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Commercial CAD/CAM for Linux?

By on May 28, 2003 (8:00:00 AM)

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- by Carl Brown -
I recently returned from my annual pilgramage to the Eastec 'Advanced Productivity Exposition' trade show in Springfield MA, billed as 'The East Coast's Largest Annual Manufacturing Event.' Every year since 1999, I have made the rounds there, asking all the CAD/CAM vendors at the show the same simple question: "Do you have any plans for a Linux version?" The answer has always been an unequivocal "No." The excuses varied, but not the policies.


Don't hold your breath waiting for any of the 'big boys' to jump. One Autocad rep said, "In five years, maybe. And then only if Linux has a visible 30% share of the corporate desktop, which I don't see happening."

Solidworks and many others were developed under Windows using all of Microsofts' best portability reduction enhancements. These companies believe that they would have to throw everything out and start over to create non-Windows versions. Because of this, they are at least as locked in to Microsoft as their customers are. They are scared of Linux, but they try to brush it off as a "fad." One smaller vendor said that they would wait for one of the 'big boys' to move first.

Even companies that started on Unix dropped the platform completely years ago and (claim to) have no feasible way to resurrect that branch of code for Linux. Thinking that the BSD core of OS X might lure some development back into the *nix direction, I asked about it specifically. Gibbs had a Mac version, but it was dropped two or three years ago and they have no plans to develop for OS X. In fact, the OS X situation is no better than Linux in this area. If you want CAD/CAM software, it's still Windows or nothing. It's as simple as that.

This year, however, marked an important first. One CAD/CAM software representative did not say "No." He said, "If I asked the developers how long it would take to have a Linux version ready, they would say two months." It seems that these developers have been doing all their work under Linux for some time, and the Windows version is essentially a port. The only thing they are waiting for is demand. He told me that I wasn't the only person who had asked him about a  Linux version at the show. If you've been waiting for a commercial 3D CAD/CAM package to become available for Linux, don't miss this opportunity to help prod Weber Systems into being the first to market. They are a relatively small company, so it wouldn't take many potential sales to get them going in the right direction fast.

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Support?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 28, 2003 09:28 PM
So everybody who needs CAD tools on Linux - now's the time to give Weber Systems your custom and money!

#

Re: Support?

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 66.83.225.202] on March 05, 2008 03:05 PM
Archicad is on OsX, doesn't that mean it will work on Linux?

#

CAD for Linux

Posted by: rjmatm on May 28, 2003 09:32 PM
I don't use CAD, but just a quick search with almighty Google and I got this.

<A HREF="http://www.linuxcad.com/" TITLE="linuxcad.com">http://www.linuxcad.com/</a linuxcad.com>

#

Reason why?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 05:08 AM
This linuxcad.com f#$%ker has been spamming zdnet.com forums for weeks. By posting this address as a comment to every article, he's made himself appear "above the fold" at Google. Since google ranks according to reference links, the fellow appears to be an authority. Guess what? By linking to him; you've just helped him; if you're not him... shame on you.

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Re:Reason why?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 11:03 AM
I apologize, I had no idea.

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Re:CAD for Linux

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 05:17 AM
Go to zdnet and find just one story without a spam from linuxcad?

Spamming aside the program sucks! Autocad Release1 from the early 80's had more features.

It does not even include a zoom option.

I am supprised Unix is no longer in the works. Cad/CAM I assumed was all still Unix only. After all Windows is way too reliable to run a manufactoring plant. Cad is one thing but Cam is something different.

I read this and also on slashdot about eye surgury places using Windows95! Scary as hell.

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Re:CAD for Linux

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 30, 2003 04:56 AM
I'm stunned. I am absolutely stunned. LinuxCAD has no zoom option? Who in their right mind would buy such a product???

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SGI??

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 28, 2003 09:33 PM
What about all the high end CAD software that runs on SGI machines used by Auto Manufacturers? Surely they would be a good candidate to port over to Linux. (Unfortunately, I forget the name of the software.)

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Re:SGI??

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 28, 2003 09:39 PM
The issues tend to be in marketing, not that there are no engineering resources to port the s/w.

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Re:SGI??

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 01:35 AM
If you're talking about PRO/ENGINEER, it has recently been <A HREF="http://www.tenlinks.com/NEWS/PR/PTC/012303_linux.htm" TITLE="tenlinks.com">
ported to Linux</a tenlinks.com>.

I don't know if <A HREF="http://homepages.internet-montblanc.fr/prolinux/petitio1.htm" TITLE="internet-montblanc.fr">
this petition</a internet-montblanc.fr> had anything to do with it, but it couldn't have hurt.

I used to use PRO/E on SGI machines back in the 90's when I studied
Mechanical Engineering.. I thought it was a great product, but I
don't work in the field, so I haven't had much to compare it to.

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Re:SGI??

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 07:23 AM
Other high-end CAD systems are CATIA (from Dassault Systemes, sold through IBM) and Unigraphics. Both are firmly established under UNIX and Microsoft platforms (CATIA is probably more stable on the UNIX side of things at the moment).

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Re:SGI??

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on June 01, 2003 02:19 AM
The product you are looking for is CATIA, from Dassault the French aerospace manufacturer. They also own SoildWorks mentioned in the story.

http://www.3ds.com/en/brands/catia_ipf.asp

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Surveying

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 28, 2003 09:40 PM
What about surveying apps for *nix? Surveyors like to use hardware for as long as it will work (486's incl). The surveying industry could really use some *nix-based cogo apps.

jwhal

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Re:Surveying

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 02:15 AM
Like this?? http://www.haspsoftware.com/ Unfortunately it's not OSS but it IS a Linux solution that works well.

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Why don't they make it available via download?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 28, 2003 09:45 PM
If the windows version is a port, why don't they sell directly via their website the linux version. They cut out marketing and distribution channels. They then can sell it for less than the windows packaged version. If they already have the product, selling only 10 copies every 6 months is more than they had by not selling it. If the demand is greater than expected, then they can market and sell it through the same channels as their windows product. Plus by making available to their current customers, it gives the customer a much easier transition to linux. Just knowing their software vendor will support their products during the transition can make all the difference, to those contemplating switching to linux.


Another no brainer is just to put both versions on the same media, little or no extra expense and another potential market opens up for them. It's what wolfram does with mathematica. What harm would that cause their current business model?

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CAE and Linux

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 28, 2003 10:03 PM
For electrical engineering applications, there exists whole multi-million dollar software apps from several companies. Such as, Synopsys, Cadence and Mentor. This software is used for electronic chip design. Previously, this was exclusively Sun workstation domain. By moving from a Sun box to a Intel/Linux box, the industry has seen 10x and higher performance gains. From jobs that used to take 12 hours, now can run in 1.

#

PTC Pro/ENGINEER works on Linux!

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 28, 2003 10:20 PM
The latest release of Pro/ENINGEER has a Linux version. The website is www.ptc.com but it is down now...

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CAD for free

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 28, 2003 10:43 PM
You will find very nice CAD software for Linux and Windows at:

http://www.qcad.org/index.php3

The software is GPLŽed

"Work hard, be plastic!"

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Re:CAD for free

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 28, 2003 11:06 PM
the problem is that qcad can't hold a candle to AutoCAD

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Re:CAD for free

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 04:15 AM
I agree. Until we have AutoCAD for Linux, a lot of architects and engineers are stuck in Windows.

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No big deal

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 07:11 AM
> Until we have AutoCAD for Linux, a lot of architects and engineers are stuck in Windows.

That's okay. The users who are stuck with Windows are shrinking to smaller and smaller groups of specialists, such as Autocad users. Eventually there will be enough pressure to port the niche applications so the remaining Windows stragglers can also move to Linux.

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Re:No big deal

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 11:21 PM
Bud, I really hope you're right. I'm tired of rebooting my computer multiple times a day. I want to work on a computer that just does the work and doesn't give me problems. I have that at home with Linux. I don't have that at work with Windows.

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Heck, not a candle to even TurboCad

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 11:15 PM
I downloaded and reviewed QCad to see how well it would fit my needs. I decided it was too primative for anything but transferring sketches off of napkins and back of envelopes. Good enough to pitch an idea, but not good enough to actually use for CAD.

#

2D Only

Posted by: static on May 30, 2003 03:14 AM
Looks like an alright visio replacement, but it doesn't do 3D. Case Closed. But thanks for that! I was looking for a linux equiv to visio!!

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Not Completely True

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 28, 2003 10:55 PM
"...If you want CAD/CAM software, it's still Windows or nothing. It's as simple as that..."

Humm, I'm sitting here at work next to a CATIA CAD system workstation running on IBM AIX. If you can design large wide-body commercial airplanes with it, it can't be too whimpy of a system. And I bet it would port to Linux real easy, too.

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Re:Not Completely True

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on June 04, 2003 04:53 AM
Hello,

I do not think so CATIA is code monster and if you look at CATIA V5 I do not think that this release will be easly ported to Linux. Instead Dassault is prefering MS over HP, SUN or even IBM.

Bye

#

There's always varicad

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 28, 2003 11:41 PM
I don't know much about CAD, but linux format magazine recently gave glowing review of a product called varicad (http://www varicad.com).

#

this is clearly bollox

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 28, 2003 11:50 PM
The only high end cad system i've used was on a Linux workstation (ProE) and that beats the crap out of Autocad in terms of features. It seems this is a situation where the major Windows vendors are busy trying to convince everyone that there is nothing available for Linux so as to prevent migration and protect their investments. More FUD anyone?

#

Re:this is clearly bollox

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 04:37 AM
It might beat AutoCAD, but we switched to Solidworks, and from our testing, IT beats the crap out of ProE.

So we're stuck with windows.

#

Solidworks vs. Pro/E.

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 04:57 AM
Pro/E has a much steeper learning curve than
Solidworks. And Pro/E pisses me off much of
the time, since I'm none to proficient with
it. But once you get into it, (a.k.a. a few
months later) it's more versatile and powerful
than Solidworks, best that I can tell.

If you are just a casual user though, you'd
probably be better off using SolidWorks.

jarboe

#

Re:Solidworks vs. Pro/E.

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 09:53 PM
Actually, that's the case here.

We were able to get seats for all of our engineers for solidworks, and it's really easy to pick up.

Hell, I have an electrical eng. background and have never used a lot of 2D CAD, but I'm drawing a lot of mechanical parts and assemblies fairly easy.

The company had bought 2 Pro/E seats years ago for $$$ and the 2 best autocad jocks here couldn't even be productive in it. So, for the work we do, Solidworks is the best solution.

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It's the middle tier that's missing

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 12:39 AM
There are both high end and low end CAD systems for Linux but there is nothing but a vacant space in the middle. Sure someone can go out and get qcad or linuxcad cheap and they can spend between seven and twenty grand for a seat of Pro/E. In the middle tier, where many people work, there is inventor, solid works, solid edge and a few others which are priced in one to four thousand dollar range. This is where smaller shops operate because the cheaper stuff doesn't get the job done and they can get by without the features of a Catia or Pro/E. I'd wager that larger shops are going to realize that they can get by at a much lower cost by dropping to this middle ground. Let's face it if you have the option of a) one SolidWorks seat and one Pro seat or b) two Pro seats, which do you pick if the work output is the same and option 'a' saves you ten grand?

#

Re:It's the middle tier that's missing

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 04:29 AM
It's really SolidWorks for $5k a seat with no upgrade path on only Windows or Pro/E Foundation for $5k a seat with the option to spend big bucks for upgrades and get it on either Windows or Linux. Two seats with the same functionality cost the same. Now some will say that SolidWorks has more features / easier features than Pro/E Foundation. They may be right.

#

Re:It's the middle tier that's missing

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 11:05 PM
Check it yourself with any ProE reseller.

A basic ProE-license has more functionality and costs less than or as much as Solid Works, inventor etc.

Amazing but true

#

is this (nearly) a no-brainer?

Posted by: gus3 on May 29, 2003 01:28 AM
If it's Windows or nothing, how about running it inside WINE?

#

Re:is this (nearly) a no-brainer?

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 30, 2003 12:47 AM
The answer is simple. WINE is not the holy grail that will run Windows programs flawlessly.

#

Re:is this (nearly) a no-brainer?

Posted by: Azizcoos on May 30, 2003 03:48 AM
Correct. For example, Solidworks is entwined with everything from Access databases to platform-specific video modes and 3D rendering. The chances of getting it all to work under wine are slim to none.

The kick in the pants is that there already are open source building blocks for many large parts of a CAD/CAM system lying around the net.

#

CAD/CAM in Linux

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 02:51 AM
I use CAD/CAM for a different thing altogether, I use it to make signs and vehicle graphics.. The typical sign making packages (for Windows) run $3000 or so. I've been using CorelDRAW! with an overlay program (a HPGL conversion module?) called CoCut. Cocut alone cost me $400 with one hardware key. I'm currently seeking a Linux solution. I'm thinking of using OpenOffice Draw (which is very Corel-like) if I could only find a way to get the vector image to plotter..

Any suggestions? Please email me, I know a bunch of other folks seeking a Linux solution to this problem as well.

Debrihmi2000@yahoo.com

#

Re:CAD/CAM in Linux

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 04:06 AM
If you are using Corel Draw, take a look at scribus. It's supposed to do similar (page layout) tricks. I'm not a programmer, so I can't help but point.

And I'd definitely like to see further development of scribus, as I really need a page layout/brochure/flyer/menu creator.

#

Re:CAD/CAM in Linux

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 01:45 PM

Maybe Gimp? (http://www.gimp.org)

#

Re:CAD/CAM in Linux

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 30, 2003 09:52 PM
ImageMagick (http://www.imagemagick.org/) can
apparently convert most anything to HPGL.

#

Re:CAD/CAM in Linux

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 31, 2003 12:53 PM



See also

    http://www.futuredesktop.org

   



    Look for these sections:

        CAD & CAM



        DRAW




  All the best,

    http://www.futuredesktop.org


   

#

Microsoft bundling

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 03:10 AM
I hope Microsoft comes out with their own CAD program, bundles it with the OS, and puts everyone else out of business. That would be funny . . . in a pathetic "I told you so" way. But I'm not sure if the CAD market is big enough to be worth MS's time.

#

Re:Microsoft bundling

Posted by: Mandrake Magician on May 29, 2003 12:32 PM
Microsoft has an operating system? When did this happen? Why doesn't anybody tell me these things? Where's my bunny?

#

Re:Microsoft bundling

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 01:35 PM

I'm not sure MS has ever done anything but *buy* their own version of anything.

#

Re:Microsoft bundling

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 05:12 PM
Yes it was called softimage. It sold poorly because the windows version scripting sucked. Softimage is known for its scripting and not gui interface. Eventually MS gave up and sold it to a german firm. Part of the NT4 team worked on it to make W2k and NT faster dealing with graphics software packages.

The unix version is still out there are quite popular. I do not know if the win32 version is though.

#

The reason why some vendors will stay small

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 03:16 AM
"One smaller vendor said that they would wait for one of the 'big boys' to move first."

Ah, the sound of second-rate management at work. The reason why some vendors stay small is that they have small-time management at the helm.

Try to win business away from the big boys? Try to develop a break-through business plan? Nah, we're content to stay an also-ran, thank you.

Pitiful.

#

Re:The reason why some vendors will stay small

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 31, 2003 08:53 AM
If it is the same vendor I am thinking of now, they are now owned by EDS.

EDS BTW is doing the opposite of what PTC is doing. They are going to move their data management stuff to Linux and wait a bit for the desktop...

One could be running PTC Pro Engineer with data being managed by TeamCenter Engineering soon.

#

Try Pro/E Wildfire

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 04:24 AM
Pro/E Wildfire supports Linux today. Have not used it but I have the discs in my office...

#

Re:Try Pro/E Wildfire

Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 11:09 PM
It works faster and better than on Windows

#

The groundwork is available: OpenCASCADE

Posted by: vinsci on May 29, 2003 04:58 AM
<A HREF="http://www.opencascade.com/" TITLE="opencascade.com">OpenCASCADE</a opencascade.com>, has been open source for a couple of years.

It's a <A HREF="http://www.opencascade.com/news/news/68/" TITLE="opencascade.com">very comprehensive piece of industry quality source code</a opencascade.com>, supported by a large commercial team.

Note that there's two sites:

  • <A HREF="http://www.opencascade.org/" TITLE="opencascade.org">http://www.opencascade.org/</a opencascade.org>
  • <A HREF="http://www.opencascade.com/" TITLE="opencascade.com">http://www.opencascade.com/</a opencascade.com>

    OpenCASCADE should be a great framework to build high-quality applications on. There's a humble beginning called <A HREF="http://www.exotk.org/" TITLE="exotk.org">exoTK</a exotk.org>, based on OpenCASCADE. See this <A HREF="http://www.exotk.org/images/exoTKAD-screen3.jpg" TITLE="exotk.org">screenshot</a exotk.org>, for example.

    #

  • PCB CAD Software

    Posted by: trawler on May 29, 2003 05:02 AM
    CadSoft Computer GmbH offer the Eagle editor for those of us interested in designing PCB's (Printed circuits) under Linux (or windoze, if you must!). They offer a reduced-capability version for download. Well worth looking at<nobr> <wbr></nobr>...

    #

    Re:PCB CAD Software

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on June 01, 2003 02:38 AM
    I agree Eagle's great. An the evaluation version
    is quite functional.

    #

    CAD/CAE is Alive and Well on Linux

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 07:51 AM
    Odd that the CAD/CAM software market is so mired in the Windows market...

    Those of us in the CAE/CAD arena (integrated circuit design, PCB design, simulation, parasitic extraction, etc.) have been enjoying Linux products from Cadence, Mentor Graphics, Synoposys, and others for a couple of years now. Of course, it is Sun/IBM/HP Unices that are being displaced, not Windows.
    My CAD department, like others that I know of, has stopped ordering UNIX workstations in favor of MUCH cheaper, MUCH faster Linux based PCs.
    Sounds like Linux easily displaces UNIX, but still has a pretty tough time against Windows.

    #

    Re:CAD/CAE is Alive and Well on Linux

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on June 03, 2003 08:05 PM
    Many have claimed that Microsoft is a great marketing company. Less have claimed that it is a great product.

    #

    mmm..

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 11:36 AM
    Xfree86 is to slow for CAD/CAM<nobr> <wbr></nobr>...

    #

    Re:mmm..

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 01:05 PM
    Xfree86 is to slow for CAD/CAM<nobr> <wbr></nobr>...

    ----

    How about opengl then?

    #

    Re:mmm..

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 01:25 PM
    Too fast<nobr> <wbr></nobr>...

    #

    I'm Calling BS.

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 01:29 PM

    Windows is not the only option for cad.

    Pro/e, Catia, SDRC and others were originally written for and are still supported on most UNIX variants.

    Pro/e is now ported to linux. The supported system is said to be an HP with a P4 chip running RH7.3 (I think) but that any P4 system running RedHat should work.

    Pro/e was ported (in Germany) to linux 2 years ago. I don't have the link, but SGI and PTC worked on it together.

    #

    Re:I'm Calling BS.

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 30, 2003 12:49 AM
    If my office switches from AutoCAD To Pro/e, do you volunteer to train us how to use it or to pay for the retraining?

    #

    Re:I'm Calling BS.

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 30, 2003 01:42 AM
    How did the office workers learn AutoCAD in the first place? Did the company train them? Or did they advertise for the job requiring CAD experience? To learn another CAD system after being an expert on another is not a big step. If it is, then the employee only knows what buttons to push to get a result and doesn't understand why a plane in 3D-space would need to be defined, for example.

    #

    Re:I'm Calling BS.

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 30, 2003 03:01 AM
    Agreed, this is BS. The author thinks "CAD/CAM" is spelled "AUTOCAD", and is therefore a dolt. There was a unix AutoCad, that disappeared about version 11. AutoCad on linux will appear after AutoDesk gets M$'s foot off their neck.

    #

    Re:I'm Calling BS.

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 31, 2003 02:24 AM
    Yes, that's right - R12, as a matter of fact - and it ran much, much, much fast under Solaris (at least) than Windows.

    #

    Pro/ENGINEER Wildfire supports LINUX today!

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 07:37 PM
    PTC announced full support for LINUX back in January. I believe they were definitely the first major player in the CAD/CAM space to support LINUX. You can get more details about the announcement on PTC's web site <A HREF="http://www.ptc.com/appserver/it/icm/cda/template_lib/icm01_cda_text_w_sub.jsp?im_dbkey=4363" TITLE="ptc.com"> HERE </a ptc.com>

    www.ptc.com

    #

    AutoCAD compatibility library

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 08:35 PM

    Anyone interested in working on an AutoCAD<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.dwg compatibility library with me?


    Thanks to the good work by the people at the <A HREF="http://www.opendwg.org/" TITLE="opendwg.org">Open DWG alliance</a opendwg.org>, I am working on an AutoCAD compatibility library for Linux. I need help - programmers specifically. If interested, please visit my <A HREF="http://www.lns-saginaw.net/libdwg.php" TITLE="lns-saginaw.net">libdwg page</a lns-saginaw.net>.


    Ron

    #

    Linux why not everyone else is doing it

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 08:48 PM
    Hollywood is doing it!
    FEA is doing it!
    Electronic design is doing it!

    Running CAD on UNIX is hurting right now not because of the OS but because the hardware is 3/4 times the price with half the performance. But now if we can have the same hardware with a superior OS (Linux) we would be all set.

    Being open source they can even ship a tweaked OS on the same CD as the CAD software.

    It is to bad to see a good CAD system (CATIA) going the wrong direction. With there new V5 version (V5 for 5 years now) is in bed with windows pretty tight. I have heard that CATIA could be portd to Linux pretty easy if the demand was there put I think that was V4 and not V5.

    #

    I guess no one has seen this - Free 3D for Linux

    Posted by: nemat0de on May 29, 2003 10:28 PM
    http://www.hoops3d.com/downloads/linux/linux.htm

    snip-
    In effort to promote the development of advanced 3D desktop and web-based applications for the rapidly growing Linux platform, Tech Soft America is offering Linux developers a free personal use license of the HOOPS 3D Application Framework (HOOPS/3dAF).

    This is a 3D App. builder for linux based on the parasolid kernel. just look at some of the partners using the windows version(not free)
    http://www.hoops3d.com/partners/partners.htm

    If all of these companies are using the windows version a port to linux shouldn't be a problem.

    #

    Pro/ENGINEER is on linux, but they no PDm

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 10:39 PM
    PTC has ported Pro/E to Linux, but the have not ported the PDM package (Pro/INTRALINK) to linux. The latest version based on Oracle/Java so it should be possible. Until a PDM system is running on Linux large CAD/CAM/CAE department will not use it.

    #

    Re:Pro/ENGINEER is on linux, but they no PDm

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 11:17 PM
    I heard from one at PTC that the PDM-package Pro/Intralink is under development for Linux. But I have not heard from anyone the offical way

    #

    PTC Pro/E Wildfire Announcement

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 10:51 PM
    http://www.ptc.com/appserver/it/icm/cda/template_<nobr>l<wbr></nobr> ib/icm01_cda_text_w_sub.jsp?im_dbkey=4363&im_lang<nobr>u<wbr></nobr> age=en

    #

    Varkon

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 29, 2003 11:54 PM
    Has anyone tried varkon?

    #

    Re:Varkon

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on June 01, 2003 03:53 AM
    Yes, it has a scripting language that makes it capable of outputing G-code. Of course the script needs to be written. I have been told that this has been done before, although it was done back when varkon wasn't GPL.
    I think that there is a lot of potential in it. I have been playing with Varkon for a couple of years, although not seriously.

    #

    Something I found in linux journal

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 30, 2003 12:41 AM
    VariCAD
    http://www.varicad.com

    #

    I said CAD/CAM, not CAD

    Posted by: Azizcoos on May 30, 2003 03:36 AM
    Several commentors seem to have missed that point. Yes, I am aware that there are various CAD systems available for Linux and Unix. I have no experience with CATIA or ProE, so I can't comment on those.

    The survey was restricted to CAD/CAM software vendors. CAD/CAM is much rarer and more specialized than general purpose CAD programs, and is much more general purpose than circuit board design tools.

    Carl Brown

    #

    Re:I said CAD/CAM, not CAD

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 31, 2003 03:05 AM
    That is true. CAD and CAM are different.

    I suppose the confusion might stem from the mentioning (as pseudo-proof?) that neither 'Solidworks' nor 'Autocad' offer anything other than Windows stuff. Plus, I don't know that either offers their own CAM software but am quite certain that both have CAD software. Therefore, one might be lead to believe that you're speaking more about CAD stuff than CAM stuff.

    Exploring this just a little further: Catia, SDRC, and PTC have both CAD and CAM packages. Moreover, each offers Unix versions. Therefore, your statement, "If you want CAD/CAM software, it's still Windows or nothing. It's as simple as that." is perhaps in error.

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    CAD/CAM on Linux

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 30, 2003 05:06 AM
    Linux has needed this for a long time. I work for a house-hold name CAD/CAM vendor, and the boss not only doesn't care about porting to other platforms, he's deliberately ignoring them. Too many customers have asked me for Linux versions. I'm writing my own using QT for portability because of problems not getting resolved and features not getting added. Linux, Windoze, OS/X - here I come.

    QCad just doesn't cut it, nor does Varicad, although Varicad at least looks nice.

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    Re:CAD/CAM on Linux

    Posted by: nemat0de on May 30, 2003 08:09 PM
    Does your boss give you any reasons for ignoring linux?
    I know of several shops that are on the virge of switching to linux except for ine thing, their MC or Gibbs won't work.
    Your little project sounds interesting i'd like more info.

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    Re:CAD/CAM on Linux

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 31, 2003 01:03 AM
    I hope you wont get in trouble...I started some own project some years ago, unrelated to the stuff I was working on as an employee, however I was told that everything I made could be considered the properties of the employer...Since then I learned to keep my mouth shut<nobr> <wbr></nobr>:)

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    Re:CAD/CAM on Linux

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on June 06, 2003 01:33 PM
    I would be happy to discuss details of Weber Systems plans and advantages. and why we are supporting Linux. Bob Mc Pherson bobm@webersys.com URL:webersys.com

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    CAD on OS X

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 30, 2003 05:26 AM
    Vectorworks has been around for years on MacOS and OS x. If you need more specialized stuff, they have that too.

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    What's running on Beowulf clusters?

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 30, 2003 06:39 PM
    Last I checked, most Linux supercomputers, clusters or mainframes, were being used for fluid dynamic, electromagnetic, or solid dynamic (stress waves in solids) modelling. If that is not CAD I don't know what is!

    The D in CAD stands for Design, not Drawing, despite what AutoCAD might want people to believe.

    Obviously, there a plenty of front end drawing and gridding packages for Linux, and plenty of back end scientific/engineering display packages.
    The CAM part of CAD/CAM is little more than feeding a file of a standard format into a machine tool. The machine tool uses an embedded operating system of one type or another, usually OS-9, but I've seen Linux and OS/2 in use also.

    This may be the dumbest article ever posted on NewsForge!

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    Re:What's running on Beowulf clusters?

    Posted by: Azizcoos on May 30, 2003 07:51 PM
    That's D for Design alright, meaning for designing parts. Fluid dynamics may be used in design, but it's not CAD as commonly known.

    The CAM part is a LOT more than feeding a file to a machine tool. It's designing and calculating the required toolpath(s)to cut the part, which is a lot more complicated and difficult than it sounds to someone who is obviously unfamiliar with it.

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    Re:What's running on Beowulf clusters?

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 31, 2003 07:35 PM
    About half those parts will be handling fluids. Tool paths are mostly calculated by the CAD program running on the big box, not in the machine tool except for machine specific details.

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    Proe under Linux

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on May 31, 2003 09:35 PM
    I run almost every day Proe Wildfire under linux. It runs perpectly in my lapton Dimension 8100 with nvidia graphic card. I use SuSE 8.1.
    I also tried the W$ version of Wildfire and it is exactly the same (even the same bugs).
    I have been using exclusively Linux at work for more that 1 year and I don't need at all W$. Now its time for Siemens, Omrom,... that port their PLC programs to linux too (Siemens did it with LogoSoft using Java).

    ppd

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    Re:Proe under Linux

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on June 03, 2003 07:56 PM
    I would love to here/see Wildfire benchmarks using the same hardware but different OS.

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    Are your crazy?

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on June 02, 2003 04:43 PM
    Just the fact that linux is stable and good does'nt mean that all the whole software that exists in the world should be ported to linux. CAD/CAM software requires intensive design/programming testing etc which have costed all these companies millions perhaps billions of dollars. So the question is "Why change a running system? ". The CAD/CAM users dont care a damn whether its on a Windows/Unix or MAC. for them it should work and it is working fine!! So dumb your stupid argument for linux.

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    Re:Are your crazy?

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on June 03, 2003 07:53 PM
    "Just the fact that linux is stable and good " - You think just like some of the CAD/CAM software developers. As a CAD/CAM user performance is key! Some spend BIG dollars for unix workstations that where tailored for just CAD/CAM. Who cares if it did not do office apps. Well that has changed and thanks to Linux one can Have "good and stable" platform with a ton of other useful apps for Designer/engineer to get there job done effieciantly.

    It is the hardware that windows is running on that is excelling the Unix workstations not the OS.

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    AutoCAD on OS X

    Posted by: Anonymous Coward on June 03, 2003 06:53 AM
    >Thinking that the BSD core of OS X might lure some development back into the *nix direction, I asked about it specifically.

    Well, Apple recently posted this on their Hot News page
    >AutoCAD for Mac OS X The AutoCAD product manager would like to hear from people interested in having Autodesk develop AutoCAD for Mac OS X. Let him know what you think. [May 13]

    Their link is to his email address, eric.stover at autodesk.com. Send an email and you will get a survey (designed for CAD users) to fill out. I am not yet using CAD, but I think those who use it and want it on a *nix platform should jump at this opportunity.

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    Unigraphics works on *nix

    Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 75.49.83.79] on November 03, 2007 04:37 PM
    In fact, it was created in 1969. Where was Bill back then?

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