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Re: Ten sticking points for new Ubuntu users

Posted by: Anonymous [ip: 208.74.247.253] on October 29, 2008 01:10 PM
I have tried Linux several times. First in the mid 90's, then again in the the early 2000's, and again in 2008. I fully agree that there is no understandable documentation for a new user. So, I went to some of the Linux discussion groups and newsgroups. I found many people who responded as if I was a total idiot, and many were quite rude. The few who really did attempt to help me, continued to use terms that left me more confused. With all the distros of Linux, how come none of them can make an install CD that just installs the entire operating system without user intervention. MS Windows has been doing this for years, where the user only has to enter their timezone, and are given the opportunity to select the items installed or not. Once installed, Windows is pretty much ready to use. I dont much care for Windows, particularly the direction that it is heading. I'd like an alternative. But aside from buying a Macintosh, my PC computers are locked into Microsoft. Linux is often referred to as the alternative to Windows, but it's simply not for the average home or small business computer user. I keep asking why? Dedicated Linux users claim their OS is the best, yet none of them ever make a Distro that is usable for the average guy. Once again, much of the problem is the documentation, but it also seems that the installation process could be made to be automatic, if the Linux developers really wanted to promote their OS. I often get the feeling that Linux users and developers dont want the avarage guy to use Linux. They are like an exclusive country club, where only the elite are allowed. I'd like to get rid of MS software, but I know it's not going to be Linux, at least not anytime soon. I have no intention of trying Linux again.

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