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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

By Bruce Byfield on October 02, 2007 (9:00:00 AM)

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How does the current version of OpenOffice.org (OOo) compare with Microsoft Office in its ability to produce slide presentations? The last time I tried to answer that question, two years ago, both OOo Impress and Microsoft PowerPoint had features that the other lacked. To see how the two programs compare now, I installed Microsoft Office 2007 and OpenOffice.org 2.3, and went through the process of designing a slide show from start to finish. To my surprise, the results were more decisive than in my last comparison. They're not enough to award a knockout victory, but, even based on points, the winner is clear.

Starting the creation of a presentation in the Office 2007 version of PowerPoint is different in several ways from earlier versions. First, the Autosummarize feature in Microsoft Word is no longer part of the default interface, so you can no longer easily create a slide show from the outline headings in a text document. Microsoft TechNet explains that Autosummarize was removed because it was a "low use feature." Personally, I am glad that version 2.3 of OOo Writer retains the equivalent Abstract feature.

Second, in 2007, PowerPoint no longer starts with a wizard. The removal might be justified on the grounds that, these days, everybody knows how to create a slide show. Still, Impress 2.3's opening wizard continues to be handy way of setting up a slide show's basic design, no matter what your level of expertise. If you don't like the wizard, you can easily bypass it by clicking the Create button at any time.

PowerPoint 2007 also departs from earlier versions' tradition of choosing a background at the start. Instead, it opens on a plain white slide, leaving you the option of choosing another background from the Design tab. This change might encourage users to focus more on content than design -- an idea that the noticeably sedate backgrounds installed with PowerPoint seems to bear out. Inn comparison, Impress once more remains unchanged.

All these changes seem unnecessary, and would ordinarily give Impress the advantage in this category. However, one thing that hasn't changed is that Impress continues to come with two amateurish backgrounds, while PowerPoint includes 20 backgrounds with the installation and includes a link to more online. The convenience of this selection alone is enough to give PowerPoint the edge.

Verdict: PowerPoint. You can search for more Impress templates online, but OOo could at least include a built-in link to them.

Editing window layout

Like the rest of Microsoft Office 2007, PowerPoint uses ribbons, which are combination menus and toolbars, instead of the traditional menus Impress still uses. Unlike Microsoft Word's chaotically arranged ribbons, PowerPoint's are well-organized, but, after five minutes' use, on the whole, they seem neither better nor worse than Impress's menus -- only different.

Below the menus, PowerPoint's editing window is divided into two panes: one for all the slides in the show, and another for the current slide. To this arrangement, Impress adds a Tasks pane on the right in the default view that toggles between master pages and slide layouts -- elements relegated in PowerPoint to the Design ribbon and the right-click menu for slides, respectively.

What you think of Impress's three-pane view will probably depend largely on your monitor or work habits. At full-screen resolution, or on a 19-inch or greater wide screen monitor, it is convenient, but, at any other size, or on a small monitor, the active slide is too small to edit. However, unlike in PowerPoint, the left and right panes in Impress can be detached to become floating windows that you can move as needed on the screen. Add this convenience to the tabs to change the view in the central pane, and Impress's design makes features more accessible than PowerPoint's.

Verdict: Impress.

Available slide layouts and transitions

Choosing slide layouts and transitions are two basic operations in presentation designs. Impress offers 20 slide layouts to PowerPoint's nine, and although several of Impress's are covered by one of PowerPoint's, they are still more convenient for thinking about your selection of material.

With slide transitions, PowerPoint has a slight edge, boasting 58 to Impress's 55. However, the real advantage of PowerPoint's slide transitions is that they are arranged visually into categories, as opposed to Impress's alphabetical list. In both programs, you can test slide transitions on the current slide.

Verdict: Tie.

Drawing tools,charts, and graphs

In previous releases, the fact that Impress shared a basic engine with OOo Draw gave it an advantage when it came to tools for diagrams and organizational charts. However, while Impress has remained largely the same, PowerPoint has achieved approximate equality with the Illustration and Text panes on the Insert ribbon.

Conversely, with OOo 2.3's new charting subsystem, Impress has caught up to PowerPoint in graphs based on spreadsheet information. Both programs now give professional-looking, easily editable charts, with the only difference being the default color schemes for the graphs.

Verdict: Tie.

Tables

PowerPoint has had a table tool for at least a decade. Impress, however, still lacks one, although, like PowerPoint, it can import a spreadsheet or a text file to achieve the same effect. Alternatively, you can cobble a table together using a series of rectangles, but the point remains: Why should you have to?

Verdict: PowerPoint.

Movies and slides

When I last compared slide shows two years ago, Impress only supported .wav, .aif, and .au sound and movie formats. In the releases since then, Impress has added support for QuickTime, MIDI, MPEG, and WAVE formats, giving it a rough parity with PowerPoint, except for the continued lack of support for MP3 audio files.

However, Impress continues to lag because of its inability to control the playing of sound across a series of slides, or to record a narration directly from the program..

Verdict: PowerPoint.

Preparing slide shows

In either Impress or PowerPoint, you can rehearse timings for a finished slide show or create multiple custom shows that consist of selected slides. However, each has features that the other lacks. PowerPoint, for instance, offers a choice of resolutions at which to play a show, while Impress has options such as using the mouse as a pointer and using the OOo Navigator as an aid for jumping between separated slides.

Perhaps the most important of these unique features is PowerPoint's Package for CD, which copies all necessary files for the presentation. Of course, it is easy enough to copy all of a presentation's files from outside Impress, but doing so within the program is a convenience that gives PowerPoint a slight edge. Admittedly, the feature raises questions about distributing proprietary fonts, but, if the same functionality were available in Impress, you could easily sidestep such questions by using only free fonts.

Verdict: PowerPoint.

And the winner is ...

Both Impress and PowerPoint are adequate for average slide show designers. Where one has an advantage in a particular category, that advantage is usually small.

However, Impress is advancing neither as far nor as fast as might be expected. Most significantly, despite some improvements, it continues to lag behind in its use of sound.

In comparison, PowerPoint starts from a more complete feature base, and, in places where it was behind Impress, such as graphics, it has largely caught up to Impress in the latest version.

Of course, if you extend your concern beyond functionality, in some ways Impress has advantages over PowerPoint. Unlike PowerPoint, its design is closer to that of other programs in its office suite. Even more importantly, it is undoubtedly the most advanced slide show program available in free software. However, unlike OOo Writer, Impress still has a ways to go before it matches its Microsoft Office counterpart.

Bruce Byfield is a computer journalist who writes regularly for Linux.com.

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on Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Note: Comments are owned by the poster. We are not responsible for their content.

Impress *does* have tables, sorta

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 24.215.205.191] on October 02, 2007 01:36 PM
Import... Spreadsheet creates an embedded spreadsheet that acts just like a table. You can resize columns, create all sorts of visual effects, just like a table. The only downside compared to a traditional table feature is that formatting can get weird if you resize your table after creating it. Otherwise, it works just fine.

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Re: Impress *does* have tables, sorta

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 204.137.64.112] on October 02, 2007 05:50 PM
That was mentioned

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Re: Impress *does* have tables, sorta

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 80.163.42.55] on October 04, 2007 11:39 PM
Remember: embedded objects in writer/impress: resizing is very different depending on if you double-click the object before resizing!

Resizing without double clicking _scales_ the object

Resizing after double clicking selects the area to be shown.

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 200.107.49.51] on October 02, 2007 02:34 PM
He doesn't mention the performance advantage of MS Office. Many users fire up Impress (or any OOo program) for the first time, and after waiting 60 seconds, immediately uninstall the suite. It's truly ridiculous. In Impress, loading is slow, slideshow mode is slow, multimedia is terribly slow, transitions are jerky, and memory usage is terribly high.

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Re: disagree with you...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 208.228.181.183] on October 02, 2007 06:43 PM
MS Office loads into memory when you are trying to complete the login to your desktop after a boot. You get penalized every time you bring up your system. It loads to memory which robs performance from the machine even when you are not using it. You can set up Open Office to do the same with quicklauncher feature (if you so desire) and it will appear to be much quicker. Open Office will stay resident in memory as long as you have it configured for. With MS Office you do not get a choice, it is a memory hog as long as it is installed on the system. You should get more aquainted with Open Office, it is far more capable than you give credit for.

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Re(1): disagree with you...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 200.107.49.51] on October 02, 2007 08:11 PM
>>You should get more aquainted with Open Office, it is far more capable than you give credit for.

Well, I should mention that I use OpenOffice every single day, and I personally do not even own MS Office. But I used MS Office daily at work, and it is undeniably faster in almost all aspects. The comment about MS Office preloading is extremely common, but not exactly true. There are many Windows components that are re-used in MS Office, thus making it more resource efficient. But these Windows components and subsystems need to be up running anyway in order for Windows to function. MS Office therefore makes wise use of shared resources, in contrast to OpenOffice, which, due to its cross-platform nature, re-implements almost everything and shares little in common with the host OS. But if you install install a fresh copy of Windows and record your memory before installing MS Office, you will find that the memory usage after installing MS Office and rebooting is essentially the same. OpenOffice with quickstarter, on the other hand, uses hundreds of MB of memory, and there's nothing else in the system that makes use of it.

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Re(2): disagree with you...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 208.228.181.183] on October 02, 2007 09:01 PM
"But these Windows components and subsystems need to be up running anyway in order for Windows to function". The big problem with this statement is that I am not running Windows and don't want anything to do with it. You do not have a choice in the matter when running Windows. You must deal with all of the bloat on the MS Platform as MS dictates. I don't see that as a positive, but I digress...
There are other options which allow more integration. I am not assuming Windows-only here. Cross platform is another feature that was not discussed in the article. Is that important? I guess it depends on the requirments--I would say that it is. Microsoft only interoperates with Microsoft--by plan, which is very bad--customer lockin. Open Office interoperates with many others including Star Office, KOffice, and others, and on other platforms--BIG plus. Open Office document format ODF (open document format - ISO ratified) is another big advantage for Open Office.
Vista is a resource hog, so when you add MS Office to that you still have a resource hog. There is nothing "efficient" about the Microsoft platform. IMHO the Microsoft platform represents an overall system that requires far more hardware, $$, and time to use and maintain.

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 72.77.208.233] on October 02, 2007 02:46 PM
I suppose the most fundamental question to ask as with any software or hardware acquisition would be to answer a question that most fail to answer and that is what are you planning on doing with it, what job do you really need to accomplish. Many just jump in and only begin to answer these questions after they have already spent their money and then complain that what they have doesn't do what they need it to do. This article is useful for those few that actually consider the answers to this question. I suppose you have to decide if the features that Open Office and specifically Impress lacks in comparison is really worth paying the premium to MS for MS Office. For me even when I was still working and I had the latest MS Office installed I still preferred Open Office, it did everything I ever wanted to accomplish and it did not have that annoying Klippy or what ever it was called. The one advantage for me that may not apply to everyone is since I dual boot and use Linux most of the time using Open Office meant that I only had to learn one programs interface and features as it is the same on both platforms.

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Impress (2.3) does play sound across a series of slides

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 71.16.143.71] on October 02, 2007 03:39 PM
Article quote: "However, Impress continues to lag because of its inability to play sound across a series of slides, or to use a recorded narration."

It is said that Impress 2.3 will play sound across slides. I tested it last night, and it does play the background sound the same way PowerPoint does (or similar, I'm not an expert on this).

Please, correct me if I'm wrong.

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Re: Impress (2.3) does play sound across a series of slides

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 83.45.76.230] on October 09, 2007 08:02 PM
I could play music all way the slide presentation in the 2.3 version of OOImpress from documents coming fromPPoint, I couldn´t do that in the 2.2 version. Great! But I must touch the pointer so that the presentation of slides has to advance. Luis.

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 129.130.52.3] on October 02, 2007 05:31 PM
The more I use OOo, the less I like it. Interesting article. I recently tried the cruel joke known as OpenOffice Draw. Wow. That's all I can say. If there were ever a more overpromoted free software product, I don't know what it would be. Sounds like I'm not the only one who sees weaknesses.

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Re: Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 69.219.159.199] on October 02, 2007 06:20 PM
If you had put at least a couple of detailed criticisms about why you found Draw so lacking, your credibility would seem a little more valid. Posting a rant about Draw to an Impress vs. PowerPoint article (which I found to be very informative by the way) is really odd anyway.

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Re(1): Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 208.228.181.183] on October 02, 2007 06:28 PM
I agree with you. He/She probably prefers using Microsoft word to create drawings. This has nothing to do with presentation, although I typically add Open Office draw diagrams to my Impress presentations. I think OO draw is a great tool.

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Draw is decent for basic DTP

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 143.166.226.43] on October 02, 2007 11:23 PM
I like Draw for setting up relatively short tutorial documents with screenshots. I haven't compiled any lately, but the ability to put text and graphics exactly where you want it is exactly what Draw gives you. It definitely has its place.

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Re(1): Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 70.179.187.236] on October 03, 2007 03:05 AM
I'm not asking for credibility. I'm not posting an article. I'm giving a summary of my experiences as a comment on the author's article. I don't need to prove anything to you to tell the author I agree with his assessment based on my experiences with OOo. And no, I don't use Word (in case you didn't notice, there's no Linux version).

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missed category

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 69.229.238.138] on October 02, 2007 05:39 PM
in my opinion one huge criterion is the ability to export to html - how much work does it take to put this presentation on the Web and, once there, how good does it look? (this means, for example, I can attach my training to my web-based application.)

in earlier versions, Impress was okay while Impress was usable.

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Re: missed category

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 204.137.64.112] on October 02, 2007 05:52 PM
PowerPoint can do this but I'm not sure about Impress

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Re(1): missed category - W3C compliant.

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 208.228.181.183] on October 02, 2007 09:10 PM
Open Office Impress does a great job at exporting a presentation for web use. Very fast. Simple point and click. File Export... Open Office Writer does a fantastic job with HTML for web and Calc (spreadsheet) does the same for web. These Open Office apps work FAR better than the MS Office counterparts in this regard and present a standardized W3C format that look great in any browser--not just MS Exploder.

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Use LaTeX for presentations :) Its far more professional

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 192.168.6.67] on October 02, 2007 06:04 PM
Personally I don't like both.
However with PP2007 I created nice presentation very quickly, but it didn't open correctly at the conference computer.
Then at another talk I modified previously created presentation with OOo. I had to rewrite all formulas. But then I exported to PDF and it opened correctly.

However both of them don't allow me to use data and text from my LaTeX articles, and even EPS pictures.
Also both approaches are WYSIWYG and the file produced doesn't contain understandable source. If I place them in my SVN repository, I will be unable to trace changes and merge different versions.

What I found recently --- is the possibility to create beautiful scientific presentations with LaTeX package "beamer".
In LaTeX I can create my own commands. For example, standard slide with 3 plots and 3 captions is defined by 6 variables.
I can use sources of my articles and the source of presentation is understandable.
Also I can include files with some "global variables", e.g. I have one file with stuff like official addresses and so on, and different articles, presentations reffer to this file.

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Re: Beamer rocks - great post

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 208.228.181.183] on October 02, 2007 09:20 PM
THAT is cool. Being able to manage the presentation from a text level provides great benefit. The universal format PDF is great too. I checked out some examples at the Beamer site and they were very well done. I am going to check into this more deeply. It looks like a great solution for creating and managing presentations to me. Text -> Beamer -> LaTeX -> PDF!

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Re: Use LaTeX for presentations :) Its far more professional

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 129.42.208.182] on October 03, 2007 02:51 PM
Yep, knew it. Somewhere in *EVERY* article about word processing or page layout *someone* has to put in a completely irrelevant remark about LaTeX. Did you perhaps ever think that on one cares?

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Re(1): Use LaTeX for presentations :) Its far more professional

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 155.138.250.7] on October 03, 2007 06:52 PM
Of course! What sense does it make to compare page layout or presentation packages if you don't compare them to the industry standard?

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Re(2): Use LaTeX for presentations :) Its far more professional

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 146.50.15.64] on October 11, 2007 11:48 AM
Yeah, and Beamer, LaTeX & PDF are just <sarcasm>great</sarcasm> for playing audio and movies as part of a professional (and academic) presentation...

Stop comparing apples and oranges

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 74.192.255.209] on October 02, 2007 06:21 PM
One very good thing: You can try Impress without spending any money.

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Think big... the BIG picture...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 208.228.181.183] on October 02, 2007 06:22 PM
Who cares about the minute details of feature comparison? The writer is selecting specific things to compare, but does not consider the big picture at all. I have never been dissapointed by using OpenOffice Impress. I have Impress installed on several Linux workstations and everyone in my family can use it on their own personal system. It would cost a fortune to pull that off using Microsoft products. I would have to buy the Windows OS and the MS Office package, a hefty $600 investment for each of 5 machines. A whopping $3000 !!... and of course renew/refresh/whatever that every two to three years as expected from Microsoft. For 10 year timeframe we are looking at ~$9000 for malware ridden Microsoft frustrations !!! ... GET REAL, we aint goin there.

When you consider the big picture, the choice is EASY. Features, cost, licensing, freedom, .........Open Office wins hands down!!

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Re: Think big... the BIG picture...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 143.166.255.56] on October 02, 2007 11:31 PM
"Who cares about the minute details of feature comparison?"

Welllll...a group that has money to spend may want to know. If price is no BIG object or they have negotiating power, they need to know what they would get versus less of what they will have to spend. Comparing features, especially against something they are familiar with, is a good way to get a feeling how well they can work with an application.

I wholeheartedly agree with you, though, on how OOo can be used across the board on a ton of machines without paying the premium. I also love the fact you can drop it in a multitude of different architectures (PowerPC, Mactel, PC, etc.) and operating systems, and you can expect pretty much the same level of accessibility to file formats across the board.

If I were deciding for a company, I'd go for OOo with all the Oxygen Office extensions.

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Re(1): Think big... the BIG picture...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 195.67.11.210] on November 28, 2007 08:12 AM
A fool and his money are soon parted. Yes, one must invest some money and effort to earn money, but when is comes to the reality of things, then there is really a very minor difference between the functionality of OOo and MS-O. If you can claim that the few features that MS-O has different than OOo will generate the enough extra income to cover the cost of a MS product, and then some, then you have a valid reason to spend money on MS products. 9000$ over a period of 10 years is still 9000$, and a tidy sum of money. and as one of my friends says. it is not by earning a lot of money one becomes rich, but by reducing the expenses. His yearly income is about 1000 000$

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Re: Think big... the BIG picture...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 129.130.52.3] on October 03, 2007 06:37 PM
That is exactly the wrong attitude...free software has the added benefit that it often costs less, but that's not why you should use it. You should use it because it is better. Many users will buy a single copy and use it for ten years. Some will even get a discounted academic price. If a package doesn't do what you want, the wrong answer is, "Well, it's free. What are you complaining about?" Free software is supposed to be better, not lower cost.

You are entitled to your own opinion, but that kind of response gives free software exactly the kind of reputation it doesn't need.

If you're making your living giving presentations, you'll gladly pay an extra $9000 for ten years of being able to do your job the right way.

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Re(1): Think big... the BIG picture...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 96.225.145.106] on October 08, 2007 03:35 AM
Agreed. Not only should it be free, it should also be hasslefree.

To illustrate...I'm using gNumeric because OO Calc was absolutely horrible at graphing. No trendlines. You can't add labels after the fact. The graphs were extremely unprofessional looking and required a lot of time-wasteful tweaking after they were made...

I'm now searching for a different presentation program because Impress's animation engine is starting to give me headaches. It froze on me in the middle of a presentation, how embarrassing is that? I could flip through slides no problem but the animations that I spent hours making were a complete no-go.

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Nice to see an honest software review!

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 69.248.236.96] on October 02, 2007 07:25 PM
Impress is just fine for simple presentations, but it stumbles badly beyond that:


• It's graphics layer is buggy and slow. Layered effects can fail entirely; animations and transitions are so jumpy and slow they're almost unusable.


• The ability to link animations is extremely limited: e.g., I could not find a way to show a sequence of images changing smoothly from one to the next.


• It's presentation consistency tools are horribly buggy and confused. Where PPT has a clean and powerful implementation of the master slide feature with which you can design and apply a presentation-wide theme, Impress has a buggy and confusing stew of templates, styles and master slides.


E.g., in PPT, one can easily set all top-level bullet points to appear on a click, with a consistent animation, just by applying those settings to elements on the master slide. Impress has nothing comparable. You can apply animations to elements on the master slide but they have no effect on the content slides. Eh?


These are somewhat advanced features not needed for many situations, but they are used daily by many PPT users. Impress feels like switching from a touring bike to a child's tricycle with a broken wheel.

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Re: Nice to see an honest software review!

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 65.25.5.223] on October 04, 2007 05:50 AM
This reminds me of Jeff Gordon when the fans were throwing debrie at his care after he won this year. His comment was he liked it because it ment he was going good. hmmmm

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 201.9.55.203] on October 02, 2007 08:16 PM
This code not remain in nibana outself selfr
code

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Alas, I had problems with OpenOffice Impress

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 70.23.243.39] on October 03, 2007 02:45 PM
Using the alt key to get into the menus did not work properly. Also, numbering proved to be problematic unless the first line of text was number 1.

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Great result for OO.org

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 89.176.87.53] on October 03, 2007 02:54 PM
Who would compare this two office packages few years ago? OpenOffice.org is growing better and better. People start to be interested in it.

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 64.81.223.226] on October 03, 2007 04:42 PM
Hey you forgot to test performance. For some reason, even with Graphics Acceleration turned on from the OO preferences, OO animations run jumpy and slow.... When you consider that, Microsoft is still the winner.

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Not too bad for a free application...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 62.166.2.26] on October 03, 2007 05:41 PM
A lot of people have criticized OpenOffice.org. They compare this suite with MS-Office, and find it lacking. Well - you can ask yourself... Is the price of MS-Office worth the few improvements over OpenOffice.org? The answer for the biggest chunk of the users is - probably not!


You see - about 90% to 95% of the users are using an office suite with just the basic functions. And the speed of starting up is no issue at all. You see - editing the text, or writing a letter or something takes far, far more time than starting up the application. So - again - are those start up seconds MS-Office gains on OpenOffice.org really worth the massive price of MS-Office? Again - the answer is... probably not!


I think OpenOffice.org is a incredible piece of software if you remember it's totally free. Yes - MS-Office "can" have some advances for the heavy user, but you pay the price for those advances. But I think the price is far to high for the casual and normal user - just to get little speed gain and a lot of functions you probably never will use..


Note: Sorry about my English - it's not my native language...

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MP3 works here

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 67.172.157.202] on October 04, 2007 01:33 AM
Not sure what's up with your Impress installation, but 2.3 can play mp3s here.

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IBM joins the OpenOffice.org community

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 65.25.5.223] on October 04, 2007 05:41 AM
Anyone keep up on the news, maybe this will help what you believe to be an inferior counterpart.

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 213.220.202.70] on October 04, 2007 09:28 PM
NIce comparison, the other player here is Keynote (with much smoother transitions). It is pitty the OOO.org isnot being compared to this one.

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Any chance to have such a great comparison work done with a 3d program?

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 62.205.90.134] on October 05, 2007 11:58 PM
I would then suggest Apple KeyNote... That one seems quite different from both OOo Impress and MS PowerPoint - I would be interested in a similar comparison made by a knowledgeable person (unlike myself).

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Font Increase and Decrease Button

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 125.160.176.183] on October 08, 2007 08:56 AM
Impress has no Font Increase and Decrease Button instead of Font Size button. These simple button is helpfull when you edit font size than using font size button...

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Re: Font Increase and Decrease Button

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 130.88.166.193] on October 09, 2007 11:17 AM
And more importantly Impress does not have auto-increase, auto-decrease as in Powerpoint (when you write more than can fit in a slide). That is the reason I stopped using impress. I still use the rest of OO applications.

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Re(1): Font Increase and Decrease Button

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 195.67.11.210] on November 28, 2007 08:25 AM
You can't expect to have everything that everyone else has. I guess it all bubbles down to what functions you are used to using, and how you use them. more important. Are you willing to change the way you work, a little, to save some money ?? If I was to set up a network of computers for my company, what would I want to do. Save 5-600$ on each machine, by installing Linux, and OO, and then telling the workers to suck it up and spend 30 minutes learning the new software, or install MS software. And then i haven't even started talking about saved costs on the computer hardware budget because I have to update the computers less often, lowered cost on serving the network due to viruses, spy-ware/add-ware and so on.

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 59.92.171.170] on October 12, 2007 06:03 AM
I am a new user of OpenOffice.org v.2.2, and am happy with the software. I did have some problems when I tried to present on a system that used Office200. The transitions playback and line by line addition for each slide did not happen. The slide came up with all the line of text in one slide, forcing me to make individual slides for each line. How does OpenOffice get around this as many a time I would have to present on a Microsoft Office loaded system?

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and it did not run properly on the conference ...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 71.162.60.128] on October 14, 2007 03:33 AM
Personally think that both powerpoint and impress fall short. Powerpoint has the terrible situation that different versions are not compatible. Ever tried mac powerpoints on pc's - it's a mess? Impress has to be accompanied by 'Portable Open Office' on your jump - for sure it's not installed on the computer in the conference room. Video support in both isn't great either and you'll always have to keep you fingers cross: will it run??? It would be great if we had a good fall back format. Flash would be a logical one. Impress does export to flash, but strangely enough, all video content is missing after the export. PDF is too static. Any idea's?

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Re: and it did not run properly on the conference ...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 75.21.149.56] on November 29, 2007 05:14 PM
yeah, look at how you're exporting stuff, noob.

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 83.8.202.228] on October 14, 2007 06:39 PM
Thanks for another very interesting article. Keep up the good work. Regards
<a href="http://www.profesjonalna-reklama.pl" target="_blank">Pozycjonowanie</a> <a href="http://www.topblogposts.info" target="_blank">Tom</a>

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 85.15.37.17] on October 21, 2007 11:29 AM
hi
I like to show impress file and all slides but without open office or microsof office like pps format in microsoft office

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 10.153.8.99] on October 23, 2007 10:36 PM
you could have evaluated also the IBM Lotus (modified openoffice.org version) it has better graphics so may be interesting see it on this competition :)

thanks
Carlos Morales

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 89.61.228.164] on November 01, 2007 04:20 AM
Thanks for sharing this with us.
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Both programs are af my eyes inferior to good old Scala MM

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 195.67.11.210] on November 28, 2007 07:53 AM
Well, this test of the two programs may be good, but neither of these programs will ever match Scala MM in ease of use, and speed when it comes to making presentations. Scala MM has in its turn several features that PP and Impress do not have. Oh, yes, Scala may not be intended to be a slide show presentation program, but it will beat both of the two other programs hands down. Unfortunately Scala in in s complete different league than pp and Impress, and it is not produced any more. My old CD with Scala MM on works only on win2k. However, I still think that win2k works better and more stable than both Vista and XP. and "bah humbug" to security features. For each new Security feature in vista there are ten more barn doors to walk through.

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 75.21.149.56] on November 29, 2007 05:11 PM
I've been with Windows since 3.1. I can't believe all of you are supporting MS Office! MS Office was good until it decided to come up with 2007. 2007 is a total eye-candy disaster. And I will have to say that older versions of OOo had glitches and bugs. But OOo 2.3 has fixed a lot of those. I don't like the new MS Office. A lot of people say it was made to compete with Macs. I can see that, too. I'm surprised some of you like the increase/decrease font button. You're all insane and illogical. That button gives you less control. The last time I did something academic, I had to control the various layout attributes. All the bullshit MS Office has now makes me think I'm using Quark Xpress.

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OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 87.69.68.26] on December 11, 2007 11:43 AM
Regarding the "Movies and slides" issue - I totaly agree that PPT wins - yep, no doubt !

Roei from <a href="http://www.Reverse-Cell-Phone-Numbers.com">Reverse Cell Phone numbers</a> website

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org IS THERE AN ANSWER

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 212.219.90.61] on December 13, 2007 01:13 PM
I am trying oo for the first time and I need to put a copy of a ppt on our plasma screen - which wont accept ppt/pps etc.

I thought oo had the answer - I opened it into oo then tried to save it as flash as instructed, I got quite excited as it seemed so easy. but................when i opened the swf file everything was there except the images??????????

when I went back into OO the only thing i can see that might affect the output is that the when i click on the image it thinks it is a text box?

Is there an answer?

I like the feel of OO so far apart from this prob of course.:)

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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 88.230.192.187] on December 14, 2007 04:34 PM
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Office shootout: OpenOffice.org Impress vs. Microsoft PowerPoint, round 2

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 89.0.140.172] on December 15, 2007 01:16 PM
How does the current version of OpenOffice.org (OOo) compare with Microsoft Office in its ability to produce slide presentations? The last time I tried to answer that question, two years ago, both OOo Impress and Microsoft PowerPoint had features that the other lacked. To see how the two programs compare now, I installed Microsoft Office 2007 and OpenOffice.org 2.3, and went through the process of designing a slide show from start to finish. To my surprise, the results were more decisive than in my last comparison. They're not enough to award a knockout victory, but, even based on points, the winner is clear.

Starting the creation of a presentation in the Office 2007 version of PowerPoint is different in several ways from earlier versions. First, the Autosummarize feature in Microsoft Word is no longer part of the default interface, so you can no longer easily create a slide show from the outline headings in a text document. Microsoft TechNet explains that Autosummarize was removed because it was a "low use feature." Personally, I am glad that version 2.3 of OOo Writer retains the equivalent Abstract feature.


Zvi Razel <a href="http://www.razel-group.com">Razel Group</a>


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travian

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 88.241.119.9] on January 02, 2008 07:40 PM
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Well...

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 76.208.190.201] on February 15, 2008 07:13 AM
I'm just a student, so don't bite me if you don't agree with me.

I'd have to side with PowerPoint in this one. Most of the OpenOffice programs are good enough for simple stuff. But Impress does take forever to load (which isn't good when you're trying to rush a project. :] ) and it freezes often if you're trying to put pictures in, even for a simple, run-of-the-mill slideshow. There seems to be a lot of stuff that you don't need in Impress. And trying to use sound is a lost cause. I had a presentation that had an audio clip about twenty seconds and Impress Portable froze on me in the middle. Took about fifteen minutes to get it back up again.

But on a side note, I like the increase/decrease font button. You don't have to guess at how big pt. 44 font is, you just adjust in increments that you can see on your slide.

So I'd pick PowerPoint, really, if not for the cost of Microsoft Office. But Office 2007 is an organizational disaster. There's just too much _stuff_.

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Well... (forgot something

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 76.208.190.201] on February 15, 2008 07:18 AM
And there's the fact that it takes about three minutes to save a twenty-slide presentation. Literally, three minutes. If that's not a pain, nothing is. And everything on my computer stops while Impress is saving. So I'm stuck sitting there for a few minutes every time I don't want to lose my work. Ridiculous. I'd choose PowerPoint if only for the faster saving.

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