceed?

Posted by: Joseph Cooper on November 09, 2005 02:12 AM
Well, I'd say that's cause there aren't a lot of accountants who also happen to be programmers with a ton of free time.

Companies with money to spend on development can hire accountants and fund usability studies, but an organization with no revenue and volunteer developers just isn't gonna be able to do that very easily.

Personally, I'm usin gnuCash for my business stuff, but I really can't say how it is in comparison to anything, cause I just started using it last week and it's the only accounting program I've ever used in my life.

That said, I should not that a lot of Linux Kernel, FireFox, OpenOffice.org, etc. etc. programs are developed a lot by programmers on a corporate payroll who have funding for development needs and are working full time. (Redhat, Netscape\Mozilla, Sun, IBM, etc.)

That's not any less free software or anything, it's basically just companies and other organizations (The US Government and others do some work on this stuff) joining the developer community.

It's still a fill-a-need type thing, though. Netscape makes web browsers. So we have FireFox. Sun makes StarOffice... So we have OpenOffice. RedHat works on the kernel cause it's what they sell. Companies and organizations that use the stuff, like NASA, also make contributions whenever prudent.

Point is: Find a company or a professional accountant with a need to make an open accounting program, and then you'll have a good one.

Until then, it's kinda silly to expect programmers with little connection to such a profession to just jump up and compete with Quicken for the hell of it...

If you really know what an accounting program NEEDS, and WHY gnucash is so much worse, specifically, join their dev community and work with them. Do it as a non-programmer if you aren't one.

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jgnash

Posted by: Hillbilly on November 08, 2005 07:54 PM
i don't need or want a lot of features in finance, i only need something that will emulate a checkbook register, since i already have OpenOffice i would use a spreadsheet but i want the application to automatically calculate withdrawals and deposits so for the time being gjnash does this good enough (j2re required) <a href="http://jgnash.sourceforge.net/" title="sourceforge.net">http://jgnash.sourceforge.net/</a sourceforge.net>

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Moneydance ROCKS!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 08, 2005 09:35 PM
Moneydance, moneydance, moneydance.

It's like Quicken back when it was good before they made it all tied into internet explorer. And it run on Linux, MacOS, Windows etc.

<a href="http://www.moneydance.com/" title="moneydance.com">http://www.moneydance.com/</a moneydance.com>

ITS very good.

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Re:Moneydance ROCKS!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 09, 2005 02:17 AM
I bought it a couple months ago, and totally agree with your comment.

Moneydance really is one of the best programs I've ever used, on any platform.

It isn't perfect (the Moneydance mailing list discusses shortfalls regularly), but it is fast and easy to use. Plus the developer personally answers questions, quickly and accurately.

It's not FOSS, but it is really, really good.

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Re:Moneydance ROCKS!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 09, 2005 10:12 AM
I have been using Moneydance for about 7 months and I am very happy with the program. It does what I need very well and has been very stable on my RHEL4 system. Interface is not fancy but it doesn't add a lot of garbage to the UI. Simple and to the point.
Recommended!

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Bill paying, yet?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 09, 2005 03:32 AM
One feature of Quicken that I use extensively is the ability not just to download transactions, but to upload them as well. That is, enter and schedule payments in Quicken and it uploads them to my bank.

The last time I investigated kMyMoney and GNUCash, they looked pretty good at the tracking side of things, but I couldn't get them to upload instructions for payments. Maybe it is in there and I just couldn't figure out how to do it.

And, there is my question....can any of these packages do that now? If they can, great. If not, then I stick with Quicken.

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SQL Ledger and GNU Cash how-to guides

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 09, 2005 04:38 AM
Here is a GNU Cash guide:
<a href="http://www.aerospacesoftware.com/GNU_Cash_for_Business_users_Howto_Guide.html" title="aerospacesoftware.com">http://www.aerospacesoftware.com/GNU_Cash_for_Bus<nobr>i<wbr></nobr> ness_users_Howto_Guide.html</a aerospacesoftware.com>

and here is a SQL Ledger guide:
<a href="http://www.aerospacesoftware.com/sql-ledger.html" title="aerospacesoftware.com">http://www.aerospacesoftware.com/sql-ledger.html</a aerospacesoftware.com>

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GRISBI too!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 08, 2005 06:37 PM
<a href="http://beranger.zoom.ro/index.php?article=304" title="beranger.zoom.ro">http://beranger.zoom.ro/index.php?article=304</a beranger.zoom.ro>

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Parcus Group - Personal Finance Software

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on February 22, 2007 11:44 AM
I personally look after my family budget and all spending items need to be accounted for so that at any point in time you know where you are. Requires discipline but that's the only way.
To help you with budgeting I'd recommend a personal finance software by Australian business Parcus Group.
Easy to use program with features including budgeting, financial planning, real estate analysis, shares valuation, life insurance...
Costs US$24 so it's not a huge investment but absolutely great value for money.
You can get it on <a href="http://www.parcusgroup.com/index.html" title="parcusgroup.com">http://www.parcusgroup.com/index.html</a parcusgroup.com>
or
<a href="http://www.parcusgroup.com/index.html" title="parcusgroup.com">http://www.parcusgroup.com/index.html</a parcusgroup.com>
Regards

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PLCash, too

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 08, 2005 08:24 PM
Grisbi, yes... but also PLCash:

<a href="http://www.arachnoid.com/PLCash/" title="arachnoid.com">http://www.arachnoid.com/PLCash/</a arachnoid.com>

Like jGnash and Moneydance, both Grisbi and PLCash are cross-platform (unlike GNUCash and KMyMoney). Grisbi is F/OSS.

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Re:PLCash, too

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 08, 2005 10:16 PM
PLCash $ucks to me.

1. It's in Java.

2. It's *highly* non-intuitive: after creating a new acct, after inputting data, I did't know what to do to apply changes. I had to "move to next" so it asked me to save (or not) the changes.

Then, with an acct. open, what to do? BUTTONS are unexpressive!!!

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What about Grisbi ?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 08, 2005 08:32 PM
Grisbi is an easy personal finance manager

<a href="http://www.grisbi.org/index.en.html" title="grisbi.org">http://www.grisbi.org/index.en.html</a grisbi.org>

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Moneydance ROCKS!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 08, 2005 09:38 PM
Another vote for Moneydance. It's a mature product with no bugs, and does everything you need. Works great with online banking including billpay right from the interface etc.

Its a great program. I think its right on par with Quicken back before it got all tied into IE, ya know the GOOD quicken.

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Re:Moneydance ROCKS!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 08, 2005 10:11 PM
It's commercial.
Period.

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Re:Moneydance ROCKS!

Posted by: Administrator on November 08, 2005 11:44 PM
lol, hippy.

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Re:Moneydance ROCKS!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 11, 2005 03:46 AM
so here is a question. Moneydance runs on Java. Could you run this program on say, a PDA (like the Zaurus)? Or a phone?

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Re:Confused

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 09, 2005 04:37 AM
The license states something like you can only use it solely on one personal computer. It's not clear if it means it can't be installed on more than one personal computer. Legally, use and install may be the same. IANAL.

Also, the license states that it cannot be used in the operation of a service organization or for the benefit of another person or entity.

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Re:Confused

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 09, 2005 06:02 AM
IANAL = I Am Not A Lawyer

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GNUCash interface

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 09, 2005 07:29 AM
GTK2 support is coming to Gnucash in just a few weeks. Then it will be pretty and jump right to the top of the list.

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GnuCash is better than you give it credit for

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 09, 2005 08:26 AM
It's a little light on features, though, compared to Moneydance, and nowhere near the expanded functionality of Quicken 2005 Premiere.
Care to mention what features those two had that you'd like in GnuCash?

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GnuCash

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 09, 2005 08:28 AM
It's a little light on features, though, compared to Moneydance, and nowhere near the expanded functionality of Quicken 2005 Premiere.

Please elaborate. I found it better than both.

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Pretty shallow

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 09, 2005 09:26 AM
Wow, and I thought Joe Barr's reviews were shallow!! There is no comparison of features, robustness, usability, etc. But, I sure know which one's the author could install!?!!!?

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Online banking?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 09, 2005 09:47 AM
I see progress is finally being made for downloading transaction data. How about online payments? One of the key features of Quicken for me is online bill payment. I do not want to use my bank's web site in addition to an application. Also, the last time I tried WINE, the online features of Quicken did not work.

Until a viable means of doing online banking is available, Quicken (and Windows) can not be replaced. If all you want to do is track your money, GNUCash and spreadsheets have had that ability for years. I see nothing new in this review other than fancier looking products that do the same as before.

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Re:Online banking?

Posted by: Administrator on November 09, 2005 04:05 PM
Although it's been a year since a I really used Moneydance, I was able to pull down transactions as well as pay them through Moneydance.

The unfortunate thing is that I had to sadly migrate BACK to Quicken, because of a Quicken issue.

When you do a year-end archiving and use the "new" file (the one without last years transactions), quicken doesn't summarize and collapse some financial data -- mainly stock/mutual fund purchases . It just "hides" them.

When you export Quicken to a<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.QIF file for importing to Moneydance, all those hidden transactions come with it, making a mess in some of one's accounts. My thought is that these transactions are not "CLEARED" in Quicken (my choice up till now) and that clearing those transactions may get rid of the "mess". I'm working to eliminate that, but it was disturbing and is the reason I went back to Quicken 2003 for the time being. The only complication was re-establishing a password -- Moneydance opened the online account by asking me to change the banking account password. Quicken still had the old one. I had to make the account not online, then re-set it up to get a new password

If you don't track that type of detail in Quicken, I would suggest trying Moneydance -- plus it is available for both Linux and Windows.

Also, Quicken 2002-2004 IS supported quite well (almost flawlessly, and without the password re-set issue) by Crossover Office.

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gnucash

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 09, 2005 09:58 PM
Here's another vote for gnucash from a former Quicken user. I've been using gnucash for years. If gnucash doesn't have all the bells and whistles, I wouldn't know; I don't miss them at all.

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Re:gnucash

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 10, 2005 01:37 AM
what about VAT? Which of these packages can handle VAT.

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I use checkbook tracker

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 10, 2005 02:24 AM
<a href="http://tony.maro.net/mod.php?mod=userpage&page_id=4" title="maro.net">http://tony.maro.net/mod.php?mod=userpage&page_id<nobr>=<wbr></nobr> 4</a maro.net>

Fast, easy and GPL.

I used MoneyDance for about 3 or 4 years, until one day, after I installed a new version of Linux, when I installed my licensed copy of MD and tried to run it. It crashed. Seems that the old version of MD didn't like the new libraires. When I asked about a copy which would run under the new libraries I was told to fork over more money. That's one of the reasons why I left Window$ and Bill Gate$.

CheckBook Tracker has served me well for over a year now.

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Gnofin

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 10, 2005 02:29 AM
I use Gnofin on a daily basis, which does pretty much what I need. There's a pretty thorough list of alternatives at <a href="http://www.linuxlinks.com/Software/Financial/Personal_Finance/" title="linuxlinks.com">http://www.linuxlinks.com/Software/Financial/Pers<nobr>o<wbr></nobr> nal_Finance/</a linuxlinks.com>

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KMyMoney does do OFX and more besides

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 11, 2005 09:03 AM
KMyMoney does have an OFX plugin for direct banking. It also has a reports section that can export to CSV, and KDE's print engine has a built-in PDF export. So all that leaves is TXF export. Care to re-evaluate based on more than a 5 minute play?

John.

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Don't want to blow my own trumpet, but ...

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 14, 2005 07:40 PM
I actually wrote my own, which is kinda like a marriage of Quicken and Excel. The purpose is to spend five minutes a month for the book keeping. I am running a software consultancy business, and this application I wrote allows me to double check on what my accountant tells me at the end of the year. It is free and runs on Win32,Linux,OSX etc. using Java/SWT/db4o/JasperReports. Try <a href="http://www.transcraft.co.uk/book" title="transcraft.co.uk">http://www.transcraft.co.uk/book</a transcraft.co.uk>

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Moneydance

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on November 17, 2005 01:53 AM
Many programs don't put themselves into Gnome, or KDE menus. You can make your own shortcuts for both--it really isn't that hard. (You have to do the same for many programs in Windows, also--though I will admit, not, usually, finance programs.)
I used GnuCash for a while (several months)and couldn't really get used to the interface, or the just plain ugliness of it (sorry guys--user experience is important, to me). While the feature set is close to Moneydance's, it is lacking a couple things straight out of the box (and has some things that Moneydance lacks, conversely). It comes down to what you prefer, not necessarily feature sets, or freedom (as in freedom). I prefer Moneydance, because I find it easier to use, better looking, and has all the features that I need. Also, because it did a better job of importing my<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.qif files.

#

Poor article

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on December 08, 2005 10:08 PM
How much does one get for articles like this? Please post underneath, so I can apply!

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BADGER finance

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on April 08, 2007 06:45 PM
this is an alternative:
<a href="http://www.badger-finance.org/" title="badger-finance.org">http://www.badger-finance.org/</a badger-finance.org>

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Confused

Posted by: Administrator on November 09, 2005 12:38 AM
"you can use Moneydance on only one computer, you can't use it for commercial purposes,"

Do they just mean that for the free version, or can the thing in general not be used for commercial purposes?

That doesn't really make a whole lot of sense, it would seem to me like business use would be a significant market for this sort of program.

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ledger is the best

Posted by: Administrator on November 12, 2005 02:50 AM
ledger is a command line based double-entry finance application... and it rocks!
<a href="http://www.newartisans.com/ledger.html" title="newartisans.com">http://www.newartisans.com/ledger.html</a newartisans.com>

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Personal finance software for GNU/Linux

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 138.88.202.86] on August 24, 2007 05:31 AM
Terrible interface. Very confused.

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Personal finance software for GNU/Linux

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 82.234.134.43] on December 23, 2007 12:17 PM
So far none of the above mentionned software will satisfy my needs. They only seem to allow 1 category per transaction, I need all the 3 category lists that MsMoney offers. But I would like to switch to Linux and dump anything Microsoft. I suffered too much.

My accountant says my needs are highly unusual. I manage a dozen buildings and I found a very efficient and concentrated way of doing it, with MsMoney. However I want now to switch to Linux. And yes, to me it's still personal software as I'm the only one playing with it.

I keep track of all my documents (every piece of paper has a unique scan number ever since 1997) along with the accounting data in the same file. Unlike other businesses we need to also keep track of what happened a long time ago (e.g. when was that boiler fixed and what was done at the time, by whom?, what was done to justify a rent increase?, etc). Money shows me the relevant scan number and I made a small script to display it instantly.

For a typical transaction I need 3 categories, as follows, with an example:

1) accounting: Maintenance /sub-cat Building 08

2) Location : Building 08 / sub-cat : Apt.112

3) DocType: Bill / sub-cat : work-order (in that case, obviously, the $ will be zero)

Basically MsMoney is a database made prettier. Data entry is very convenient to me and reporting is mostly good, although limited.

I use the 1999 version as subsequent ones were not even able to load my 55Meg file. They just froze or became uselessly slow.

If I cannot find a suitable software, I will have to stick with MsM and use it under a virtual solution like VirtualBox. I tested it. It works with Win2K under Ubuntu, so far.

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My Money is the closest thing that comes close to M$ Money

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 208.204.155.241] on February 12, 2008 04:15 PM
Not free, but does read microsoft and quicken files just fine

www.mthbuilt.com

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Personal finance software for GNU/Linux

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 203.81.96.97] on February 23, 2008 01:05 AM
There is a GNU offering from http://www.grisbi.org/ -- a new PFM that runs under windows. It seems limited at first glance, but the price is right. Another problem is that its user manual is writen in French.

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Personal finance software for GNU/Linux

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 76.119.69.77] on March 01, 2008 02:18 AM
Free, reads quicken files. Needs JRE though - www.mjrz.net

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